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Thread: First Time Soccer Coach

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    First Time Soccer Coach

    I signed up at church to be a soccer coach. I don't know my age group yet, but at most, it would be 5-6 grade boys. They did not have soocer leagues when I was growing up like they do now. However, I did play some pick up games, so I'm not completely ignorant of the game. Any tips, suggestions, etc?
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

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    Cyburbian tsc's avatar
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    I had a couch that didn't play the sport...and she was very good, so you can do just fine. Just make sure you know the rules... and some basic skills. I think at that age, teaching fair play and encouragement will get you far.
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  3. #3
    3 words: google dot com

    3 more: Fox Soccer Channel

  4. #4
    Even though i played in HS and rec league in college, Mrs. G bought me "The Idiot's Guide to Coaching Youth Soccer". It has some good tips in it, practice suggestions, and whatnot. You can have it if you like. PM me.
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  5. #5
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Make sure the kids have fun. Been there, done that. Make sure the kids have fun. Study up, find an assistant coach who knows more you do. Make sure the kids have fun. Oh, and make sure the kids have fun, your rewards are a few years down the road when they come back to tell you what a good experience it was.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  6. #6
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    i coached U-10 girls last spring. it was an experience. here are some tips i picked up:

    1. make sure the parents know that you're all there to have fun and you won't tolerate rude, unsportsmanslike behavior from the kids or the parents.

    2. it is likely you'll get mostly nice parents but there's always one that is going to be overbearing and wants to tell you what you're doing wrong, how they can do it better, and why precious little Meghan doesn't have to follow the rules like everyone else.

    3. keep the kids interested. remember they're young so they're not going to have the longest attention spans. make sure you have a variety of drills for each practice.

    3a. check out Mass Youth Soccer for a list of drills. also like AirGarcia said use google to help search for drills and activities.

    4. at practice try to involve drills that involve all the children. kids are going to goof off while they're waiting in line for a certain drill. if you can come up with drills that reduces the amount of time kids are just standing in line it will be better for everyone's sake.

    5. try to involve the parents. ask for a different parent to bring orange slices, water, etc. for each game.

    6. and the most important advice i can offer is ultimately you're all there to have FUN!! enjoy it!
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian prana's avatar
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    be organized at practice. I've coached my daughter's team, 6-8 year olds and I've also coached high school. Organization is the key. Try to gather other parents to help at practice to keep kids form standing around too. There is nothing worse than having 15 kids stand in line and get to touch the ball once every 4 minutes. It's just WAY too easy for them to start spacing off.

    There are tons of books and entire coaching lessons on the internet if you search. I found one for my first year of high school coaching that broke it down week by week and then practice by practice. It was a great place to start even though I changed it up to fit the skill level, strengths and weaknesses of that particular team.

    And I soon learned that even though I have played for 30 years, including high school, college and even semi-pro after that, parents still think they know more. Start growing that thick skin now!!
    "You can measure the health of a city by the vitality and energy of its streets and public open spaces.”-- William H. Whyte..

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by prana View post

    And I soon learned that even though I have played for 30 years, including high school, college and even semi-pro after that, parents still think they know more. Start growing that thick skin now!!
    What Prana said (and sounds like my background too)! A friend of mine asked recently why I don't coach anymore. I answered simply - "Parents." You should probably have a better stinit with church league soccer.

    At that age, don't worry so much and tactics, work on basic skills. Make it fun.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Been there, done that for 5 seasons. Co-ed teams, 7 to 11 years old. Get some coaching books from your library and copy some fun drills/games, the good books sort them by age groups. I never played soccer, so those books were a great resource. I planned practices like I planned Cub Scout meetings. Always plan more activities than you can accomplish in a practice session, just in case something doesn't work well and you need to move on. Pick drills to improve your worst players, but still things the others will like. One of the favorites, after drills, was having a 15-min scrimmage where I tossed an extra 1 or 2 balls into the game, so the teams had to deal with multiple balls in play. Don't be afraid to be kinda goofy, if it's a rec league.

    An important thing is to see who plays well together, so you can team them up on the field for games. Kids work well in practice, they'll team up well on game day.

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