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Thread: A Most Natural Hobby

  1. #51
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    No. What kind of feed do you have out? You should be getting an assortment of finches, along with other birds. If there are plenty of mature trees, then you should also have the woodpeckers and cardinals. Sparrows are a given.
    Giving them Pennington Ultra Fruit and Nut Blend in the hopper, and Pennington Classic in the tray. Maybe I should have bought the $5 40 pound bag of seed at Wal-Mart ...
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #52
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    The best choice is sunflower seeds. Get the ones that are already shelled and you won't have the clean-up issue. Peanuts work very well for woodpeckers.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  3. #53
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    The best choice is sunflower seeds. Get the ones that are already shelled and you won't have the clean-up issue. Peanuts work very well for woodpeckers.
    That's all I buy - sunflower kernels or hearts in 40-lb. bags. I attract a decent variety of birds, it's cheaper to buy in bulk and there's no waste. Anything that falls on the ground is fair game for the chipmunks and squirrels.

    Oh yeah, I do buy suet as well. Woodpeckers love suet.

  4. #54
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Interesting article in my fair city's newspaper:
    Utility wires empower birds' perspective

    Social and feeding purposes.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  5. #55
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Falconry spreads its wings

    Across the country, there are between 4,000 and 4,500 falconers, making it an exclusive group.
    There are 23 pages of regulations that falconers must follow
    Do you know any falconers ?

    According to the article it takes a lot of effort to become one.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  6. #56
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Master Naturalist

    Put in an application to participate in teh Texas Master Naturalist program last week. Similar to the Master Gardener program but focused on the wider environment with significant amounts of training and volunteer hours involved. Anybody else here involved?
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  7. #57
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    I enjoy watching birds... but mostly as I look down the barrel of my 12 gauge.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  8. #58
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Right now we have feeder poles in the back and side yards and I'm putting out regular seed, safflower, and black sunflower. Hummer season is over so I took down that feeder and replaced it with a nyjer feeder, as the goldfinches should return soon. I also keep a tray feeder in the back yard for the blue jays.

    Right now, the hanging feeders are pulling in cardinals, doves, wrens, chickadees, house finches, an occasional woodpecker, and a couple others I haven't gotten a good enough look at to identify.

    I probably won't put out suet for at least a month when the temperatures drop consistently for winter.

    We've only been putting out feeders for a year and a half and we both enjoy watching the birds and their behaviours. The house finch pairs dine together, and brought a passel of babies to the feeder this spring. The cardinal pairs dine one bird at a time, with the other half of the pair keeping watch from across the driveway.

    I'm not much for tromping out in the woods, so I doubt I'll ever turn into a serious bird-watcher.

  9. #59
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    Distressing even upsetting news -

    Thousands of birds make crash landing in Utah

    Thousands of migrating birds, apparently mistaking parking lots for ponds, crashed into the ground throughout southern Utah this week, resulting in a marathon rescue and collection effort.
    476 news websites picked up the story.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  10. #60
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNA View post
    Distressing even upsetting news -

    Thousands of birds make crash landing in Utah



    476 news websites picked up the story.
    Is today depressing dying animal story day?

    Poor birds, poor poor birds
    Occupy Your Brain!

  11. #61
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    It was very sad! The front here is on a major migration path for so many really impressive birds and hearing that story yesterday on the local news was just heart-breaking. It's fantastic in the fall to look up and see them all. The wetlands all around the Great Salt Lake also are extraordinary for birds. Ibis, sand cranes, blue herons...on and on and on.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  12. #62
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I believe I saw a ruffed grouse this morning near the woods by my house



    At any rate, it looked an awful lot like the bird above
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  13. #63
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    That bird looks like it would be delicious to eat

  14. #64
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Saw another blue jay at lunch in my front yard. Lately I have been seeing tons of blue jays in my yard. I mean I might notice a half dozen blue jays throughout the year but for some reason I've had multiple sitings every day in my yard the last 2-3 weeks. They aren't migratory. I haven't set out a feeder recently. I wonder what's drawing them in?

    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  15. #65
    Cyburbian Midori's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mud Princess View post
    Not only did I recognize many of the names on that list, I have actually seen a Dickcissel!

    Yes, I am an avid birder, though I would describe my birding skills as intermediate rather than expert. My lifelist, as of this moment, is a mere 358 species, not including 14 outside North America. (A lifelist is a list of all the bird species you have ever seen, usually with the location and date.) Although we've had bird feeders for many years, I've only been an active birder for five or six years.

    Contrary to the various stereotypes, birders come in all shapes and sizes. According to a report conducted for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2001:



    Birders do tend to be higher income:



    Subsequent studies at various locations (in AZ and TX, for example) have found that birders' expenditures while traveling to engage in their favorite activity has a substantial economic impact. Not surprisingly, tourism organizations and agencies are increasingly going after this market, organizing bird trails, birding festivals, and so on.

    Last year, I spent $$$$ for a birding tour of southeastern Arizona. I added more than 100 species to my list during that trip, with assistance from the trip leader and my fellow birders. I tend to prefer quality views of a bird (e.g., a close look, or watching birds feed their young) over quantity, though -- I'm not one of those birders who is completely obsessed with expanding his or her list.

    OK, I've prattled on enough...
    One of the planners in this area presented similar stats as an argument for making birding part of a tourism program. I'm totally on board with it! I'm not a hard-core birdwatcher, but I do maintain and enjoy feeders and like to watch birds. I'll happily do a day trip to go look at some nesting eagles or check out a report of a rare species.

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