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Thread: Non-profit jobs

  1. #1
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    Non-profit jobs

    Hi,

    what sort of non-profit jobs are available to people with a bachelors in planning?

    thanks,

    Sean

  2. #2
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    You could always work at a community development corporation. You'll need to brush up on real estate finance, however, if you want to work in housing development. You could also be a community organizer. Lots of CDC organizers have an urban planning background.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    I'm interested in that too...how does one learn about finance? (Outside of attending college again, of course)
    Do you want to pet my monkey?

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    We have a very difficult time finding dedicated (& intelligent) people interested in doing affordable housing development.

    There are a lot of really good training opportunities, (such as NeighborWorks) which I wouldn't pay for out of pocket but would be useful if you could get your university or other source to pay for. These would also be really good networking opportunities as CDC's from around the country attend.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    Do you have to be a math whiz to handle it?
    Do you want to pet my monkey?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    Not at all. I'm no math whiz and I did the work for a year. I liked the nonprofit world a lot and will probably return one day. You need to be able to work with proformas, have a good sense of the development cycle (project visioning through occupancy) and understand the basics of how a real estate deal works. I believe Urban Land Institute offers courses, as does the Bloustein Institute (which is online, by the way). I took NeighborWorks courses and found them pretty useful, but I wouldn't have shelled out the cash if the CDC hadn't been paying.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    I would echo what machete james said. . .if you learn the PMT, PV, and a few other financial functions in excel you should be good. . .I didn't like the bloustein (Rutgers) classes at all. . . but NW is good (again if you aren't paying), I think ULI woudl be good, but I don't think they gear their classes towards the non-profit sector.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Clore's avatar
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    Is there some reason you don't want to work with local govt? I switched from local govt to nonprofit and I find that (at least this) nonprofit is inefficient, dysfunctional and unstable financially.
    I would much rather work with a dedicated yearly budget with a steady revenue stream and not have to worry about being billable to certain projects. I feel more like a consultant here than someone providing a public service.
    ...Moving at the speed of local government

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    I was going to add that if you wanted to do work involved with land conservation and/or urban parks, the Trust for Public Land is (tpl dot org) pays reasonably, and is a decent place to work (from what I've heard). . .

  10. #10
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Clore View post
    Is there some reason you don't want to work with local govt? I switched from local govt to nonprofit and I find that (at least this) nonprofit is inefficient, dysfunctional and unstable financially.
    I would much rather work with a dedicated yearly budget with a steady revenue stream and not have to worry about being billable to certain projects. I feel more like a consultant here than someone providing a public service.
    I know what you mean, but I am bored out of my mind in local gov planning. I thought housing might be more interesting...
    Do you want to pet my monkey?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    One of the nice things about housing (or at least my role in it) is that I get something built, I get to be enterpeurial, I get to go to project sites, and something happens . . .things get built.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian big_g's avatar
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    Take a look at some non-profit environmental organizations or maybe even AmeriCorps. Those are where I got my start with a bachelors on planning. Pay isn't very high but its good experience.

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