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Thread: LEEDS ND

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    Cyburbian tsc's avatar
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    LEEDS ND

    Has anyone read up on LEEDS ND?
    Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
    What is LEED®?

    The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™ is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, and indoor environmental quality.

    LEED provides a roadmap for measuring and documenting success for every building type and phase of a building lifecycle. Specific LEED programs include:


    New Commercial Construction and Major Renovation projects
    Existing Building Operations and Maintenance
    Commercial Interiors projects
    Core and Shell Development projects
    Homes
    Neighborhood Development
    Guidelines for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects
    LEED for Schools
    LEED for Retail
    USGBC is also developing LEED for Healthcare, and LEED

    http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CategoryID=19
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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    LEED-ND is nice, but it is still for developers. It really does not apply to development of a neighborhood plan. I think it missed the mark on that issue. Maybe there will be a LEED for planning someday.
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    ND for planners

    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    LEED-ND is nice, but it is still for developers. It really does not apply to development of a neighborhood plan. I think it missed the mark on that issue. Maybe there will be a LEED for planning someday.
    While ND is certainly aimed at developers, it also has a number of requirements that can (or may have to) in many instances be met by good area planning. These include things like transit proximity, block infrastructure(number of intersections, block sizing, etc.), and stormwater management. While the lastet incarnation of ND, which will be going into the pilot phase soon, tries to make sure the developers can meet most of the credits, there is still a strong emphasis on planning principles that depending on the situation may not be able to be addressed by the developers.

    In Boulder, as part of the redevelopment of a central area about to be infused with high amounts of transit and "revitalized" there has been some attention paid to LEED ND criteria mainly as a list of best practices but also as a tool for green development of the area. The working theory is that if the area plan provides at the very least all the prerequisites and at most a number of the credits included in LEED-ND, developers will be able to more easily claim the credit associated with the hoped for prestige of high level LEED-ND certification.

    There has been some talk of a planning level LEED, but the consensus as far as I've been able to determine is that this needs to happen first. There is a level of certifiaction offered as part of LEED-ND for the planning pre-entitlement phase that can in theory be shown to local governments to help in the approval process, and that may be the best approach to take in the meantime.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by moseyman View post
    While ND is certainly aimed at developers, it also has a number of requirements that can (or may have to) in many instances be met by good area planning. These include things like transit proximity, block infrastructure(number of intersections, block sizing, etc.), and stormwater management. While the lastet incarnation of ND, which will be going into the pilot phase soon, tries to make sure the developers can meet most of the credits, there is still a strong emphasis on planning principles that depending on the situation may not be able to be addressed by the developers.

    In Boulder, as part of the redevelopment of a central area about to be infused with high amounts of transit and "revitalized" there has been some attention paid to LEED ND criteria mainly as a list of best practices but also as a tool for green development of the area. The working theory is that if the area plan provides at the very least all the prerequisites and at most a number of the credits included in LEED-ND, developers will be able to more easily claim the credit associated with the hoped for prestige of high level LEED-ND certification.

    There has been some talk of a planning level LEED, but the consensus as far as I've been able to determine is that this needs to happen first. There is a level of certifiaction offered as part of LEED-ND for the planning pre-entitlement phase that can in theory be shown to local governments to help in the approval process, and that may be the best approach to take in the meantime.
    Pretty much the approach I am using on a project in the Madison area. Unlike the transit center in Boulder, this is a 900 acre greenfield area, bordered on two sides by development and by PDR's or sizeable wetlands on the remainder. It is about 1/2 mile from the traditional downtown. There is some modified New Urban development adjacent in the other direction. LEED-ND is being used as a template and we are developing "talking points" based on it for use in the planning process.
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  5. #5
    I'd say that I'm pretty familiar with LEED-ND, having been just on the outside of the drafting process for the past three or four years. Some within CNU have talked about how LEED-ND could be the starting point for getting "green" certification schemes developed for area plans, comp plans, etc. Some groundwork is being laid for this by CNU members, including a lit review of existing "best practice" comp plans, and a session called "Beyond LEED-ND" to be presented at CNU XV next month.

    So, folks, don't despair, and read up on the document -- in fact, spend an hour running a project you know through it. (It's kind of fun!) In the meantime, it's a great template for developer driven planning, which is much of what passes for planning in the US today.

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    I was looking over the LEED-ND pilot guidelines
    http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=2845
    and realized that of the 106 total possible points, only 2-3 can come specifically from reusing existing buildings. I Given the vast difference in material/energy/labor/impact in building a new buildign vs. using a resource that already exists, I found that unfortunate.

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