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Thread: Planning terminology that YOU coined

  1. #26
    Cyburbian
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    I once met a Norwegian planner who called fragmented peri-urban development "piffle"... I assume she meant the Enlish word meaning "nonsense".. unless piffle means something else in Norwegian.

  2. #27
    Cyburbian
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    I'll take credit for the term classical urban renewal as used to differentiate the mid-century slum clearance from the rebuilding done now. I came up with this in light of people insisting that the phrase "urban renewal" be used to describe applications of New Urbanism, despite the fact that the phrase "urban renewal" has a very specific connotation to planners.
    "It's human nature, you can't do anything about that" - Alan Greenspan

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  3. #28
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    PedShed

    I'd like to think it was me who coined PedShed in the early naughties. If not 'coined', then 'popularized'.
    -------
    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

  4. #29
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
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    I was feeling bad because I couldn't think of anything and I felt my life was wasted , but then I reviewed that motivational poster thread and remembered my architectural criticism from a few years ago:

    Stalag Luft Suburban: Residential or commercial developments where the dominant architectural feature is guard towers. In residential areas the guard towers are often freestanding at entrances. In commercial areas the guard towers are often built into the stip centers as a fake parapet or fake second floor on a corner. Stalag Luft Suburban is a more militaristic extension of the common clock tower or lighthouse theme, but without any active uses in the tower other than observation. Also related to the "giant wall and oversize guard shack entrance" residential areas, but with a prison-camp instead of protective vibe. May be symptomatic of overdosing on CPTED theories.

    Actual rendering from a local project. Note the additional pair of towers in the distance.

  5. #30
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by bsteckler View post
    I'll take credit for the term classical urban renewal as used to differentiate the mid-century slum clearance from the rebuilding done now. I came up with this in light of people insisting that the phrase "urban renewal" be used to describe applications of New Urbanism, despite the fact that the phrase "urban renewal" has a very specific connotation to planners.
    This might be a good time to borrow a planning term from across the pond, regeneration, to distinguish current revitalization efforts from old-fashioned slum clearance urban renewal.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  6. #31
    Cyburbian UrbaneSprawler's avatar
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    Alternative Lifestyle Center

    When a developer proposes a "Lifestyle Center" development but is unable to secure the required tenants to meet the Lifestyle Center definition, scrapes the project, and proposes a revised development. Signs you have an Alternative Lifestyle Center: the planned Crate & Barrel is now a Cracker Barrel.

  7. #32
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    The Princess and the Prius

    I'd like to add to the list: Princess and the Prius. I'll start off with the Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale, The Princess and the Pea.

    The story tells of a prince who wants to marry a princess, but is having difficulty finding a suitable wife. Something is always wrong with those he meets, and he cannot be certain they are real princesses. One stormy night .. a young woman drenched with rain seeks shelter in the prince's castle. She claims to be a princess, so the prince's mother decides to test their unexpected guest by placing a pea in the bed she is offered for the night, covered by 20 mattresses and 20 featherbeds. In the morning the guest tells her hosts—in a speech colored with double entendres—that she endured a sleepless night, kept awake by something hard in the bed; which she is certain has bruised her. The prince rejoices. Only a real princess would have the sensitivity to feel a pea through such a quantity of bedding.
    Princess and the Prius is the similar phenomenon, only involving traffic. It's the belief that a tiny, mathematically insignificant increase in traffic from a small project will be as noticeable and unbearable as the pea under 20 mattresses that kept a princess awake in a childhood fairy tale. For example, residents of an established neighborhood with hundreds of homes may demand traffic studies for a very small infill project of 20 houses, believing that the traffic generated will result in unbearable congestion, attract a criminal element, hurt property values, and so on.


    Here's a recent real world example: the belief that a proposed 12,000 square foot Trader Joe's in suburban Buffalo will have a significant impact on traffic on a street with an AADT of 34,500, in an area that now has over two million square feet of retail space.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  8. #33
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Random Traffic Guy View post
    symptomatic of overdosing on CPTED theories.
    hehe. This reminds me of a project I worked on where were at cross-purposes with the client over whether or not the PUD in question should be gated or not (late in the process, their marketing people told them they needed a gate, as the architects and planners we refused to design them one and cautioned that they'd never be able to get it permitted anyway). We reached a compromise for tower-like posts and a manned guard station but without a physical gate or actual restrictions on access.

  9. #34
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by UrbaneSprawler View post
    When a developer proposes a "Lifestyle Center" development but is unable to secure the required tenants to meet the Lifestyle Center definition, scrapes the project, and proposes a revised development. Signs you have an Alternative Lifestyle Center: the planned Crate & Barrel is now a Cracker Barrel.
    A good example of that was the planned redevelopment of the 1950s-era Cedar Center shopping center in South Euclid, Ohio. It was originally planned to be an upscale, mixed use, pedestrian-oriented lifestyle center.





    The Great Recession hit just as the site was cleared. Here's how it ultimately turned out.





    If Cedar Center had a jingle, it would probably be this.

    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    I'd like to add to the list: Princess and the Prius.
    Nice one!

    A recent case of infill development on the border between an urban single-family neighborhood (sic) and the growing urban mid- and high-rise mixed-use area has led me to think about "Amberville" for neighborhoods which are supposed to be enjoyed by their landowners, and admired from the outside, but never, ever changed.

  11. #36
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker View post
    God's Warehouses: High density, typically high rise, dwellings for the low-income elderly. Commonly built, owned, and operated by a unit of local government through assistance from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. Uniformly placed without pedestrian access to any goods or services required by low-income elderly residents. Sucks the life out of rights-of-way when placed in a CBD. "Stockholm" style of architecture predominates.
    When I worked in Arizona the residents of the many nearby Del Web communities (Sun City, Sun City West, Sun City Grand) dubbed themselves "God's Waiting Room" They all knew they were there to have a good time and move on.

    I'm not one of the more creative planners out there (except when using the flying monkey solution) so I could use some help putting a term to this one...
    I believe like all residents that apartment dwellers are all criminals. Many of us have lived in apartments and so were criminals. Once we moved out we were pardoned of all our wrong doings and now like an ex-smoker attack an apartment project.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    "Handlebar survey"

    1979, during my first planning (technician) gig. I was car-free, and really hated using the city pool vehicle for any reason.

    Wrote an article about it, published in Bicycle Forum magazine.

  13. #38
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dvdneal View post
    I'm not one of the more creative planners out there (except when using the flying monkey solution) so I could use some help putting a term to this one...
    I believe like all residents that apartment dwellers are all criminals. Many of us have lived in apartments and so were criminals. Once we moved out we were pardoned of all our wrong doings and now like an ex-smoker attack an apartment project.
    Property Owners (Mortgagers usually) Perogative?

  14. #39
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    I'm pretty sure that Cardinal coined the term "Goditorium," a mega-church building.
    I don't do anything right.

  15. #40
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    I coined Nerd Surge as the antonym for Brain Drain.

    example: New Orleans has experience an economic and demographic shift thanks in part to the Nerd Surge after Katrina.

  16. #41
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    OK, there are two that I feel I played some role in:

    Architectural Determinism: The concept that, if you just get the design right, all the other planning issues will take care of themselves. The Hope VI program in the 1990's was one example (just design the housing right and the problems of public housing will go away). New Urbanism when taken straight with no chaser is another.

    Old Urbanism: The urban fabric we already have and should mend.

  17. #42
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Masswich View post

    Old Urbanism: The urban fabric we already have and should mend.
    I thought i have been using that one since 2003. Another one of my favorites. "The new, old look"

    Replicating designs from the turn of the century circa 1900's with new faux material and finishes.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

  18. #43
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    I think we have all used Old Urbanism at one point or another.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  19. #44
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    How about hippie urbanism? Some defining traits:

    * Intentional lack of property maintenance, or lack of polish and attention to details -- weeds poking through the driveway, foundation, etc.
    * Front yard and tree lawn areas have flower/vegetable gardens, or grow wild. Mowed/trimmed grass and formal landscaping is rare.
    * Vacant lots remain so, not because it's urban prairie, but because the owners won't sell despite high demand and high land prices. They place a very high value on their "open space", veggie garden, etc, despite choosing to live in a dense urban setting.
    * New development often incorporates "natural" random setbacks, building orientation, and so on for its own sake.
    * Dirt or gravel driveways, even in an urban setting.
    * Plenty of community gardens and urban permaculture.

    Generally, blurry lines between nature and the built environment on a micro scale, despite its urban setting.

    Examples of hippie urbanism: Fall Creek in Ithaca; South Austin; Nederland, Colorado.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  20. #45
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Fugu urbanism. A bit of a background: from Wikipedia,

    Fugo urbanism describes cities where there's not just good neighborhoods and bad, but a frequent pattern of good blocks intermingled among the bad, and bad blocks among the good.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  21. #46
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Fugu urbanism. A bit of a background: from Wikipedia,

    Fugo urbanism describes cities where there's not just good neighborhoods and bad, but a frequent pattern of good blocks intermingled among the bad, and bad blocks among the good.
    I'm missing the connection to a Japanese fish...

  22. #47
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    I'm missing the connection to a Japanese fish...
    The poisonous parts of the fish have to be delicately removed from the edible parts and prevent contamination. The problem blocks have be to delicately removed from the good blocks and prevent contamination.

    I totally get this concept. My hometown is a rural, relatively isolated small city that is the center of a mircopolitan region with a stable but stagnant economy. This phenomenon of "good" mixed closely with "bad" even drills down to the house by house scale.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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  23. #48
    Cyburbian Plan_F's avatar
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    Crapplication

    Crapplication (krăp li-kāshən) n. 1. A land use change request form, which is tendered with insufficient information. 2. A land use change request document or petition that is illegible or makes no sense or seems without rhyme or reason. 3. A land use change request document or petition that rhymes but lacks reason else-other. 4. An application that stinks. 5. Any application that is just crap.

    [ Middle English crappe chaff from Middle Dutch crappecrappen to tear off + Middle English applicacioun from Latin applicātiōapplicāre to apply. The modern term is thought to be closely related to Craptastic, as in the phrase, "This application is just flipping craptastic"]



    P.S. I dig Godatorium and Handlebar survey and Alternative Lifestyle Center, and Stalag Luft Suburban just about made me ship my pants to St. Elsewhere. (The poster drives it home.)

  24. #49
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Plan_F View post
    Crapplication (krăp’ li-kāshən) n. 1. A land use change request form, which is tendered with insufficient information. 2. A land use change request document or petition that is illegible or makes no sense or seems without rhyme or reason. 3. A land use change request document or petition that rhymes but lacks reason else-other. 4. An application that stinks. 5. Any application that is just crap.
    Good one.
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    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

  25. #50
    Cyburbian Dave F's avatar
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    This isn't one that really qualifies as making up terminology, but I remember when 10 or so years ago, I used the phrase "high density sprawl" to refer to the development pattern around I-66 in Northern Virginia when speaking to peers. Many of them acted like I blew their darn minds with the idea that sprawl could be high density, or that dense areas could be sprawling. Does anyone have a better term for what I am describing?

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