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Thread: America over the next decade….

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    America over the next decade….

    With many primaries in the next 90 or so days, there have been a lot of people talking about what will the next decade look like. The President has been talking about the possibility of WWIII because of Iran, Chavez might cut off oil to the US… sorry Citgo Gas Stations, and if Al Gore is right NYC will be under water… yet the guy spent a million bucks on an ocean front condo in California?? Regardless of your political affiliation, the world that I bring my kids up will be different than today.

    We face changes of political unrest, social chaos, and environmental catastrophe… or do we? Many people in here were raised during the late 60’s when the race riots destroyed the rust belt, some of you where even here when a tropical paradise was bombed by an outside invader as we tried to remain neutral.

    I think that Gas prices will continue to go up and I think I will see $10.00 in my life time.
    I think that my kids will have to learn where a fall out shelter is in the even that Iran comes calling.
    I think that my kids will need to be bi-lingual because too many Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    America has become too liberal in its thinking. It does not matter who becomes president, or what we do over seas. For several years, the best teams in any sport are hunted because they are the best. Well guess what, for the past 100 years that is how the rest of the world has viewed America, and now people want to cheer on the underdog.

    What do you think America will be like in the nest ten years? Do you think that there is any way to reverse the damage that has been done over the past 50 years? What do you think it will take?
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

  2. #2
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    With many primaries in the next 90 or so days, there have been a lot of people talking about what will the next decade look like. The President has been talking about the possibility of WWIII because of Iran, Chavez might cut off oil to the US… sorry Citgo Gas Stations, and if Al Gore is right NYC will be under water… yet the guy spent a million bucks on an ocean front condo in California?? Regardless of your political affiliation, the world that I bring my kids up will be different than today.

    We face changes of political unrest, social chaos, and environmental catastrophe… or do we? Many people in here were raised during the late 60’s when the race riots destroyed the rust belt, some of you where even here when a tropical paradise was bombed by an outside invader as we tried to remain neutral.

    I think that Gas prices will continue to go up and I think I will see $10.00 in my life time.
    I think that my kids will have to learn where a fall out shelter is in the even that Iran comes calling.
    I think that my kids will need to be bi-lingual because too many Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    America has become too liberal in its thinking. It does not matter who becomes president, or what we do over seas. For several years, the best teams in any sport are hunted because they are the best. Well guess what, for the past 100 years that is how the rest of the world has viewed America, and now people want to cheer on the underdog.

    What do you think America will be like in the nest ten years? Do you think that there is any way to reverse the damage that has been done over the past 50 years? What do you think it will take?
    What do you mean by "too liberal"? As in, we welcome immigrants? You have to look at immigration in an historical context. The things people are saying about Mexicans now are the same things people used to say about the Chinese, the Irish, the Germans...All these people managed to figure out a way to get along here, and the Mexicans will, too. People are just really afraid of the change in culture- I admit it, I am too. The truth is, change is inevitable. We (native born Americans) have no more right to be here than anyone else (except Native Americans ).
    OK, enough rant. Changes coming....Hopefully improved position in the world from a diplomatic standpoint. I hope America can again be admired and modeled instead of villified. I expect some more run-ins with terrorism, more evidence of climate change, and insane gas prices, as Mike said. 10 years is almost too short...I want to move ahead to the time when we can beam places!
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian Plan-it's avatar
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    China and India will take the mantle of economic superpowers. America needs to look at our friends from across the seas (England and Japan) to understand how we can transition our economy and our position in the world.

    From Japan, we can learn that quality (or at least the branding of quality) will allow for our products to have a competitive advantage over those of India and China. We will also need to return to what we do best, which is innovate and create. For that we will need to alter our educational model to create more of a focus on hard sciences instead of the free government day care they call schooling in this country.

    From England, we can learn how to reposition ourselves politically as we transition from an Empire to a global partner. This will allow us a graceful transition off of the stage rather than the more abrupt stumbling that occured with the U.S.S.R. This means we will need to truly build equal partnerships and stop bullying our supposed allies and adversaries alike.
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  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    With many primaries in the next 90 or so days, there have been a lot of people talking about what will the next decade look like. The President has been talking about the possibility of WWIII because of Iran, Chavez might cut off oil to the US… sorry Citgo Gas Stations, and if Al Gore is right NYC will be under water… yet the guy spent a million bucks on an ocean front condo in California?? Regardless of your political affiliation, the world that I bring my kids up will be different than today.

    We face changes of political unrest, social chaos, and environmental catastrophe… or do we? Many people in here were raised during the late 60’s when the race riots destroyed the rust belt, some of you where even here when a tropical paradise was bombed by an outside invader as we tried to remain neutral.

    I think that Gas prices will continue to go up and I think I will see $10.00 in my life time.
    I think that my kids will have to learn where a fall out shelter is in the even that Iran comes calling.
    I think that my kids will need to be bi-lingual because too many Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    America has become too liberal in its thinking. It does not matter who becomes president, or what we do over seas. For several years, the best teams in any sport are hunted because they are the best. Well guess what, for the past 100 years that is how the rest of the world has viewed America, and now people want to cheer on the underdog.

    What do you think America will be like in the nest ten years? Do you think that there is any way to reverse the damage that has been done over the past 50 years? What do you think it will take?
    as in every generation; we are faced with challenges, that doesn’t mean all will go wrong.. stay positive and try to make a positive impact on yourself and your surroundings
    as in generation; we are faced with challenges, that doesn’t mean all will go wrong.. stay positive and try to make a positive impact on yourself and your surroundings

    Some things will improve and others will get worse but in the end all will be fine.. it always is...

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    With many primaries in the next 90 or so days, there have been a lot of people talking about what will the next decade look like. The President has been talking about the possibility of WWIII because of Iran, Chavez might cut off oil to the US… sorry Citgo Gas Stations, and if Al Gore is right NYC will be under water… yet the guy spent a million bucks on an ocean front condo in California?? Regardless of your political affiliation, the world that I bring my kids up will be different than today.

    We face changes of political unrest, social chaos, and environmental catastrophe… or do we? Many people in here were raised during the late 60’s when the race riots destroyed the rust belt, some of you where even here when a tropical paradise was bombed by an outside invader as we tried to remain neutral.

    I think that Gas prices will continue to go up and I think I will see $10.00 in my life time.
    I think that my kids will have to learn where a fall out shelter is in the even that Iran comes calling.
    I think that my kids will need to be bi-lingual because too many Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    America has become too liberal in its thinking. It does not matter who becomes president, or what we do over seas. For several years, the best teams in any sport are hunted because they are the best. Well guess what, for the past 100 years that is how the rest of the world has viewed America, and now people want to cheer on the underdog.

    What do you think America will be like in the nest ten years? Do you think that there is any way to reverse the damage that has been done over the past 50 years? What do you think it will take?
    PARANOID MUCH?
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  6. #6
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by KSharpe View post
    What do you mean by "too liberal"? As in, we welcome immigrants? You have to look at immigration in an historical context. The things people are saying about Mexicans now are the same things people used to say about the Chinese, the Irish, the Germans...All these people managed to figure out a way to get along here, and the Mexicans will, too. People are just really afraid of the change in culture- I admit it, I am too. The truth is, change is inevitable. We (native born Americans) have no more right to be here than anyone else (except Native Americans ).
    Thank you, thank you!!! I second your response. I find it interesting that when people talk about "illegal immigrants," they are inevitably referring to Hispanics -- whether they are here illegally or not, including Puerto Ricans who are technically U.S. citizens. I don't see too many people making a big deal about immigrants from China, Russia, India, or Canada for that matter. And by the way, a recent study found that the second generation, the children of immigrants from Central and South America, speak English well - they are assimilating at the same rate as my Eastern European ancestors did.

    This country will need these immigrants in the labor force of the future, and communities that understand and prepare for these trends will be much better off. Immigrants drive entrepreneurship and innovation in the U.S., and if we send international students back to where their home countries (when they want to stay here), they will take their talents with them.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    I don't think things will change too drastically in the next decade, with some few hiccups: gas prices will rise until the bubble bursts, at which time people will REALLY stop using their car for unneccessary trips (until then people will keep on driving as they always have and either complain that they pay too much at the pump or just use more money for gas with less discretionary income). Sustainability, LEED, emissions reduction, etc. are only effective if EVERYONE does it (you, too, China and India).

    Sprawl will not stop in the next decade, despite our hopes that we can control ALL outward growth. Yes, we have made progress over the past few decades, but alot of development is still too hard to condemn and rebuild.

    I think we will have another terrorist attack of the same proportion as 9-11 (I was not at all surprised when the world trade center was bombed).

    I am not sure what I can say about higher education and the disgusting competition that wasn't around even a decade ago. The federal government has let universities do what they want without any oversight, and I don't think this will be changed for at least a few decades.

    Don't ask, don't tell will probably be abolished, and presidential primaries will all be on the same day (I can give a flying fig about Iowa and Hampshire).

    And Stephen Colbert WILL become president.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian craines's avatar
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    COLBERT FOR PRES!!!!
    I SECOND THAT NOMINATION.

    I think everything hinges on our ability to successfully transition from a industrial based economy to a service base one. We are in the throws of reiventing ourselves and I belive are going to have to come to grips that we will no longer being number one as china will assume that role.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Plan-it View post
    China and India will take the mantle of economic superpowers. America needs to look at our friends from across the seas (England and Japan) to understand how we can transition our economy and our position in the world.

    From Japan, we can learn that quality (or at least the branding of quality) will allow for our products to have a competitive advantage over those of India and China. We will also need to return to what we do best, which is innovate and create. For that we will need to alter our educational model to create more of a focus on hard sciences instead of the free government day care they call schooling in this country.

    From England, we can learn how to reposition ourselves politically as we transition from an Empire to a global partner. This will allow us a graceful transition off of the stage rather than the more abrupt stumbling that occured with the U.S.S.R. This means we will need to truly build equal partnerships and stop bullying our supposed allies and adversaries alike.
    Very intelligent reply. How about Plan-it for prez???

  10. #10
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Very intelligent reply. How about Plan-it for prez???

    I agree

    Regarding the illegal Hispanic population, that is just on my mind after I attempted to ask a question at a national big box retail home improvement store and the person on the floor (stocking shelves) spoke no English. When my ancestors came over from Ireland, they spoke Gaelic… but had to learn English to survive.
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

  11. #11
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I think we need to hire a consultant and do a Comp Plan!

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Plan-it's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian View post
    I think we need to hire a consultant and do a Comp Plan!
    LOL...that is funny! Ask any MPO and I am sure that is the response you would get
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  13. #13
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Regarding the illegal Hispanic population, that is just on my mind after I attempted to ask a question at a national big box retail home improvement store and the person on the floor (stocking shelves) spoke no English. When my ancestors came over from Ireland, they spoke Gaelic… but had to learn English to survive.
    I don't quite see how this relates to your comments about illegal immigrants. Did you have some suspicion this person was, in fact, illegal? Or was it just that he didn't speak English. I feel these two issues are very often conflated. One can be in the US living and working legally and still not be a fluent English speaker. I knew plenty of engineering and physics students in college from Asian nations that had a very limited grasp of English and yet they were not illegal aliens. Its not a crime.

    And what makes you assume this person was not trying to learn English? It doesn't seem very fair, based on your interaction, to assume that he is consciously resisting learning English as some sort of political statement or sense of entitlement, not to mention the guised assertion that he might be illegal.

    I grew up in Philadelphia and spent enough time in Chinatown and South Philadelphia to hear plenty of people speaking Chinese or Italian instead of English. Language is a hard thing to learn and, generally speaking, the older you are, the harder it is. Older immigrants tend to have a harder time than younger ones.

    I think Ksharpe is correct that this dynamic of language is nothing new - it has always been this way when a wave of people from another part of the world shows up at our doorstep. One can always point to a particular person or family that was dedicated to learning English in the past, but I can find many such people right here in my own city today that espouse the same ethos. I have several friends whose parents or grandparents moved from Mexico and guess what? - they speak English. Yes, it can take a generation or two and yes, some people have a harder time than others, but generally speaking, immigrants want to assimilate and they want their children to succeed, so I personally don't see this as a
    big social problem.

    Personally, I think the language issue is overblown, and I live in an area with a very high percentage of Spanish speaking folks from other countries.

    But back to the main question:
    As for the next decade, I expect we will see two terms of Democratic presidents (or, rather, the same one for two terms).

    My hopeful side believes that we will be able to loosen the stranglehold big business has on government to create more opportunity for smaller, innovative companies and to promote entrepreneurship. This is the only way we will be able to become economically nimble again and dynamically respond to the challenges of our day. Technology-based enterprises will rule the day.

    I do not believe Iran will have the capability or desire to bomb us anytime in the next decade. We are more useful to them as a distant imperialist enemy than as a direct military adversary.

    We will likely experience a significant recession, fueled both by sky-rocketing oil prices and the crumbling housing market.

    Housing will become a major issue as the middle class struggles to regain a more solid footing in the economy. Similarly, the gap between the very wealthy and the poorest among us will continue to increase (but if entrepreneurship and innovation can be fostered, this could help turn things around over the long haul).

    I think we will see some form of nationalized healthcare.

    My worst fear of the next 10 years? Bush suspends the 2008 elections by exercising a "state of emergency" order. The legal documents are already in place to allow this to happen without congressional approval. 8 years ago, I would have seen this as paranoid. Today, I would not put anything past the neocons.

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  14. #14
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    We live in an age of fear, and it has gripped this nation since Sept 11, 2001 and continues to grip most people when it fueled by a man whom is running the country and doesn't seem to care about what reports say nor what his constituents want in terms of changing our country's direction. This country needs a new direction and unfortunately none of the major candidates in both parties are offering that at this point.

    As Americans, over the next decade we need to come to grips with losing our number 1 global status and focus on further diversifying our technological innovation, as well as lead the charge in such fields as biotechnology innovation, renewable energy, and alternative fuels.

    We also need to take a larger role in re-establishing the UN as a true global force in helping qualm some of the major tension that is out there in the world. It seems like the WTO has more clout the UN.

    This country needs to broaden is education opportunities because we have a broken public school system in most major metro regions. College needs to be obtainable to all and programs such as math and science need to be re-emphasized in junior and high school ala the 1960's as we were "losing" the space race to the Russians.

    Our priorities need to be retooled to focus on the ills of america, rather than the ills of the global world. While we should continue to play a role in affairs abroad, the lack of attention to america's education, infrastructure, and over all "hands off" approach to the economy may lead America through a more turbulent period for the next decade.

    Oh and the following may occur:
    Brittney Spears will have more and more children
    The gremlin will make a comeback
    The Cubs will win a world series
    Barry Bonds will not go to jail
    Tom Cruise will finally come out of the closet
    Hugh Hefener will still be around
    The mullet will make a comeback
    and...
    Fanny packs and heat sensitive shirts will be back in style with all their neon glory!
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  15. #15
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    We live in an age of fear, and it has gripped this nation since Sept 11, 2001
    We've always lived in an age of fear. It isn't attributed to this decade or the current U.S. president. Throughout history, we've always been afraid of something. First it was the Native Americans, then taxes, then the Spaniards, then outlaws and train robbers, then losing our jobs during the Depression, then Nazis and Japs, then the Soviets, then either the "white man" or the "black man", then the oil crisis, then global cooling, then school shootings, and now terrorism and global warming. This is nothing new.

    But, somehow, everything seems to work itself out in the end.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Regarding the illegal Hispanic population, that is just on my mind after I attempted to ask a question at a national big box retail home improvement store and the person on the floor (stocking shelves) spoke no English.
    Off-topic:
    Of course, you probably would have had a better customer service experience at a locally owned store.
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  17. #17
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by SGB View post
    Off-topic:
    Of course, you probably would have had a better customer service experience at a locally owned store.

    Ture...


    *and I found out from a friend of mine who worked there for the summer that he, and about four others were hired under the table and are infact Illegal.
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

  18. #18
    Cyburbian CJC's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Ture...


    *and I found out from a friend of mine who worked there for the summer that he, and about four others were hired under the table and are infact Illegal.
    That's a HUGE news story. You have verifiable proof that a national home improvement retailer is hiring people under the table (the bigger issue) and hiring people that are illegal? I'd go straight to CNN. If what you say is true, that national retailer is breaking quite a few laws, quite blatantly. (as is your friend, of course )

  19. #19

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    I can't let this go unchallenged, and I can't believe other people here did:

    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Many people in here were raised during the late 60’s when the race riots destroyed the rust belt...
    "Race riots" did not destroy the Rust Belt. The steady decline of the manufacturing economy over the last 40 years destroyed the Rust Belt. The Rust Belt's slow pace of transition from a manufacturing economy to service or information economies destroyed the Rust Belt. The power structure, political, economical and social, which sought to hold on desperately to its gains, and then tried to put a racial face on its challenges -- that destroyed the Rust Belt.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    I agree

    Regarding the illegal Hispanic population, that is just on my mind after I attempted to ask a question at a national big box retail home improvement store and the person on the floor (stocking shelves) spoke no English. When my ancestors came over from Ireland, they spoke Gaelic… but had to learn English to survive.
    Was it Home Depot? I hear that is the place where out in front good hard-working Americans hire illegal aliens to do construction work they can't get American workers to do right and on-time.

    Sad truth is that a lot of the time if you want an employee that will work hard for not much money you have to hire an immigrant (legal or illegal). I know. Where my wife works (she's a Colombian-born, now a U.S. citizen) the good workers speak English as a second language. The lazy ones smoking cigarettes and talking on their cell phones when they are supposed to be working are all Americans.

    But back to the question about where will America be in ten years. The more it changes the more it stays the same. Unless we get some sort of kick in the teeth, we will do what we have always done.

    Until there is a financial gun to their head big business will continue to have gas-guzzling cars and we will pay through the teeth to the oil companies, who will continue to have the ear of our leaders.

    People don't go outside much, so there will continue to be a vocal minority of people concerned about the environment, but most people won't really give a damn.

    The politics of scare tactics will continue. 9-11 will be practically tatooed on the head of any person in an elective office.

    Things won't change much. Most people will get up in the morning, get their kids to school, go to work for too many hours (often for too little pay), come home, make dinner, spend a few hours with their families, then go to bed and start all over tomorrow.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

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  21. #21
    Cyburbian Brocktoon's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner View post
    We've always lived in an age of fear. It isn't attributed to this decade or the current U.S. president. Throughout history, we've always been afraid of something. First it was the Native Americans, then taxes, then the Spaniards, then outlaws and train robbers, then losing our jobs during the Depression, then Nazis and Japs, then the Soviets, then either the "white man" or the "black man", then the oil crisis, then global cooling, then school shootings, and now terrorism and global warming. This is nothing new.

    But, somehow, everything seems to work itself out in the end.

    I think you are exactly right. The manias we experiences with the Soviets is a three page list.


    As for the US's position in the world in the coming years...



    The US will still be the dominate force in the world in 10 years and will possibly be the dominate country both militarily and economically. We are one of a handful of countries that have a stockpile of nuclear weapons that can be deployed with pinpoint accuracy anywhere in the world in 15 minutes, a deep water navy capable of having a stand off presence with days, an air force that put ordinance on almost any target and establish air superiority within 24 hours and some of the best trained personnel anywhere in the world. We spend more on our military than the next 5 largest militaries combined. I cannot see any president or a congress in the next 50 years letting a military erode to a point where that becomes a second class force.

    Economically we still control the flow of capital and will continue to do so with our mature capital markets and most importantly strong accounting principles. The Soviet Union collapsed because it could not keep track of how it was spending its money and went broke. China and India both lack a sophisticated accounting system necessary to become a dominate player. The Chinese stock market is still in its infancy with no transparency. In 50 years it is possible that both China and India will be major economic rivals but they will also have to confront the fact that both countries are mineral poor and have unsustainable population growth as it relates to both growing food and providing safe water.

    If Europe even figures out how to get all the countries to cooperate they could become the dominate economic force. With the US supporting a cheap dollar monetary policy the Euro could emerge as the dominate currency for international transactions which will hurt the US economically.
    "You merely adopted the dark. I was born in it,..." -Bane

  22. #22
    Cyburbian safege's avatar
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    Airlines will become ticketless, no employer will give out old fashioned checks, those who don't trust banks will have debit cards forced upon them, and the world economy heads in the direction of being cashless.

    We don't back our favorite faction in Iraqs civil war, and the effort to gain back our credibility on the worlds stage is actually enhanced (much to the irritation of the State Department).

    Pension plans will convert to 401k.

    China will get the lead out.

    A new political party will emerge, it will endorse capitalism (like the Republicans), and encourage economic government regulation (like the Democrats), and they just love planners.

    Automated transit will again be listed as a new trend, and it actually will be a new trend this time.

    Psychotics are consistently inconsistent. The essence of sanity is to be inconsistently inconsistent.
    -Larry Wall

  23. #23
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    It was not Home Depot or Lowes. I called my buddy who was in the garden center and he told me that these guys were hired to help take care of the plants and clean the store.

    Regardless if you agree or not, I live in the Midwest in the United States of America and there is English and Latin on our money, our constitution was written in English, our Declaration of Independence was written in English.

    For someone to get mad at me because I don’t speak Spanish… well there is several things that I could say, but I would get suspended. If you don’t agree with me, I don’t care.

    I think that at a minimum too many Americans have become complaisant regarding things that happen in their own community. People turn a blind eye to crimes in their neighborhoods, the avoid picking up a piece of little of litter on the sidewalk. Pardon my language, but the only way to keep this Country from going to hell is for enough people to actually give a damn.
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

  24. #24
    Cyburbian CJC's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    For someone to get mad at me because I don’t speak Spanish… well there is several things that I could say, but I would get suspended. If you don’t agree with me, I don’t care.
    I don't think anyone here got mad at you for not speaking Spanish. Are you referring to the person at the hardware store? You didn't say before that he got mad at you - if so, he was out of line.

    You offended many here with this phrase:

    Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    That is comparing people to filthy insects. That is offensive.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
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    Not too far from Starbucks
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    Quote Originally posted by CJC View post

    You offended many here with this phrase:

    Illegal immigrants infest our county like cockroaches in a NYC hotel.

    That is comparing people to filthy insects. That is offensive.
    Your right, that was out of line and I apologize for making that statement.

    I do look at Illegal Immigrants in the same light as I do people who rob banks, extort and embezzle funds, and knock off corner liquor stores.

    A friend of mine who does not work too far from Denver Colorado said that 80% of the kids in her class are either foreign born or 1st generation in the US. She is sure knows that several of the parents are not here legally. Yet they find ways to milk the system, get paid under the table, receive assistance from the federal government using fake documentation, and will walk into the Emergency Room for something stupid like a hang nail because they know that the government will pick up the tab since they don’t have insurance. My wife has been an ER nurse for only 7 months now and she said that it is frightening how often an illegal immigrant comes in when half the time a regular doctor visit would have done just fine.

    They are here ILLEGALLY. If they want to live in the US, then they need to do it the correct way.
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

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