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Thread: Relocating for management opportunity

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    Relocating for management opportunity

    Hello,

    I've been lurking for a while and have found some solid advice on this forum. I'm hoping that others out there may have faced what I am now.

    I have an opportunity to take a position that is a move up the ladder, but there is no increase in pay and it would require me to relocate my family (w/ 3 small children, one in school). We would still be fairly close to my wife's family (about a 6 hour drive). I've been at my current location for about 5 years and there isn't much opportunity to move up. Moving up to the next level still would not give me supervisory experience (which is required to move up to management). I think I've been "pigeon holed" to some extent, but the pay is good and the benefits are excellent.

    My question is, is it worth it to uproot and take the position in order to move forward in my career? In experience, is it often necessary for a planner to relocate in order to find opportunity? Is being a manager more headache than it's worth? Thanks for any input on thes and any other related questions.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by 117326 View post
    Hello,

    I've been lurking for a while and have found some solid advice on this forum. I'm hoping that others out there may have faced what I am now.

    I have an opportunity to take a position that is a move up the ladder, but there is no increase in pay and it would require me to relocate my family (w/ 3 small children, one in school). We would still be fairly close to my wife's family (about a 6 hour drive). I've been at my current location for about 5 years and there isn't much opportunity to move up. Moving up to the next level still would not give me supervisory experience (which is required to move up to management). I think I've been "pigeon holed" to some extent, but the pay is good and the benefits are excellent.

    My question is, is it worth it to uproot and take the position in order to move forward in my career? In experience, is it often necessary for a planner to relocate in order to find opportunity? Is being a manager more headache than it's worth? Thanks for any input on thes and any other related questions.
    Make a list. Two columns, reasons to move in one, to stay in the other.
    Be sure to include quality of life issues such as: your neighbor is a great friend, your commute is five minutes, etc. Have the Mrs. make a similar list.
    After compiling these, eventually you might want to float them past your current management. It's amazing how often "we don't have any budget for raises" flies out the window when a resignation letter looms.

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    Cyburbian vagaplanner's avatar
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    Are there no other jobs out there where you could advance and get an increase? Seems like there would be something, somewhere.

    If you would be accepting the same pay, I would consider the expenses of moving such as renting the moving truck, travel costs, paying deposits on the new apartment (if you rent), deposits on utilities at the new place. Plus, how does the costs of living compare? If it is higher at the new place, it will be like you're getting paid less.
    ...my lifestyle determines my death style!
    - Metallica

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    question about relocation policies at private sector firms

    I'm in the process of getting offers an' stuff for positions at private-sector planning consultancy (mostly A&E) firms. Should they offer/or should I ask for relocation costs as part of my negotiation process? What's customary? Basically, I'm going to have to sell a house in one city and buy a place in another, moving all of my stuff between coasts.

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cismontane View post
    I'm in the process of getting offers an' stuff for positions at private-sector planning consultancy (mostly A&E) firms. Should they offer/or should I ask for relocation costs as part of my negotiation process? What's customary? Basically, I'm going to have to sell a house in one city and buy a place in another, moving all of my stuff between coasts.
    Doesn't hurt to ask, but i would think it depends on the position you are being offered. If it were for a manger of services / principal / or other high ranking position then i am sure they would offer so help to fill a void that the company so desperatly needs. If you are taking a "non" management role such as an beginning or mid-level job, more than likely they might not help.

    Also it depends on what the job sector is and where it is at. Say here in california, private firms are cutting back job openings left and right so unless you are working in the civic design/public safety or commercial sector where it is gang busters, i would still say no.
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

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    Quote Originally posted by Veloise View post
    Make a list. Two columns, reasons to move in one, to stay in the other.
    Be sure to include quality of life issues such as: your neighbor is a great friend, your commute is five minutes, etc. Have the Mrs. make a similar list.
    After compiling these, eventually you might want to float them past your current management. It's amazing how often "we don't have any budget for raises" flies out the window when a resignation letter looms.
    Thanks. I've started this. After discussing it with the family, I will be meeting with my boss to let him know my position. Unfortunately, it is government and they, at least in the past, have fallen back on the Admin. Policies and stated, "remember, it's not just about the money..." as they get in the Lexus and head home...

    Quote Originally posted by vagaplanner View post
    Are there no other jobs out there where you could advance and get an increase? Seems like there would be something, somewhere.

    If you would be accepting the same pay, I would consider the expenses of moving such as renting the moving truck, travel costs, paying deposits on the new apartment (if you rent), deposits on utilities at the new place. Plus, how does the costs of living compare? If it is higher at the new place, it will be like you're getting paid less.
    Actually, I am in a community with just a few large planning agencies and little private sector opportunity (other than pushing permits), and I am not sure I'd want to work for the other agencies (reputation of bad atmospheres and management). The people I work with and the environment I am in is great, with the exception of the limited opportunity for growth. I would also have to sell a house in a lousy market, but would hope to make it up on the buying end in a similar market. Cost of living is a little lower in the new place, so that' s a plus, but right now I'm on a 4 day work week and would move to a 5 day.

    I know I want to move up in my career in order to be in a position to actually have some influence, and am just trying to decide if moving is the way to go. Right now, the list of pros and cons is leaning toward not, but I'm not sure if there will ever be opportunity where I am at. Thanks for the input.

    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    Doesn't hurt to ask, but i would think it depends on the position you are being offered. If it were for a manger of services / principal / or other high ranking position then i am sure they would offer so help to fill a void that the company so desperatly needs. If you are taking a "non" management role such as an beginning or mid-level job, more than likely they might not help.

    Also it depends on what the job sector is and where it is at. Say here in california, private firms are cutting back job openings left and right so unless you are working in the civic design/public safety or commercial sector where it is gang busters, i would still say no.
    I agree. Doesn't hurt to ask, but don't be too expectant. My experience is in the public sector, but I know they offered a mid-level position to someone and finally rescinded the offer and gave the job to #2 on the list because he was demanding moving expenses, a car, no probation, etc.
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 22 Oct 2007 at 3:36 PM. Reason: double reply

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