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Thread: Graduate programs in transportation planning

  1. #1
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    Graduate programs in transportation planning

    I am currently a sophmore at Texas State University working on my Urban Planning degree (non-APA accredited) for graduation in 2010. I know this is really early to start looking at graduate schools but I was wondering what my options are.

    I've always taken an interest in the transportation aspect of planning, especially rail transit. What is everyones opinion on the programs throughout the U.S.?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian planr's avatar
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    Since you've got quite a bit of time left, you should be able to explore quite a bit before you have to make any sort of decisions.

    You might want to start out by scheduling a trip in the fall to TAMU in College Station. The Texas Transportation Institute housed there (http://tti.tamu.edu) is one of the best places in the country for transportation research.

    In addition, most top-level schools that house University Transportation Centers (http://utc.dot.gov/utc_safetea-lu.html) will have some top notch research you can be a part of.

    At some schools, transportation isn't a huge focus within the planning department itself, but rather a combined effort from planning, civil engineering and perhaps another field. I think MIT is a good example of this - http://cee.mit.edu/index.pl?id=15054...tegory&op=show

    Good luck!
    "Try to be in two incredibly successful bands. If not, that's okay." -- Words to live by, courtesy of Dave Grohl

  3. #3
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    I'm entering MIT's Master of Science in Transportation program in September. From what I can tell, it is an in-depth, comprehensive transportation planning program housed in the Civil & Environmental Engineering department. Find more info at http://cee.mit.edu/index.pl?id=15054.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally posted by texman View post
    I am currently a sophmore at Texas State University working on my Urban Planning degree (non-APA accredited) for graduation in 2010. I know this is really early to start looking at graduate schools but I was wondering what my options are.

    I've always taken an interest in the transportation aspect of planning, especially rail transit. What is everyones opinion on the programs throughout the U.S.?

    Thanks.
    Also, please look at the prerequisites that accompany each program. A degree in Transportation Planning often requires calculus, statistics, and physics. It is in your best interest to do these as an undergrad than while you are in Grad school and could be doing an internship instead.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by aspiringplanner View post
    Also, please look at the prerequisites that accompany each program. A degree in Transportation Planning often requires calculus, statistics, and physics. It is in your best interest to do these as an undergrad than while you are in Grad school and could be doing an internship instead.
    Whoa, what school is this that requires Calc and Phyics for a MUP? If you are looking for an Urban Planning masters with a specialty in transportation, I've never heard that advanced mathematics are required. Perhaps traffic engineering, perhaps at MIT, but that seems to be the reasonable limit to me.

    I would, however, highly recommend a stats course, along with a "Methods" course. If you can do those as an undergrad, you have a decent shot of "testing out" of those courses at your graduate school and perhaps saving a few bucks (as well as sanity)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally posted by manzell View post
    Whoa, what school is this that requires Calc and Phyics for a MUP? If you are looking for an Urban Planning masters with a specialty in transportation, I've never heard that advanced mathematics are required. Perhaps traffic engineering, perhaps at MIT, but that seems to be the reasonable limit to me.

    I would, however, highly recommend a stats course, along with a "Methods" course. If you can do those as an undergrad, you have a decent shot of "testing out" of those courses at your graduate school and perhaps saving a few bucks (as well as sanity)
    Well, if it's a joint degree through the Engineering department, they may require prerequisites. Anyways, check just in case.

  7. #7
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    I just graduated from A&M with an emphasis in Transportation Planning and it was great. I was able to take 18 credit hours of transportation courses and it was not terribly math intensive until I took a civil class, but that was optional.

    They just initiated a transportation certificate which gives you a little more to put on your resume. I liked it a lot, so if you are interested in A&M, let me know, I would be happy to answer any questions.

    You should seriously check it out if you are wanted to stay in Texas. Look up Eric Dumbaugh, he is the transportation advisor and he was awesome.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally posted by dschrute View post
    I'm entering MIT's Master of Science in Transportation program in September. From what I can tell, it is an in-depth, comprehensive transportation planning program housed in the Civil & Environmental Engineering department. Find more info at http://cee.mit.edu/index.pl?id=15054.

    Congratulations!!!

    Can, I ask a question, I m too interested in joining MS in Transportation of MIT.

    Planning to give GRE this dec.
    Had given GRE a yr before scored 1360, but decided to continue with my masters in Geoinformatics.

    Right now completed my masters in Geoinformatics and working in Reliance Infrastructure as assitant manager.

    Exp gained: 8mnths as on now

    GPA not so gud

    Wat are my aspects in getting into this course? for next sept

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally posted by ved_theone View post
    Congratulations!!!

    Can, I ask a question, I m too interested in joining MS in Transportation of MIT.

    Planning to give GRE this dec.
    Had given GRE a yr before scored 1360, but decided to continue with my masters in Geoinformatics.

    Right now completed my masters in Geoinformatics and working in Reliance Infrastructure as assitant manager.

    Exp gained: 8mnths as on now

    GPA not so gud

    Wat are my aspects in getting into this course? for next sept

    Guess, anyone would be in position to answer this..............
    or is my educational background is not fair enough

  10. #10
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    A good top ten list for transportation planning programs...

    Is there any place that consistently rates transportation planning programs in the U.S? I attend UW Milwaukee, and have an interest in either grad school in Milwaukee, Madison, the Twin Cities, or Chicago. I was just wondering how these programs stack up against the rest of the country. I want to stay in the midwest but I don't want to go to the worst programs in America to do so. Any sources or references anyone could share?

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