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Thread: High density residential development in Downtown Oak Park, IL (lots of photos)

  1. #1
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    High density residential development in Downtown Oak Park, IL (lots of photos)

    The following are a series of photos of the Regency Club townhomes and duplexes currently about 75% complete.

    This is an aerial of the site:

    The site is the large surface parking lot in the red box.

    Here is the rendering of the entire development:

    The mid-rise tower has not yet begun construction.

    Here is the project from spring 2006, when the townhomes were just starting construction:




    Here is the site from this past Septenber:















    Existing buildings across the street.






    These are stacked 2-story townhouses.




    Space between the townhomes and the duplexes.


    Parking below grade.

    Here are links to the floorplans:
    typical townhouse floorplan
    typical duplex floorplan
    Last edited by mendelman; 19 Oct 2007 at 3:36 PM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    I know alot is based on the market, but what's the initial price range for these units?

  3. #3
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    I know alot is based on the market, but what's the initial price range for these units?
    $450,000-$475,000 for the duplexes and $750,000-$900,000 for the townhouses.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    I like the use of the parapets on the townhomes, although each unit could have had more variety and texture (wall offsets). The cupola, unfortunately, looks cheap. It's sheer look doesn't fit well IMO.

    Overall though I think the project represents good urbanism. Was the developer aiming for a European look? Neo-Dutch Colonialism? Is it consistent with the local vernacular?
    Last edited by hilldweller; 22 Oct 2007 at 4:45 PM. Reason: grammar

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Nice

    Pretty nice project except there could more articulation. For example, shutters or planter boxes on the windows. The windows look like they would be windows on a commercial building. I'm impressed with how they were able to fit parking on site. This project wouldn't work in the city I work for because we require 1/2 parking space for guests to be provided on site. It appears that this project couldn't accomodate those guest parking spaces on site. It's a shame sometimes how parking can kill an urban infill project such as this.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Streck's avatar
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    And the fronts and the last two pictures show living conditions better than Sprawl?

    Are those heat sink balconies really desireable spaces overlooking the garbage can alley and garage doors?

    Do you think it ever gets noisy during play time and garbage pick-up time with nothing but hard surfaces to echo the sounds early in the morning and late at night?

    Are street trees not required?

    And there is no "patio" space to link occupants with the "earth," because there is no space because the whole back area is faced with garage doors.

    And this isn't even "affordable" housing.

    What is the density allowed and the density as built?

    And one last thing, if I called the "front" wall "tacky," would you know what I mean?

    I hope I didn't hurt anyone's feelings - but it is too late for that now, and it is also too late for the community.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Do you think it would be possible to navigate an SUV into one of the garages?

  8. #8
    Cyburbian CJC's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Streck View post
    And this isn't even "affordable" housing.
    ...proving that the other questions and concerns that you had don't matter to a significant number of people who have a significant amount of money.

    Different choices of living environments are needed for different people. I live in a noisy place, above two restaurants and across the street from a Starbucks. There are garbage trucks and public transit during the middle of the night outside my bedroom window. The house next door to me just sold for $1.2 million - I rent, but my rent is probably more than most people's mortgage - but it's a choice I make. I love the chaos, the noise, the five minute commute (walking), the density, the masses of people, the walk to two enormous parks, hundreds of restaurants, several grocery stores, etc. I would hate living in a low density suburb where I had to spend thousands of dollars to buy a car.

    Not to hurt your feelings, but different things are needed for different people

    My only concern - those sidewalks look VERY narrow - somewhere around 4'?
    Last edited by mendelman; 24 Oct 2007 at 10:01 AM.

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