Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Placing residential buildings to accommodate future subdivision

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Cyburbias Brewpub, best seat in the haus!
    Posts
    2,678

    Placing residential buildings to accommodate future subdivision

    I am looking for a good source of information on the idea of "Offset Development". Basically, the house on a lot is built on one half of the lot, preserving the ability to split the lot in the future, minimizing nonconforming lot lines after the split.

    any kind of info, good or bad would be helpful. Pointers to a specific web site or book would be wonderful. Model text would put us in heaven.

    Thanks
    Moderator note:
    Moved to Land Use and Zoning subforum because this is a good land use question. Also, changed the thread title to be less vague.

    mendelman
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  2. #2
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve
    Posts
    3,387
    It may be hard locating specific code language that addresses this issue. The concept, however, should be pretty straight forward:
    1. Plot out the parcel as if it were to be submitted to the municipality as a two-lot subdivision.
    2. Show all area (setback,. frontage, etc) requirements on the parcel.
    3. Locate the house so that it would meet all the area requirements, including those for septic and well seperation distances if applicable.
    4. Make sure the remaining land area for the second lot could also support a home meeting and structure and utility setback requirements.
    5. Submit house building permit application showing proposed location of house #1 based on all the prior work. Subdivide at will at a later date.

    Warning: if zoning use or area requirements change at a future date, you may lose the right to the future residential subdivision.
    All these years the people said he’s actin’ like a kid.
    He did not know he could not fly, so he did.
    - - Guy Clark, "The Cape"

  3. #3
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Land of Confusion
    Posts
    3,822
    What is the point of this exactly? To pay less in taxes?

  4. #4
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    9,006
    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    What is the point of this exactly? To pay less in taxes?
    Probably more about being smart when investing in property and allowing for the maximization of land/zoning rights. I think it is a very saavy and smart thing to do.

    As for information to help you, DoD, I would just echo what SGB posted. That's pretty much the way to do it.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,062
    I fought this strategy in a community I did a plan for a decade ago. Their thought was that they could allow single-family homes on two-acre lots with septic. At a future date, when sewer became available, the lot could be split to allow a new home to be built, paying for the cost of the sewer. What ended up happening is that the lots were built, nobody wanted sewer, and land beyond the two-acre belt could never be developed because of the cost.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  6. #6
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    9,006
    But what if this is a situation in a location that is already serviced by water and sewer? I think this is a good strategy when building a new house.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Cyburbias Brewpub, best seat in the haus!
    Posts
    2,678
    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    I fought this strategy in a community I did a plan for a decade ago. Their thought was that they could allow single-family homes on two-acre lots with septic. At a future date, when sewer became available, the lot could be split to allow a new home to be built, paying for the cost of the sewer. What ended up happening is that the lots were built, nobody wanted sewer, and land beyond the two-acre belt could never be developed because of the cost.
    The point of asking, is we have an..... entity, who has seen the concept in our County Comp Plans. Explaining the concept to them has been difficult. They seem to want the concept codified while we want it to remain a concept as per the general explanation on this thread.

    The answer was to learn more about it, so we have the ability to further explain how it might be used and observe how it has been codified if possible.

    Thanks for the description Cardinal. Any chance you could PM me the town where this happened so I might find out some more in specific? The condept seems sound, but the situation you described sounds earily familiar to the local populace in this location.

    People would not pay more or less in taxes in this location. 2 acre lots are standard in most areas.
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    South Milwaukee
    Posts
    8,935
    I've worked with ordiances in the past that deal with this - called "shadow platting". Check out the City of Hartford WI land division ordinance.

    BTW Duke, do you still have the 29 Steps? My new firm is HQ'd in Green Bay and I need to take some of the home office blokes out for a pint or two.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Jukin' City
    Posts
    16,984
    This paragraph, under Applicability, is in our subdivision ordinance.

    Subdivisions created where well and septic tank regulations require 1/2 acre lots or other State Health Department regulations may be platted into "future lot subdivisions". This concept involves a plat showing 1/4 or 1/3 acre lots that are sold in 1/2 acre parcels that may be further subdivided into building lots as water and/or sewer service becomes available. Houses must be located on these parcels so as to accommodate future building lots. These types of subdivisions will be reviewed and approved on a case-by-case basis.
    Do we enforce it? No.
    Why? "...parcels may be further subdivided..." "Houses must be located..."
    Annoyingly insensitive

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 2
    Last post: 23 Jun 2011, 3:46 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last post: 28 Sep 2007, 4:28 PM
  3. Street width - residential subdivision
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 28
    Last post: 17 Jan 2007, 9:38 AM
  4. Replies: 20
    Last post: 26 Aug 2005, 9:11 AM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last post: 03 Mar 2004, 12:53 AM