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Thread: Local and regional mispronunciations

  1. #26
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN View post
    What about wor-sh instead of wash. I had a teacher in HS that even said wush pronounced like "rush".
    That screams "Appalachia".

    I remember one time, driving through southern Virginia, scanning across the AM band and stopping to hear an old school fire-and-brimstone-y'all-goin'-to-hell preacher.

    "When JUH-HEE-UH-SUH-HUS rizzed up from his grave ...
    "Ya'll rizz up ... rizzup now and sing Onward Christian Soldiers"

    Rizz = rise. Rissed up = rose up. Never heard that anywhere else before or since. I have heard every letter in "Jesus" pronounced as individual syllables many times, though.

    I won't get into the Buffalo eyacksint, where "and" and "that" are two syllable words.

  2. #27
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    My grandmother, from western Pennsylvania, has some odd pronunciations for some words. Eagle is "Igle", League is "Lig", Legal is "ligal", etc.

  3. #28
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    ...afterwards I'll go to Hudson's to return that sweater. ..."
    I thought that Hudson's was formerly pronounced like "Marshall Field's" and now "Macy's." (We lost our Detroit-based department store chain some years ago.)

    Mackinac Bridge and Island are pronounced like the lower peninsula Mackinaw.

    Nacogdoches in Texas is phonetic (if you can speak Spanish words). The same town in Louisiana is, roughly, "nack-a-dish."

  4. #29
    Between California where I grew up and Boston where I live now, there are so many mispronunciations that its hard to know where to start.

    There is a town called Los Gatos pronounced Las Gatus
    San Jose is one word Sannazay
    Locals refer to a major street as "The El Camino"

    Besides the obvious Bostonisms, there is
    "So arn't I"

    Visitors always want to say COPEly square. Not Copley square. grrrrr.

    But the best strange language I ever heard was a Southern woman who said of another person, "She always enjoyed poor health."

  5. #30
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Since I come from northwest Indiana, where do I begin.. The worst one that I remember is Don and Dawn are pronounced the same,. You have the hear it to understand. More than anything is the flow and rythm of the language. Up there, people speak in word burst-like a verbal machine gun.
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  6. #31
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Oh Boy. This is a fun topic. I have a real penchant for local (or something like "loewcoo" in the Philly/South Jersey/Chesapeake Bay region) pronunciation.

    In Philly (and surrounding areas), people would say:
    Werter (instead of water)
    Hoewme (instead of home - applies to all long "o" sounds)
    Stek (instead of steak, like "Youse wanna goew git a cheese stek? or just a hoewgie?")
    Scullions (instead of scallions)
    Begel (instead of bagel)
    Pelluh (instead of pillow)
    Shoewa (instead of shore - "youse goewin down da shoewa?")
    And so many more. This area is inflicted with the use of, among other things, the Welsh "l" in which your tongue never quite touches the roof of your mouth. It results in a lot of words that sound like they are being swallowed - its almost a w sound. Like the unfortunately named "Quality Toyota" dealership that comes out "Quawitee Toyoewtuh")

    Texas was wonderful for this stuff, too. For all the Spanish speaking folks around, it was amazing how few Anglos could pronounce Spanish words correctly. It seemed almost deliberate to me. People would say:
    Guadaloop (instead of Guadalupe)
    San Jasinto (instead of "San Haseento")
    Perdinalis (instead of Pedernales)

    In New Mexico, most people take pride in trying to pronounce Spanish words as correctly as possible - especially if they have come from outside of the state (like me). This is a little out of hand, too, with all the over-pronouncing going on, but at least people are making an effort. I can't think of too many from here at the moment, except people saying "riadoso" for the town "ruidoso."
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  7. #32
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Maister mentioned the most egregious here in the Great Lakes region - the "s" at the end of store names

    Off-topic:
    I'm sorry, but the Boston/Rhode Island accent makes my brain want to explode.

    Thanks, Afflecks for putting it into entire movies.
    Last edited by mendelman; 12 Mar 2008 at 2:05 PM.
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  8. #33

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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Texas was wonderful for this stuff, too. For all the Spanish speaking folks around, it was amazing how few Anglos could pronounce Spanish words correctly. It seemed almost deliberate to me. People would say:
    Guadaloop (instead of Guadalupe)
    San Jasinto (instead of "San Haseento")
    Perdinalis (instead of Pedernales)
    I visited Decatur, Illinois once, a city smack in the middle of Illinois. They have a main street called El Dorado Avenue, and the locals pronounce it "el-der-RAY-da".

  9. #34
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    What is the correct pronunciation of Beaufort?
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  10. #35
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Texas was wonderful for this stuff, too. For all the Spanish speaking folks around, it was amazing how few Anglos could pronounce Spanish words correctly. It seemed almost deliberate to me. People would say:
    Guadaloop (instead of Guadalupe)
    San Jasinto (instead of "San Haseento")
    Perdinalis (instead of Pedernales)
    A few years after I moved to Texas, the Honorable William P. Clements, better known as Bill, became Governor. He was a native and hugely successful in the "awl bidness" but his Spanish (and English) was the stuff of legends. After 20+ years, I still cringe thinking about him introducing "Ma gud fren, the Guvner of the Meskin Stite of TAM-Al--Leep-ASS (Tamaulipas).
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  11. #36
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I grew up In Syracuse and then lived in Boston for 16 years after college so I have a really weird accent

    I swallow some words and have long aaaaaa's on others but then I often drop or re-work an r from the alphabet too - very weird....

    for example:

    Syracuse:
    aunt is ant
    potatoes is padada's


    North suburban Boston (not to be confused with the south shore, please)
    dark is daaaaak
    draw is drawer

    I do find a super strong accent that I'm not used to hearing anymore (thus making it strong) to be a little painful or distracting, as in I listen to the accent and not the message

    but I do miss radio/tv announcers having accents - that's just a tragedy

  12. #37
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    In New Mexico, most people take pride in trying to pronounce Spanish words as correctly as possible - especially if they have come from outside of the state (like me). This is a little out of hand, too, with all the over-pronouncing going on, but at least people are making an effort. I can't think of too many from here at the moment, except people saying "riadoso" for the town "ruidoso."
    This takes me back to my Las Cruces years, where news announcers and Hispanophiles would overpronounce Spanish place and street names; not just simple "Nicaragua on public radio" overpronunciation, but saying the word louder, and adding rolling Rs where there aren't normally present. Thus, instead of "Las Cruces", you'd often hear Las CahRRRRRROses

  13. #38
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by KSharpe View post
    What is the correct pronunciation of Beaufort?
    Planit provided the answer.
    Quote Originally posted by Planit
    Beaufort, NC = BO-fort
    Beaufort, SC = BU-fert
    There are Marine bases near both towns and I lived near both towns. He's right, they really do pronounce it differently depending where you're at.

    Quote Originally posted by Dan
    and those who were very much into their Hispanic identity would overpronounce Spanish place and street names
    wasn't there an SNL skit during the Phil Hartman era about this sort of thing (LA=LohZahnjayleez). Any youtube searchers?...
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  14. #39
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Texas was wonderful for this stuff, too. For all the Spanish speaking folks around, it was amazing how few Anglos could pronounce Spanish words correctly. It seemed almost deliberate to me. People would say:
    Guadaloop (instead of Guadalupe)
    San Jasinto (instead of "San Haseento")
    Perdinalis (instead of Pedernales)
    These pronunciations may have began as Anglo butchering, but now are actually the accepted proper pronunciations for those places. Also, Llano, TX is pronounced with an English "L" sound rather than the Spanish "LL", and I'm sure there are numerous other places where the butchered Spanish is now the official pronunciation. Perhaps not in New Mexico, but definitely in California and Texas.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    wasn't there an SNL skit during the Phil Hartman era about this sort of thing (LA=LohZahnjayleez). Any youtube searchers?...
    1990 - with Jimmy Smits. Transcript here. No youtube (that I could find).

    Kathy: Well.. I think Neek-o-rah-gwa is important. But not just Neek-o-rah-gwa but, also.. Han-der-us! And, especially.. El Salv-uh-door!

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    Executive #2: Excuse me, everybody, I'd like you to meet our new Economics correspondent.. Han-toe-nee-o Man-dos-ah!

    Antonio Mendoza: Or.. Antonio Mendoza.

    Kathy: Oh, it's nice to meet you, Han-toe-nee-o!

    Dan: I'm sorry. Is it Man-dos-ah? Or Min-doz-ah?

    Antonio Mendoza: Mendoza.. just Mendoza.
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  16. #41
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Unless you have lived Appalachia, you can't talk. A small KY town is called Yo-se-mite.

  17. #42
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Upstate New York has a lot of oddly pronounced names.

    Here, Berlin is BER-lin, not Ber-LIN.
    Greenwich is GREEN-witch - not like GREN-itch Village in NYC.
    Chili, outside Rochester, is apparently CHI-LIE, not like chili as in peppers.

    People who aren't from around here often have difficulty with Native American place names, but even I can't pronounce Irondequoit My mouth just can't handle it.

    I had to ask to find out that Staunton, Virginia is in fact pronounced STAN-ton.

    And that Beaufort, NC vs. Beaufort, SC is very confusing to a non-Southerner like me.

  18. #43
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    In southern Indiana, and other parts of the state:
    Milan--MY-lann
    Versailles--VURR-sales, or sometimes VUR-sah-lees
    Russiaville--ROOSHA-ville
    Vevay--VEE-vee
    and
    Indianapolis--Ind-da-NAP-o-lis. The emphasis on "Nap" is entirely un-ironic, and pretty common.
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  19. #44
    Cyburbian CJC's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TexanOkie View post
    These pronunciations may have began as Anglo butchering, but now are actually the accepted proper pronunciations for those places. Also, Llano, TX is pronounced with an English "L" sound rather than the Spanish "LL", and I'm sure there are numerous other places where the butchered Spanish is now the official pronunciation. Perhaps not in New Mexico, but definitely in California and Texas.
    Another example of this from California is the city of Vallejo. It's pronounced using the English "L" sound instead of the Spanish "LL", but the Spanish "J" sound. So, Va-Lay-Ho.

  20. #45
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TexanOkie View post

    From Oklahoma:

    Chickasha - CHICK-uh-shay
    Hobart - HOE-bert
    Altus - AL-tus (not "AHL-tus")
    Chautauqua - shuh-TAH-kwa
    Stoops - GOD
    You forgot Miami, OK... my AH ma

    Oh, and just a tip for those who don't know... Oregon is (or ah gun) not (or E gone)!
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  21. #46
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    My wife (raised in North Idaho) taught me that Moscow, ID is prounouced Moss-Co, while Moss-Cow is in Russia.

    She also refers to Boise with the "s" being pronouced as an "s", while I pronounce the "s" as a "z".
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    Me: Boy-zee
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  22. #47
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Anyone ever heard of the state called illinoize?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  23. #48

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    One way to tell someone is not from Detroit (de-TROYT) is to hear someone say "DEE-troyt".

    Also, it's not uncommon to hear a Chicagoan pronounce the name of the city as "sha-KAW-ga".

  24. #49
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by pete-rock View post
    One way to tell someone is not from Detroit (de-TROYT) is to hear someone say "DEE-troyt".
    True.

    Anyone ever hear someone from West Virginia refer to that city near the Ohio-Michigan border as TOO-LEE-DOO. I have.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  25. #50
    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN View post
    My wife (raised in North Idaho) taught me that Moscow, ID is prounouced Moss-Co, while Moss-Cow is in Russia.
    Hate to correct your missus, but "there are no cows in Moscow" is taught to television journalists so they learn to pronounce it properly, which is the same as your wife pronounces Moscow, ID.

    Here's one for luckless ped: there's a lake in northern Maine named Chemquasibamticook. Good luck wrapping your mouth around that pissah!

    plannerbabs Great to see you, stranger! And you are absolutely correct about vee-vee (spelled Vevay), Indiana.
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