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Thread: How friendly is your City?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    How friendly is your City?

    Conde Nast Traveler has announced their annual 10 friendliest and 10 unfriendliest Cities. LINK

    Detroit is getting better, they went from #4 unfriendliest to #6 unfriendliest!

    The City that I work in is a tourist town so people here tend to be very friendly. The City that I live in is a different animal though. The friendliness here is more about how amazing the City is and actually wants new people to move in. Not just one group, but everyone. They also seem to go out of their way to be polite and respectful.
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

  2. #2
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    The city I live in is quite friendly, with a population of around 50,000 and a large university.

    I still consider Austin friendly, but certainly not like it used to be. I used to never hear a car horn. But overall it is friendly--it is normal for the grocery checker to ask you what you're up to that evening or if you have anything cool planned for the next weekend... and then tell you where his/her band will be playing. It is losing that friendly culture though as folks move from far-flung places.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

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    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    I've spent the majority of my life near Detroit and never thought of the area as unfriendly. We even had an employee who moved from Grand Rapids to the Detroit area to work here and he claimed he found this side of the state much friendlier than Grand Rapids, where he grew up.

    After having spent about 4 years living in North Carolina, I found a lot of the talk of "Southern Hospitality" to be just that - talk.

    I've only been to NYC a few times and always thought that NYC (and western Long Island) were much friendlier than how it is generally described.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

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    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Hey I live in Iowa



    sound may be NWS...so turn it down a bit
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    My city and area are very friendly. We tend to be polite, too. Get 3 or 4 cars at a 4-way stop sign and you might have a traffic jam since nobody wants to be "pushy" and go first. People will always stop to chat, to help out, etc.

    I find the City of Buffalo to be very friendly for a large urban metro, especially the "dog people" at Delaware Park or the city's dog park. I've found Amherst and Tonawanda to be very friendly, although there's so much traffic in many parts, it's hard to see. Some of its other suburbs, not so much, however.

    I think that Albany and its environs are much less friendly than western NY.

    Quote Originally posted by WSU MUP Student View post
    I've spent the majority of my life near Detroit and never thought of the area as unfriendly. We even had an employee who moved from Grand Rapids to the Detroit area to work here and he claimed he found this side of the state much friendlier than Grand Rapids, where he grew up.

    After having spent about 4 years living in North Carolina, I found a lot of the talk of "Southern Hospitality" to be just that - talk.

    I've only been to NYC a few times and always thought that NYC (and western Long Island) were much friendlier than how it is generally described.
    I'll second NYC's friendliness, especially the people who actually live in the city. I'm convinced that it's the travelers, transplants, and especially college students from the pricier suburbs who think that they're superior to the rest of the world.
    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. -- John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Doohickie's avatar
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    In my recently completed road trip vacation, the friendliest city was Chattanooga, TN.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by WSU MUP Student View post
    I've spent the majority of my life near Detroit and never thought of the area as unfriendly. We even had an employee who moved from Grand Rapids to the Detroit area to work here and he claimed he found this side of the state much friendlier than Grand Rapids, where he grew up.

    After having spent about 4 years living in North Carolina, I found a lot of the talk of "Southern Hospitality" to be just that - talk.

    I've only been to NYC a few times and always thought that NYC (and western Long Island) were much friendlier than how it is generally described.
    After spending 10 years of my life living in the Grand Rapids area, and the other 26 in Metro Detroit, I concur that the people of Metro Detroit are much friendlier. It's actually one of the first things I noticed when I moved back three years ago.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    After spending 10 years of my life living in the Grand Rapids area, and the other 26 in Metro Detroit, I concur that the people of Metro Detroit are much friendlier. It's actually one of the first things I noticed when I moved back three years ago.
    Really? Wow, that would make GR one of the most unfriendly Cities in the country, and yet I find it to be very friendly.
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Shoot, 25 years ago people used to proudly wear their "Detroit: murder capital of the world" t-shirts all over the place. Is it possible they're losing their street cred a bit these days?

    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Plus dvdneal's avatar
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    I find my town is generally friendly, but they never fully accept transplants. The family just doesn't have the history required to be "part" of the community.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    Vancouver is very unfriendly. Nobody knows their neighbours or wants to.. and everyone has road rage.

    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Really? Wow, that would make GR one of the most unfriendly Cities in the country, and yet I find it to be very friendly.
    All of the American cities I have visited have been significantly friendlier than anything I'm used to.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally posted by Vancity View post
    Vancouver is very unfriendly. Nobody knows their neighbours or wants to.. and everyone has road rage.



    All of the American cities I have visited have been significantly friendlier than anything I'm used to.
    So Canadians are polite, just not friendly. Sounds very British to me.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner View post
    So Canadians are polite, just not friendly. Sounds very British to me.
    I never made that connection. I've always wondered why American cities seem so much friendlier than ours... despite our reputation.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    I was just in Telluride, CO last year and can definitely attest that it is a very laid-back and very friendly town. Although it is interesting that it is on here when it is such a small town. I'm sure there are other small towns out there that are just as friendly.

    The Chicago area is pretty friendly. There's just that Midwestern vibe that shines through. People holding doors for each other, stopping for pedestrians, that sort of thing. And certainly, I'd say certain neighborhoods and suburbs and exurbs are friendlier than others. For instance, you go to a far-flung exurb like Maple Park and everyone knows everyone and walks everywhere in town. In Elburn, the whole town comes out to drink on the streets and socialize while watching a parade. Meanwhile, you go up to a similarly sized place like Deer Park or North Barrington, and while some people are friendly, it's also pretty insular as people hide behind their Land Rovers and gated communities. The same holds true with larger places. Go to Waukegan or Gary and things are a little rough-and-tumble, but go to downtown Naperville or downtown Arlington Heights, and people tend to be friendlier and more social and outgoing.

    That being said though, I'm always blown away when I go to other places in the Midwest, such as parts of downstate Illinois, central Indiana, Wisconsin, and southwest Ohio, and people are even friendlier it seems.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
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    Cyburbian Doohickie's avatar
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    My current home, Fort Worth, is the 6th Friendliest City in the US, according to Condé Nast. The city I lived in previously, Detroit, was the 6th Unfriendliest.

    Frankly I'm surprised both cities were as close to the extremes as they were. I like Fort Worth a lot, but didn't realize others would see it as such a friendly city.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally posted by Vancity View post
    I never made that connection. I've always wondered why American cities seem so much friendlier than ours... despite our reputation.
    Yeah, there is a difference between the two. Polite can come across as stiff and formal. Friendly is like a big, sloppy dog that welcomes you. He may slobber all over you, but he likes you and wants you to know it.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner View post
    So Canadians are polite, just not friendly. Sounds very British to me.
    I wonder if there is a difference in how friendly or unfriendly French-Canadian cities are vs English speaking Canadian cities. There is a stereotype of the French being unfriendly, but all the French Canadians that I have meet seem very friendly. Granted, they were all skiing at the time.
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

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