Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Vehicle-mounted advertising: please help!!

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    6

    Vehicle-mounted advertising: please help!!

    I'm working on possibly re-defining a Sign Definition for a City or amending their Code. There is a nuisance with trailers being parked on private property displaying large banners for advertising. Does anyone have any experience in this? Please let me know. I'm open to suggestions. Thanks!

    Moderator note:
    Please don't shout. Especially not in thread titles. Thanks and carry on.

  2. #2
    An illegal sign is an illegal sign. Period. If it violates the code, then cite it the way you would were it a permanent sign, installed illegally.

    Off-topic:
    What I am starting to see are purpose-built vehicles that are rolling advertising signs, driving around on the public rights-of-way. Those, I think, will be impossible to regulate.
    Je suis Charlie

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    6

    You're right

    I agree with you on citing as it fits. If it does violate code, then write it out basically.

    As you mentioned they now have "mobile" billboards which is similar to my situation. It's not necessarily being driven around but it does have the potential to do so.

    Basically there are trailers that are being stored on a lot which backs to a major freeway. The fence is a chain-link fence so passers can see these advertisements easily. As you can imagine, these vinyl banners get rather large, enough to cover an entire trailer that is normally towed by a 16-wheeler.

    Have you heard of any issues of that sort? Thanks, I appreciate it.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Upper left edge
    Posts
    4,287
    We have a code provision that includes the following among the list of prohibited signs:

    Signs on parked vehicles. Signs placed on or affixed to vehicles and/or trailers which are parked on a public right-of-way, public property, or private property so as to be visible from a public right-of-way where the apparent purpose is to display the sign. However, this is not in any way intended to prohibit signs placed on or affixed to or in the windows of vehicles and trailers, such as lettering on motor vehicles, where the sign is incidental to the primary use of the vehicle or trailer.

    Not the best drafted piece, but we have had success with it in municipal court.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    9,036
    Blog entries
    2
    Here is a Code Piece from an old employer that covers this:

    18.50.075 Business vehicle identification signs.
    A. Due to their aesthetic and economic impact, especially along business corridors and other major
    streets and highways, the following specific regulations for signs on business vehicles are
    necessary to carry out the purposes of this chapter. The following specific regulations shall not
    be applicable to signs on government and emergency vehicles. Business vehicle identification
    signs shall comply with the following standards:
    1. The vehicle, trailer, or semi-trailer (vehicle) to which a business vehicle identification sign is
    mounted, painted or otherwise affixed; (i) must be regularly used to provide the services or
    products offered by the business with which the sign is related; (ii) must be used for the
    regular operation of the business; and (iii) must not be primarily used to display signage.
    2. The vehicle to which a business vehicle identification sign is mounted, painted or otherwise
    affixed must be parked on the business premises with which the sign is related and in no case
    any closer than 50 feet to the public right-of-way; provided that if there is no parking on the
    business premises, the vehicle shall be legally parked.
    3. A business vehicle identification sign shall not project more than one (1) foot above the
    roofline of the vehicle to which it is mounted, painted, or otherwise affixed.
    4. It shall not be a violation of this Section 18.50.075 if the vehicle to which a business vehicle
    sign is mounted, painted or otherwise affixed is being used to travel home from work and is
    temporarily parked at or near the vehicle operator's residence or is otherwise temporarily
    parked way from the business premises while being used to provide the business' services or
    products or as personal transportation for the vehicle operator. (Ord. 4219 1 (part), 1996)
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    6

    Very appreciated

    Otis & zmanPlan, I really appreciate the information, and please be assured that it will help me a great deal. By any chance, would you be able to tell me what code the two of you cited? If I'll be reporting to my boss, I'll need some credibility, of course. But thank you two nonetheless.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    9,036
    Blog entries
    2
    My previous post referenced Title 18.50.075 of the Municipal Code for the City of Loveland, Colorado.

    This can be found online here: HERE

    Glad to help. Make sure you stick around the board and join the fun!
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  8. #8
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,672
    Blog entries
    3
    From a UDC I wrote (Oakland, Florida):

    411.5 Prohibited signs

    The following signs are prohibited in all districts, unless noted.

    [snip]

    * Signs placed on vehicles and trailers which are parked and used primarily as a sign.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    6
    I appreciate it Dan, thanks!

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Megalopolis
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    From a UDC I wrote (Oakland, Florida):

    I would modify the above so as to ban moving, roving billboard trucks as well as parked trailers (here in Florida these are more and more common)

    See the article below:

    Don Dunavent (left) and Armand Dauplaise of Palm Tree Mobile Billboards in Oviedo display a billboard truck that broadcasts ever-changing ads on 3 sides with more than 500,000 LED lights. A company driver has been ticketed. (SARA A. FAJARDO, ORLANDO SENTINEL / January 11, 2008)

    Sandra Pedicini | Sentinel Staff Writer

    February 13, 2008

    Advertisers like Palm Tree Mobile Billboards.

    The Oviedo company displays electronic ads on trucks that roam Central Florida's roads. The signs can change images every few seconds, grabbing potential customers' attention.

    Problem is, they grab law enforcement's attention, too. Palm Tree Mobile Billboards has filed one lawsuit against Orange County Sheriff Kevin Beary and another against the head of Florida's Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles in response to traffic tickets written because of lights on the company's trucks.

    Florida Highway Patrol and Orange County sheriff's officials said they would not comment on the pending lawsuits.

    A Palm Tree truck driver was cited on two occasions under a state statute that forbids flashing and blue lights on vehicles under many circumstances.

    Palm Tree says it's being discriminated against and is asking for a judge to clarify that the state statute does not apply to its vehicles.

    A hearing on the Orange County case is scheduled for Thursday. Palm Tree officials say the 1971 statute, written long before LED technology came on the scene, was meant to crack down on drivers impersonating police officers, not on moving high-tech billboards.

    There is also confusion about whether local city ordinances banning electronic signs extend to the trucks.

    "The technology has leapt ahead of the regulations," said Kevin Fry, president of a national nonprofit advocacy group called Scenic America. "I think very few communities, probably, have sign ordinances that specifically address giant television screens rolling around on trucks."

    Mobile advertising has become big business, but some drivers consider it distracting and ugly. Environmentalists don't like that gallons of fuel are burned by trucks that are only carrying advertising.

    Some governments have banned mobile advertising or are considering doing so. Hawaii, which prohibits traditional billboards throughout the state, passed a law in 2006 extending its ban to vehicles used primarily to display paid advertisements.

    Electronic ads on wheels have even more potential to distract drivers, critics say.

    "We think these things are extraordinarily dangerous," Fry said. "What could be more distracting than a digital billboard driving right next to your car?"

    Doug Jones disagrees.

    "It's something you glance at as you're driving. I'm not sure I consider it a big distraction," said Jones, an Altamonte Springs resident who has seen the mobile ads on the road.

    While Palm Tree officials say they have a patent pending for their particular brand of technology, some companies across the country also advertise LED billboards and video on vehicles.

    Paul Rosarius, chief executive officer of Palm Tree Computer Systems in Oviedo, started his mobile-advertising venture just last year. Palm Tree Mobile Billboards has two trucks with LED billboards that drive around Central Florida, often spending time in front of businesses at busy intersections and visiting special events.

    The company also has trucks in the Atlanta area and is preparing to do business in Las Vegas, chief operating officer Armand Dauplaise said.

    Palm Tree driver Anthony Williams received a ticket near Casselberry in September when an FHP trooper cited him under a state statute that prohibits flashing lights on vehicles that aren't used for public safety. Palm Tree said in its lawsuit that its trucks do not have flashing lights.

    Williams got another ticket in December, this one from an Orange County sheriff's deputy on the University of Central Florida campus. The deputy said the truck violated a portion of the statute forbidding blue lights on most vehicles. Williams also got a citation for sound coming from the truck that was deemed too loud. Dauplaise said Palm Tree's trucks use sound only when they are not moving.

    Dauplaise said until the legal issues are resolved, Palm Tree's Central Florida trucks are operating under a new policy when driving: Screens on the back either are blank or don't display changing images.

    Palm Tree officials note its trucks drive only on roads with a 45 mph or lower speed limit. At night and in the rain, they say, the lighting is dimmed. "We want to be viewed as good guys in the community," Dauplaise said.

    Officials in Central Florida cities that restrict electronic signs have different opinions about whether advertising trucks are included.

    Officials in Casselberry said they don't think their city's temporary ban on electronic signs, enacted last year, would apply to the trucks. But officials in Orlando and Lake Mary said they think their cities' rules would prohibit such signs on trucks.

    Writing citations could be difficult because the trucks are often on the move, said Mike Rhodes, Orlando's division manager for code enforcement.

    Dauplaise said Palm Tree just wants to clarify that it has a right to use its technology on the road.

    "We simply want the statute to be made right."

  11. #11
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,672
    Blog entries
    3
    Quote Originally posted by LMJ View post
    I would modify the above so as to ban moving, roving billboard trucks as well as parked trailers (here in Florida these are more and more common)
    Would that even be possible? I would think it's more of a traffic issue than a zoning issue; a moving billboard truck usually isn't parked for any time on a property. Granted, it's advertising in the public right-of-way, which most zoning codes prohibit (bandit signs, etc), but how is the ad on a billboard truck different than ... oh, a wrapped bus or some other form of transit advertising?


+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 2
    Last post: 27 Jan 2012, 2:57 PM
  2. Stupid advertising gimmicks
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 25
    Last post: 22 Aug 2007, 1:53 PM
  3. Advertising?
    Cyburbia Issues and Help
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 29 Mar 2007, 7:46 PM
  4. Fantastic Advertising Campaigns
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 12
    Last post: 02 Mar 2006, 5:47 PM
  5. roof mounted antennas
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 30 Jul 2002, 9:37 AM