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Thread: Pedestrian-oriented / pedestrian-generating activities and permitted uses (zoning)

  1. #1
    Member
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    san francisco, ca
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    Pedestrian-oriented / pedestrian-generating activities and permitted uses (zoning)

    Hello,

    I am a future planning student helping someone in my small town analyze the current downtown business zoning ordinances. We are trying to find "best practices" for pedestrian-oriented businesses that can apply to a coastal, somewhat tourist-dependent town.

    The challenge is to re-create the definition to encourage year-round pedestrian use and continue to support tourism - so trying to figure out what the line between different types of "professional" uses is.

    Direction to any existing research, case studies or economic analysis would be awesome!!

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    From the Land Use element of a draft of a comp plan I wrote for a small village:

    LOW-TRAFFIC OFFICE AND SERVICE USES IN RETAIL STOREFRONTS

    The north side of Main Street in the village center is lined with commercial buildings that front onto the sidewalk. The south side of the street is fronted by ******* Public Square; houses built in the 19th century, some of which are used for businesses such as coffee shops and offices; and a funeral home parking lot.

    In the village center, many storefronts are occupied by offices and other non-retail and non-restaurant uses. Of the 28 retail storefronts in the village center, 11 are occupied by offices, institutional uses, and services that have low foot traffic counts. The presence of these uses lowers the amount of activity at the street level, and undermines the role of the village center as a “third place.”

    This plan recommends restricting institutional, office and service uses that generate little or no pedestrian traffic to upper floors and secondary frontages (ground floor space that does not front directly on the street). Examples of such uses include dog grooming, medical and professional offices, martial arts studios, photography studios, printing shops, appliance repair, auto parts sales, mobility aid sales, and sales of goods not intended for general consumers.

    Uses permitted to occupy primary frontage (ground floor space that fronts directly on a street) of a building, should be limited to those that generate a high level of customer traffic throughout the day, and create a dynamic of community interaction. Examples of uses promoting street animation include restaurants, coffee houses, banks, barber and beauty shops, gift stores, art studios, book stores, florists, antique stores, hardware stores, clothing stores, jewelry stores, and video rental outlets.

    Table 4.2

    Village center storefronts

    Use Number Traffic generator
    Accountant 1 No
    Antique/”kountry” gift shop 2 Yes
    Barber shop 1 Yes
    Bead shop 1 Yes
    Coffee shop 2 Yes
    Construction/building trades 3 No
    Dentist 2 No
    Florist 1 Yes
    Hobby shop 1 Yes
    Insurance agent 1 No
    Laundromat 1 Yes
    Martial arts studio 1 Maybe
    Mortgage broker 1 No
    New age bookstore/gift shop 1 Yes
    Photography studio 1 No
    Real estate agent 1 No
    Restaurant/diner 3 Yes
    Tavern/bar 1 Yes
    Vacant 3 No
    The following is from a unified development code I write several years ago for the community where I worked. The code is somewhat different because it doesn't include long lists of permitted uses in vvarious zoning district categories, but rather uses a large table with all districts and permitted/conditional uses. The code also includes definitions of various uses, conditions, and the districts where they are permitted. I arranged the code like to make it more user-friendly; I found that more people asked "I want to [do something]. Where can I do it?" rather than "I have a piece of property. What can go there?"

    303.6 C-V Commercial – village (formerly C-2)

    The C-V district allows development and uses contributing to the creation of mixed use, pedestrian oriented “village centers” in the heart of ******** Townsite; and along collector streets in large, master planned developments following a traditional village or “new urban” model. Lofts, live-work units, and offices are encouraged to locate above ground-floor “light commercial” retail and services that will encourage strolling and generate foot traffic. Appropriate site and building design is required to de-emphasize the presence of the automobile, and complement existing or planned adjacent residential development.
    304.13 Uses promoting street animation in the C-V district

    Uses generating little or no pedestrian traffic undermine the “village center” environment the C-V district intends to promote. In the C-V district, for a primary frontage (ground floor space that fronts directly on a street) of a building, only uses that generate a high level of customer traffic throughout the day, and create a dynamic of community interaction, with façades and storefronts that attract and promote pedestrian interest, are permitted. Residences, offices and services are permitted on upper floors and secondary frontages (ground floor space that does not front directly on the street).

    Examples of uses promoting street animation include restaurants, cafes, coffee houses, banks, barber and beauty shops, gift stores, art studios, book stores, florists, antique stores, hardware stores, convenience stores, clothing stores, card stores, jewelry stores, and video rental outlets.

    Examples of uses more appropriate for upper floors and secondary frontages include dog grooming, medical and dental offices, engineer and surveyor offices, martial arts studios, mortgage brokers, title agencies, photography studios, printing shops, appliance repair, food catering, auto parts sales, janitorial supply sales, and sales of goods not intended for general consumers.

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