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Thread: General info on working in Australia

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    California Central Coast
    Posts
    59

    General info on working in Australia

    Hi! I will be graduating with my bachelors in Community & Regional Planning in May 2009 and have become increasingly interested in working in Australia. I have always wanted to work abroad and have focused my efforts on Australia.

    I am a US citizen and was wondering if this hindered my chances at all. I know obtaining a job abroad is fairly difficult but I was hoping to get some input from people who have done it.

    I know the APA has "mentor" program but does PIA have something similar as well?

    Also, I know resumes are different in Australia... would it be worth tailoring it to their customs?

    What is the general application process for jobs in Australia?

    I'm sorry for all of the questions. Basically, if anyone has any input on working in Australia, I would be most grateful!

  2. #2
         
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    City of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    20

    Immigartion-Additional Details

    Hi Cindyg86,

    If you take a look at the thread referring to Employment Opportunities in West Australia, you will find some helpful discussion. I am an American city planner who has made the journey and can tell you that it is well worth it once you go through the migration process.

    I have no doubt that there are plenty of employment opportunities here for you but it is critical to obtain the right to live and work here before applying for a position. At the Australian Immigration website, peruse the various migration paths. Check out the referral list for authorised Migration Agents as these professionals can offer advice to which type of migration is best for you. Although there is a fee involved, you could potentially save valuable time in going though the process.

    Relative to the issue of the resume, over here it is noted as a CV and it is generally more in-depth when it comes to showing how you are qualified to specific tasks. When in the US, I was continually reminded by HR that potential employers wanted three things-cover letter, a single page resume, and references. In Australia, you should prepare a cover letter and prepare a CV of reasonable length (3-5 pages... NOT a phone directory thick document). It may be worthwhile to search the web for sample CV's which will give you an idea of what they look like.

    Best wishes for a bright future!

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Rem's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,530
    Also cindy you should look for the working holiday scheme Australia has in place. Rather than taking the plunge to immigrate, younger people (I think the cut off is maybe 25, could be older) can come and work over here to get a taste of life and work. It is predominately designed for backpackers who want to work their way around the country doing less skilled work, but there would be no barrier to you picking up some casual planning work using the same scheme.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2008
    Location
    vancouver, BC, Canada
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    Quote Originally posted by Siskiyou View post
    Hi Cindyg86,

    If you take a look at the thread referring to Employment Opportunities in West Australia, you will find some helpful discussion. I am an American city planner who has made the journey and can tell you that it is well worth it once you go through the migration process.

    I have no doubt that there are plenty of employment opportunities here for you but it is critical to obtain the right to live and work here before applying for a position. At the Australian Immigration website, peruse the various migration paths. Check out the referral list for authorised Migration Agents as these professionals can offer advice to which type of migration is best for you. Although there is a fee involved, you could potentially save valuable time in going though the process.

    Relative to the issue of the resume, over here it is noted as a CV and it is generally more in-depth when it comes to showing how you are qualified to specific tasks. When in the US, I was continually reminded by HR that potential employers wanted three things-cover letter, a single page resume, and references. In Australia, you should prepare a cover letter and prepare a CV of reasonable length (3-5 pages... NOT a phone directory thick document). It may be worthwhile to search the web for sample CV's which will give you an idea of what they look like.

    Best wishes for a bright future!
    As an oversees planner did you find the transition between the two systems difficult? Did you find that coming from a different planning system it was hard to find work initially?

    Thanks

  5. #5
         
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    City of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    20

    Working across the varied planning systems

    The regulations are different but the planning theory forms the basis for all good decisions.

    To be successful, I think it helps to work in a supportive environment with other planners who you can rely on for guidance. I've been very fortunate in this aspect.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Syndey, Australia
    Posts
    130
    Sisikyou is right.

    AUSTRALIAN IMMIGRATION SUCKS

    The officers rarely speak English themselves and currently the occupation of Urban Planner is not on the occupation in demand, but on the list of Critical skills. Go figure.

    PIA has been trying to get urban planner on the list for a while, but doesnt have the resources. It might take another 2 years.

    Best options: If you wanna live in the middle of nowhere for no money you could get a regional planner job. The pay is 50-60k Aussie (hope u dont pay student loans in US dollars like I do) You would also more than likely need to take out private medical insurance at the tune of about $115 a month and still pay for doctors visits with little reimbursement. I do not know if you been to Oz before, but you will either love or hate the Regional lifestyle, depends on the person.

    176 Visa: Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia all feature Urban Planner on their migration charts. Get in contact with them. A permanent visa costs 2,000k just for the application. As a recent grad you might wanna assess your situation. Permanent is the way 2 go. Trust me you dont want to work on a 457 visa.

    My advice: If you are between the ages of 18-30 get the 462 working holiday visa. You can then travel, work and explore planning jobs all at the same time. You might not like Australia, so why take a job? This only takes 2 days to get online. You can only work for an employer for 6 months. This would be good for a private consultant, which is where I would advise you to go. Local government is good for learning the system, but career is limited as well as salary. You do get a day off every 2 weeks or so, but i have found the cons outweigh the pros in local government. Good luck

    www.immi.gov.au

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