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Thread: Feedback after applying/before interviewing

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Feedback after applying/before interviewing

    In my experience, it's rare for any agency, company, or other hiring entity to provide the basic courtesy of acknowledging an application. Perhaps 30% of them ever get back to me. Anyone else?

    I am considering including a self-addressed stamped postcard just to help make it convenient for them. Comments, managers?

    Surprisingly, one of my hoped-for jurisdictions recently sent a letter explaining that their previously advertised position was on hold. It's been so long that I can't recall the time frame or the circumstances. They are remarkably good about staying in touch, which is one of the reasons I'd like to work for them (again...layoff).

  2. #2
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    I was looking for jobs last year and applied for many local jobs. I interviewed at some places and never heard from others. I took a position in November and went on my way.

    February comes (5 months after I applied to most places) and I got a letter telling me that I wasn't chosen for a position. Seriously? What good does that do me now? I guess it was nice to know that I wasn't on their list of candidates, but a letter 5 months later. Is this courtesy?

    I agree with Veloise, shouldn't there be some standard that allows a prospective applicant to know their application was at least read and reviewed. Then getting a letter 5 months later would at least be funny instead of odd and out of the blue.
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Where I work (and we do not have a real HR department), we do not send out letters indicating that that an application has been received.

    However, after the initial applicants have been dwindled down to those that we want to interview, we will send a letter indicating that you have not been selected for an interview.

    Veloise - I'm sure a lot of the local governments struggle with time/money issues and the $0.41, plus the cost of the envelope, paper, printing, etc. multiplied by just say 100 applicants, starts to add up money wise. At a time when the powers that be are telling their employees to cut costs wherever they can, things like this happen.

    Sending a self-addressed stamped envelope along may be a good idea and may get you the letter. However, some may be put off by the over-zealousness of needing to immediately know where you stand. There's a fine line between really wanting a position and pestering people about a position. Unfortunately, some potential employess do not like the pestering kind, no matter how good their resume may look.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Jen's avatar
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    But then again, when you are just one of the bulging mass of applicants, you have to do something positive to stand out in the field. What is it? personal delivery of app materials, one, two or three follow-up calls or letters, a insider's personal recommendation, letters of reference included with application?

    And I do agree that HR leadership in local governance is sadly not a priority. Checks and balances you know. Even a little HR training doled out by their planning consultants could help out in a lot ways with employee relations, EOE, hiring /firing etiquette.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jen View post
    And I do agree that HR leadership in local governance is sadly not a priority. Checks and balances you know. Even a little HR training doled out by their planning consultants could help out in a lot ways with employee relations, EOE, hiring /firing etiquette.
    Jen - this is very true. Most local goverments probably don't even have a real HR person. Much of the hiring process is done through the department head, with oversight from Administration, personnel committee, etc. Because of this informality, much of the process is very ad hoc.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    In April 2002 I learned of an available position with a large city planning dept, one with an HR department. I sent my app in as soon as it was officially posted (late summer?).
    My first day was April 2003. Yes, the interviewing & screening process took a year.
    My first contact with HR was in about January, and their first question was, "are you still interested?" Seems they'd had many applicants fall out.

    Now I am thinking of including a blank SASP (postcard) for future use by the powers that hire.
    I can come up with several amusing options for a checklist, probably best to not offer one.

    [ ] Still trying to find the HR desk under the flood of applications
    [ ] We don't want you
    [ ] We might want you
    [ ] If the director's nephew doesn't work out...

  7. #7
    Cyburbian transguy's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Veloise - I'm sure a lot of the local governments struggle with time/money issues and the $0.41, plus the cost of the envelope, paper, printing, etc. multiplied by just say 100 applicants, starts to add up money wise. At a time when the powers that be are telling their employees to cut costs wherever they can, things like this happen.
    I would be more than satisfied with a mass e-mail. There could be two versions (1) You were not selected, and (2) you were not chosen, however, we would like to keep your information on file. This is faster and cheaper. What do the others think about response via e-mail? Especially when I apply for 90% of positions electronically. Save the stamp and still pass on the information.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by transguy View post
    I would be more than satisfied with a mass e-mail. There could be two versions (1) You were not selected, and (2) you were not chosen, however, we would like to keep your information on file. This is faster and cheaper. What do the others think about response via e-mail? Especially when I apply for 90% of positions electronically. Save the stamp and still pass on the information.
    I think this makes more sense than a letter, especially as how most people now have access to email. And the database for the mass email could easily be created as each new resume/application comes in.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    I guess this fits here...

    Private firm called me for an interview today. I have no recollection of applying to any of their postings within the last several years.

    Checked all my outboxes and Sent folders. Nope, did not apply.

    Someone on here doing me a favor, or what?

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