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Thread: The NEVERENDING Kinda' Dumb Question Thread

  1. #26
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Is what happened at Elysian Fields important history or just fun trivia ?
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  2. #27
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    You guys are asking those same silly hypothetical questions. Until I recently, I would have used this thread to ask "What is lemon zest and how do you get it?" You see it in recipes, but they never explain it!
    lemon zest is basically the rind of the lemon but not the deep pithy part. you use a special tool called a zester to zest a lemon, or orange, or lime. you can also use a vegetable peeler but you have to be careful not to get too much of the pithy part. and with a peeler you end up with long curls of zest, with a zester you end up with several smaller pieces. voila, a zester:



    my question:

    why do humans have fingernails? what purpose do they serve? are they leftover claws from when we evolved?
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  3. #28
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    You guys are asking those same silly hypothetical questions. Until I recently, I would have used this thread to ask "What is lemon zest and how do you get it?" You see it in recipes, but they never explain it!

    OK, here's my not smart ass hypo question: does anyone know a chart, list, whatever, of meat cuts, because cookbooks use different terms for cuts, and I go in looking for one cut of meat and can't find it but it's probably got a different name here than in the area where the cookbook author lived. A couple weeks ago, RJ and I were looking for a piece of pork which was called something different in a cookbook but was a "half picnic" here. I need a master list, with all the regional variations.
    This link has a lot. The Better Homes & Garden Cookbook has a great cut of meat section as well. http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/meatcharts.html
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  4. #29
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    GRAYmalkin

    How come Shakespeare wrote that the witch in Macbeth took on the form of a gray cat, rather than a black cat?
    Grimal’kin or Graymalkin (French, gris malkin).

    Shakespeare makes the Witch in Macbeth say, “I come, Graymalkin,” Malkin being the name of a foul fiend. The cat, supposed to be a witch and the companion of witches, is called by the same name.
    http://www.bartleby.com/81/7657.html

  5. #30
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    Reply to Ottopop

    Why is the meat of some animals given a different name than the animal, while other animals and its meat have the same names?
    When the French invaded England in 1066 they became the new aristocrats, while the anglo-saxon natives remained serfs and peasnts.

    Therefore the names of living domestic animals reflect the language of their anglo-saxon caretakers, while the names of the food reflect the French of the artistocratic diners. Check it out - virtually all the English names of meats on the table are French in origin. And in French the name of the meat is the same as the living animal. (Beuof is cow, veal is calf, pork is pig etc.) Elk was never a domesticated animal in England - but it was an object of the aristocratic hunt.

    Incidentally, in Europe the elk is a moose, derived from the same linguistic source as the Scandinavian "älg". The north American Elk is an entirely different beast.

    But my own questions:
    If 7-11 is open all day everyday, why call it 7-11, and why have locks on the doors?
    If nothing stick to teflon how did they get teflon to stick to the pan?

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally posted by Monamogolo View post
    If 7-11 is open all day everyday, why call it 7-11,
    Because
    1946 7-Eleven® store name introduced because the stores are open 7 a.m. until 11 p.m.
    1963 First 24-hour operation introduced (Austin, TX and Las Vegas, NV)
    http://www.7-eleven.com/AboutUs/Mile...6/Default.aspx
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  7. #32
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Monamogolo View post
    If nothing stick to teflon how did they get teflon to stick to the pan?
    http://www.discovery.com/area/skinny...6/skinny1.html
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  8. #33
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    why do humans have fingernails? what purpose do they serve? are they leftover claws from when we evolved?
    Nails have evolved to protect the sensitive nerve-filled touch pads on the bottoms of our fingers and toes to allow us to handle things with greater dexterity.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  9. #34
    Quote Originally posted by nrschmid View post
    Good thread Dan. It's high time people start discussing the real issues that matter most, like:

    1. Why are buffalo wings made from chicken?
    Well Duhh, because Buffalo's don't have wings

    If you are acting in a Shakespeare play do you have to use an English accent?

    And. Is the English accent used today for those play accurate to the accent of his time?
    Last edited by Gedunker; 27 Jun 2008 at 3:50 PM. Reason: seq. replies

  10. #35
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by steel View post
    Well Duhh, because Buffalo's don't have wings
    Actually, I'm fairly certain the name comes from the City of Buffalo, NY. From Wiki:

    There are four different legends about how the Buffalo wings came to be. [


    * One story is that Buffalo wings were first prepared at the Anchor Bar, located at 1047 Main Street (between North Street and Best Street) in Buffalo, New York, USA on October 3, 1964, by Teressa Bellissimo, co-owner of the Anchor Bar with her husband Frank. Upon the unannounced, late-night arrival of their son, Dominic (and several of his friends from college), Teressa needed a fast and easy snack to present to her hungry guests. It was then that she came up with the idea of deep frying chicken wings (normally thrown away or reserved for stock) and tossing them in cayenne hot sauce.

    * A second version as told by Dominic Bellisimo (Frank and Teressa's son) to "The New Yorker" reporter Calvin Trillin in 1980 stated: "It was Friday night in the bar and since people were buying a lot of drinks he wanted to do something nice for them at midnight when the mostly Catholic patrons would be able to eat meat again." He stated that it was his mother, Teressa, who came up with the idea of chicken wings.

    * The third version of the origin involved a mis-delivery of wings instead of backs and necks for making the bar's spaghetti sauce. Faced with this unexpected resource, Frank Bellisimo says he asked Teressa to do something with them.

    * The fourth version has nothing to do with the Bellisimos or the Anchor Bar. Calvin Trillin stated in his 1980 "New Yorker" article that a man named John Young also claimed credit for serving chicken wings in a special "mambo sauce." Chicken wings in mambo sauce became the specialty at his Buffalo restaurant in the mid-sixties. Young had registered the name of his restaurant, John Young's Wings 'n Things, at the county courthouse before leaving Buffalo in 1970.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  11. #36
    Quote Originally posted by steel View post
    If you are acting in a Shakespeare play do you have to use an English accent?

    And. Is the English accent used today for those play accurate to the accent of his time?
    1) If you're, then ok. If you're not and can't do a believable Standard English or regional accent, I shouldn't bother (it'll only make us complain - and you all know how much we British enjoy that).

    2) Highly unlikely, considering how much accents have changed over the last century or so. (Although a lot of that change has been brought on my the ease of telecommunications and is about becoming more similar, losing a lot of variety. Certain accents have died out altogether, losing ut to the more widespread. At the moment, the most common seems to be the Estuary English / "mockney" accent taking over the more urban areas of England.)
    Glorious Technicolor, Breath-Taking CinemaScope and Stereophonic Sound!

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Is the term Canuck offensive to Canadians?

  13. #38
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop View post
    Is the term Canuck offensive to Canadians?
    It is when non-Canadians use it.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  14. #39
    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop View post
    Is the term Canuck offensive to Canadians?
    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    It is when non-Canadians use it.
    No, and no...at least not to me.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
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    If they are open 24 hours a day, why are there locks on the front door?
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  16. #41
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Does the metric system do fractions like the Emperial system? I don't know why, I would jsut assume it's all decimals.
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  17. #42
    Quote Originally posted by Habanero View post
    Does the metric system do fractions like the Emperial system? I don't know why, I would jsut assume it's all decimals.
    .1 = 1/10...


    What would happen if you made wine out of Green seedless "eating grapes"?

    What if you entered a tasting contest with a wine made from green seedless grapes on the sly won an award. How would the wine "experts" explain this?

  18. #43
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Budgie View post
    If they are open 24 hours a day, why are there locks on the front door?
    The other day I saw a show on dumb criminals. One such Einstein robbed a convenience store and a cop happened to be there. After the cop had the guy disarmed and on the floor, he locked the door (I assume in case the lunkhead had a partner waiting outside.) Might be why 7-11s have locks - just in case of emergencies. Robberies, riots, the night clerk has to respond to the call of nature, etc.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  19. #44
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    Another question for Canadians:

    How do you feel about Michael Moore's citing the Hook A Canuck web site in the ending credits of his movie Sicko, for "Any American interested in marrying a Canadian for health care"?

  20. #45
    Cyburbian tsc's avatar
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    Why aren't all Greyhounds grey?
    "Yeehaw!" is not a foreign policy

    Renovating the '62 Metzendorf
    http://metzendorf.blogspot.com/

  21. #46
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by CJC View post
    Britain only officially switched to the metric system in the late 60's, and still have not entirely switched all distance signs on roads and such. I'm sure centimeters were not in common usage when the song was written
    And the British are having some NASTY problems with lorry drivers from the 'continent' driving into low bridges because the UK posts their clearances in quotes and apostrophies, something that non-UK drivers have no concept of. In fact, some British police agencies are now (mildly) 'suggesting' that the local transport guys start posting them in meters.

    Also, yes, British speed limits are posted in miles, using the exact same sign design as used for the 'km/h' limits everywhere else in Europe.

    Ireland 'metricated' its road signage within the past couple of years, too, and the USofA is the *ONLY* country left on the planet (aside from a couple of tiny islands here and there) that does not price retail fuel in liters.

    Mike

    Quote Originally posted by tsc View post
    Why aren't all Greyhounds grey?
    Having once worked at a racetrack, I can safely say that it is because as dogs of that breed age, their faces turn gray.

    Mike

    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    As a one-time coin collector, the answer is yes. The United States is one of the most conservative countries on the planet with it comes to its currency and coinage;. Currency and coin size and design is seldom changes, because it's intended to be a reflection of the stability of the US dollar. Also, the US public is also VERY conservative when it comes to currency and coinage changes of any sort; witness the outrage in response to the new Jefferson profile nickels. The obverse of the penny has been unchanged for 99 years; from what I understand, it's the oldest continuously used design of any coin currently being minted anywhere in the world.
    Swiss Franc coins have been unchanged for longer. It is not unusual to see current-design coins from the 19th century in daily use there.

    The nickel design thing was because changing their designs would have bruised the political egos of some Congresscritters from Virginia (TJ from from that state). The USA badly needs to de-politicize its coins and banknotes.

    I do agree, though, it is time for a major change in the USA's change to reflect changes in the buying power of coins and banknotes brought upon us by the misguided monetary policies on the past century - the quarter of today is the 'penny' of 100 years ago. I would redo the nickel to reduce its size/weight, drop the 1¢, replace the $1, $2 and $5 notes with coins and introduce a $200 note and reintroduce a $500 note.

    Mike

    (oh yea, you can merge this one in, too)
    Moderator note:
    Dood, you're making me WORK for a living! For future reference, if you want to respond to another post after you posted the last one, just edit your last post including the additional response rather than creating a new post. M'kay? - Maister
    Last edited by Maister; 18 Jul 2008 at 10:46 AM. Reason: consecutive posts

  22. #47
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    ^I can understand getting rid of the penny, but with sales tax added onto the price of most items in most states, we'd still be rounding up or rounding down. I would think there might be some resistance to this. Better yet we could include the tax in the purchase price like they do in Europe. The current system is a bit of an inconvienence. However, I'd think their might be some resistance to this from retailers as prices would seem higher even though the way tax is added on is just reconfigured.

    As to printing bills in denominations higher than $100 I don't really see a demand for it. The $100 bill is barely used as it is, and often frowned upon when one attempts to use it. Even larger bills would not have much of a demand in my opinion.

    As for dollar coins, I know were one of the few countries still with coins in such low denominations, but personally I find paper bills much easier to use seeing as though they fit nice and flat in a wallet. Sure you can buy wallets with a coin pocket, but then they aren't too comfortable to walk around with. Maybe this is where the European carry-all comes in (Seinfeld reference).

    Mods, perhaps this could be split into its own topic?

  23. #48
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jsk1983 View post
    ^I can understand getting rid of the penny, but with sales tax added onto the price of most items in most states, we'd still be rounding up or rounding down. I would think there might be some resistance to this. Better yet we could include the tax in the purchase price like they do in Europe. The current system is a bit of an inconvienence. However, I'd think their might be some resistance to this from retailers as prices would seem higher even though the way tax is added on is just reconfigured.

    As to printing bills in denominations higher than $100 I don't really see a demand for it. The $100 bill is barely used as it is, and often frowned upon when one attempts to use it. Even larger bills would not have much of a demand in my opinion.

    As for dollar coins, I know were one of the few countries still with coins in such low denominations, but personally I find paper bills much easier to use seeing as though they fit nice and flat in a wallet. Sure you can buy wallets with a coin pocket, but then they aren't too comfortable to walk around with. Maybe this is where the European carry-all comes in (Seinfeld reference).

    Mods, perhaps this could be split into its own topic?
    Prior to the 1960s, even when the CPI was less than 1/20th of what it is now, as it was prior to WWII, the USA had commonly circulating coins up to 50¢ with banknotes starting at $1. Before 1933, the USA had commonly circulating coins up to *TWENTY DOLLARS* (a gold double-eagle had buying power of between $500 and $1000 in today's money). Half dollars were more common in circulation than were quarters. The half dollar of 1940 is roughly equal to or even higher than the $10 note of today and could be used to pay for dinner for the family. Nearly all 'small time' daily commerce was done using coins and to have a couple of banknotes in the wallet was to carry REAL money.

    Compare that to now.



    Mike

  24. #49
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by tsc View post
    Why aren't all Greyhounds grey?
    The name comes from Old English "grig" and "hund." Its not clear what the meaning of "grig" is. It may have meant "grey" but it might also have meant "fair" or "light" maybe reflecting the appearance of the earliest forms of the breed. (this comes from wikipedia...)

    In the Medieval period, English royalty also began breeding the greyhound to have different, more striking coat colorings. But I guess the original name stuck.

    Sorry to geek-out. My father was a veterinary geneticist who, among other things, looked at coat color patterning in dogs and cats and also the history of domesticated animals. Don't even ask me about the reasons behind different tabby patterns in cats. Unless you have a few hours...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  25. #50
    The suburbs are mostly run by Republicans who supposedly stand for small government that stays out of your life. So why do the suburbs seem to have more rules set by government?

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