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Thread: The NEVERENDING Pet Thread

  1. #151
    Cyburbian
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    That face just says, "in a few months I'm going to chew your entire house up!" How adorable!


    I just took my dog to the vet a couple of weeks ago. $214 later he is now up to date on all his shots and everything. However, last week, McLovin (yes that is his name) was perched on my lap and I felt a lump about an inch away from his spine. Of course I flipped out for several reasons. My dog's not even a year and half yet. I also have this insane attachment to him because my fiance passed away in July and we decided to get McLovin a few months after we put down our other dog. McLovin's the last link I have to my him. I need to make a vet appointment, but I'm honestly too scared to see what they have to say.

  2. #152
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    Newbie don't panic yet though I can completely understand why you would. I seem to recall when my hounds of hell were pups and got shots they once in a while got lumps under the skin where they had received a shot. I freaked out but they were fine.

    Yes call your vet and ask to bring McLovin (I love that name!) in but don't stress yourself too much yet.

    My condolences on your fiance
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  3. #153
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by newbieplanner View post
    I just took my dog to the vet a couple of weeks ago. $214 later he is now up to date on all his shots and everything. However, last week, McLovin (yes that is his name) was perched on my lap and I felt a lump about an inch away from his spine. Of course I flipped out for several reasons. My dog's not even a year and half yet. I also have this insane attachment to him because my fiance passed away in July and we decided to get McLovin a few months after we put down our other dog. McLovin's the last link I have to my him. I need to make a vet appointment, but I'm honestly too scared to see what they have to say.
    Do it now!
    Our yellow lab just went under the knife 3 weeks ago for a lump on her neck. We has this checked out early and it was found to be a concerous mast-cell tumor. It cost about $500 (she got a dental cleaning too while under) but since we caught it early, the vet said that she should be fine for the remainder of her life.

    Our chocolate lab has a lump on her side, but that was checked out as an oily cyst akin to a giant zit.

    I wouldn't wait though.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  4. #154
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by newbieplanner View post
    I just took my dog to the vet a couple of weeks ago. $214 later he is now up to date on all his shots and everything. However, last week, McLovin (yes that is his name) was perched on my lap and I felt a lump about an inch away from his spine. Of course I flipped out for several reasons. My dog's not even a year and half yet. I also have this insane attachment to him because my fiance passed away in July and we decided to get McLovin a few months after we put down our other dog. McLovin's the last link I have to my him. I need to make a vet appointment, but I'm honestly too scared to see what they have to say.
    For sure get it checked out, but there are a number of possibilities and you shouldn't be too worried at this juncture. A lot of dogs get fatty deposits under the skin that feel tumor-ish but they are benign and require no action (though this more a feature of older dogs). Bruising, bites (including insects, spiders or ticks - my one dog used to get notable bumps that swelled for a few days after removing a tick), and other no-cause-for-alarm issues like granulomas can cause this, too. Take it one step at a time and just go see the vet first. And, like zman said, if it is something to be concerned about, the sooner the better and it could be easily remedied.

    I have two vets in my family, so I've got an inside line on some of this stuff. Unfortunately they don't live near me, so its still full price for care
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  5. #155
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    well i should've saved myself the stress and worry and realized that i can't say no to a puppy. she's becomes a permanent member of the pack on saturday.

    meet little Freya Smizmar Warhol
    OOH, she is adorable! Congratulations!

    Our puppy starts good manners training next week...

  6. #156
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I was awakened this morning by one of the cats hacking up a hairball on the bed. Which always involves part of last night's dinner. I gave her a kick off the bed then realized rational decisions are not made when jarred from a sound sleep. Because she then went under the bed and finished the job.

    In retrospect, it might have been better to let her do it on the bedspread, which I could have easily torn off the bed and washed. Now I will have to move the bed and clean up the carpet.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  7. #157
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Okay ... here's an interesting problem.

    My 10 year old neutered male PWD, Guinness, is normally a sweet, playful, and very social dog. He gets along great with Bailey, my nine year old female PWD. One-on-one with other dogs, he's great. At doggie day care, he's great. At the dog park ... well ... he's got a thing for Labs. Seriously ... it's mostly Labs.

    So, my questions are ..

    1) Why does Guinness get the humpies at the dog park, but not in other situations where he's with other dogs? (FWIW, Bailey is the dominant dog at home.)
    2) Why does he favor Labs over other breeds?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails guinness.jpg  
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  8. #158
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    ^^

    Some men prefer blondes...


    That is a weird situation, Dan. I better keep my two female labs locked up.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  9. #159
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    The other day i did the hardest thing i have done in a while. I gave my dog up to the pound. It was really hard, but i found myself and my family in a sticky siutation. Our dog, marley, we believed was abused as a puppy. My wife and daughter went to the county animal shelter last year on a whim and picked her up as a puppy with little to no research. She was pretty loveable, super hyper and obedient to some regarded. She always had an issue of going outside, and as she got bigger this became a growing problem as we called for her to go outside and for a while so we could get some chores done she would hide in the corner. One day she went to the corner and my wife went to go get her she began to growl, bark and show her teeth and "bit" my wife as she tried to put her outside so she could sweep and vacuum the house. Marley did the same thing to me a week back, but i thought nothing of it and tried to work with her after the fact to reassure her it would be allright, coaxing her with treats, balls, etc. This was the last straw since we have a 3 year (whom the dog loved to death, always wanted to sleep on her bed at night) but it is tough to teach a 3 year old when not to grab a dog by the collar when it doesn't want to go and heaven forbid she bit her I would think it would be my fault. Anyways, i cried when we let her go, and asked my wife if there was something i could have done to prevent this (this is my first dog I ever owned). Anyways. I miss Marley. Everything about her. I also miss having a dog. So we are now doing research on dogs and children. When is it right to get back in the saddle of dog ownership? Am i a bad person for letting our dog go back to the animal shelter?
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

  10. #160
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    Am i a bad person for letting our dog go back to the animal shelter?
    No you are not a bad person. When you can't trust any animal around your child and you know it, you have to take measures. Do not beat yourself up. My parents had to do the same thing many years ago.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  11. #161
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    The other day i did the hardest thing i have done in a while. I gave my dog up to the pound. It was really hard, but i found myself and my family in a sticky siutation. Our dog, marley, we believed was abused as a puppy. My wife and daughter went to the county animal shelter last year on a whim and picked her up as a puppy with little to no research. She was pretty loveable, super hyper and obedient to some regarded. She always had an issue of going outside, and as she got bigger this became a growing problem as we called for her to go outside and for a while so we could get some chores done she would hide in the corner. One day she went to the corner and my wife went to go get her she began to growl, bark and show her teeth and "bit" my wife as she tried to put her outside so she could sweep and vacuum the house. Marley did the same thing to me a week back, but i thought nothing of it and tried to work with her after the fact to reassure her it would be allright, coaxing her with treats, balls, etc. This was the last straw since we have a 3 year (whom the dog loved to death, always wanted to sleep on her bed at night) but it is tough to teach a 3 year old when not to grab a dog by the collar when it doesn't want to go and heaven forbid she bit her I would think it would be my fault. Anyways, i cried when we let her go, and asked my wife if there was something i could have done to prevent this (this is my first dog I ever owned). Anyways. I miss Marley. Everything about her. I also miss having a dog. So we are now doing research on dogs and children. When is it right to get back in the saddle of dog ownership? Am i a bad person for letting our dog go back to the animal shelter?
    That was your first dog, you say? I think everyone is entitled to one mistake as a dog owner. My hat is off to folks who actively support and adopt rescue dogs or from rescue orgs or the pound, but with a 3 year old child in the house and a relatively inexperienced dog owner, I can't help but think a 'family dog' (e.g. lab or golden retreiver, poodle, etc.) from a reputable breeder might not be a better choice in that particular case. Are all rescue dogs abused and/or have 'isssues'? Well, some do and some don't. The advantage of getting a first dog from a breeder is that the breed temperament is well-known in advance. More significant yet, is the importance of proper obedience training (true of any dog), particularly in households with toddlers.

    My advice, research dog breeds and read a couple good dog obedience books first and then get a new dog.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  12. #162
    You did the right thing CPSURaf. I know it's lousy, but you just can't take a chance.

    We had to call Animal Control today to remove a stray Jack Russell Terrier that my nine-year old had fallen in love with. We've got a bunch of cats, including a 19-YO who is on his last legs, and JRTs are no match for cats. My daughter will be in tears and crestfallen, but there was nothing else we could do. Letting him roam isn't fair to the dog, there's a main highway out front and he could easily get hit/killed, and someone might be looking for him.

    I wish people would stop dumping animals and take them to the pound where they at least have a chance.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  13. #163
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    CPSUraf, I'd recommend Cesar Millan's book Be the Pack Leader or just watching his show Dog Whisperer (you can rent it on Netflix).

    After getting Kaslo (Houdini), our second Lab, we were about to return her to the pound after one week. Looking into training.. er, training for me, things have never been better. We have a happier home and a more balanced dog. I feel good for giving her a, now, third chance and I cannot imagine my life without her.

    Now, yes, she does like to climb the fence occassionally, but she is about 95% better than the first week we had her.


    Your new dog will need leadership from you, your wife and your kid. It will make things so much better for all.

    Good luck, keep us posted, and PM me for further details on my way of life.

    Net Result: Smiling Dogs...

    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  14. #164
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    The advantage of getting a first dog from a breeder is that the breed temperament is well-known in advance. More significant yet, is the importance of proper obedience training (true of any dog), particularly in households with toddlers.

    My advice, research dog breeds and read a couple good dog obedience books first and then get a new dog.
    I have to say that I am not a big fan of purebred dogs for health reasons (well, not the dogs per se - its not their fault - just the idea of the breeding). This comes from the son of a veterinary geneticist and brother of a veterinary surgeon (that's me). We had dogs through my entire childhood and none of them were purebreeds as per my father's insistence. Pound dogs are also cheaper...

    Purebreds can have a lot of genetically related health problems, many of which do not make themselves known until later in life. And the life expectancy is actually notably lower than in mixed breeds. Its worth keeping in mind that many purebreds were "crafted" to perform a specific type of work (hunting, herding, rescue, etc.) and if you are not going to use the dog for those purposes, you may start to have some behavior problems. Keeping a German Short-haired Pointer in your third floor walk-up, for example, is not going to go well. That dog needs to run a lot - every day. And, believe it or not, some exhibit a classified anxiety condition called...wait for it...Nervous Pointer.

    Which is not to say all purebreds are bad. Certainly not. And the retriever line (labs, Golden retrievers, Chesapeake Bay and Curly-Coateds, etc.) is generally very family-friendly and lovable.

    My own recommendation, if and when you are ready for another dog, would be to look for a mixed breed that is part one of these. The pound, Animal Humane, rescue groups, etc. are all good places to look. Usually, the people who work for these organizations have a good sense of individual dogs' temperments. I often see ads for dog adoptions that specify that the dog is not well suited for young children. But don't rush it. There is nothing wrong with visiting several times to find a dog that fits well with the household's needs. Its a big commitment and its a potentially long one, so everyone has to be on board with the program.

    But really, Maister's comment about training is the all-important central issue. Even a dog that has experienced trauma can turn it around with good direction (but not all - some really are genetically predisposed to be more aggressive). My favorite (and my dog is not exactly a model citizen, so I'm no training Nazi) are the Monks of New Skete books. They have at least two - training for dogs and training for puppies. They are popular and a google search will get you to the book. They get you to think more like a dog (but not in that way that women dislike).

    I think its fine you took the dog to the pound. It is true that some dogs, for whatever reason, have aggression (or especially fear aggression) to a degree that makes them not good house pets. Maybe living on a big farm, but not with kids. Even dogs understand there is a hierarchy to the pack and that they are below the children. It is sad, though.

    On a related note, we had to put our 14 year old dog to sleep a few weeks ago. Got her ashes back last week. Best. Dog. Ever. It was so sad to let her go, but she had cancer, was anemic and could barely lift her head. Zora Heale Nurston RIP.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  15. #165
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I can relate to the challenges of working with dogs that have been abused. Our daughter was neglected as a puppy (she was the only one to survive) and then initially raised in a house with several cats (which explains her adorable habit of chasing and intimidating my wife's cat). She never got along with other dogs and has problems warming up to people, mostly men. It has taken several years of work to get her to relax and let down her guard. Being calm, soothing her, and showing affection have brought her around. She mostly ignores other dogs now, and she is getting much better with people. We can walk by them and she will just keep going, instead of barking like she once did. She is even good with some visitors, and especially seems to do well with my family. But it has been a long road. Not something to do with a kid around.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  16. #166
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    Ugh, I'm sorry and feel your pain having to make the choice to give your dog up. We thought about taking our Oreo back to the pound after a few months as he was obviously abused and has more issues than fit in the over head compartment. He's a smart dog, very healthy and gentle with people, easy to train to do tricks and toy names but once in a while he just looses it and goes nuts. There are triggers I have found over the years and we work with them but hes not an easy dog to deal with and can never be in a home with kids, cats or lots of commotion. My home is very laid back and I can't have kids so I kept him promising to give him the best life I could.

    Over the years we have worked some of his problems out, no more fear puddles, loud sounds don't scare him to death anymore but god do not try to put him in a crate or get ANYWHERE near his food or he goes apeshit.

    I lost my rottie girl Kia to cancer two years ago this month, damn smart dog I miss every single day.
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  17. #167
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    The devil-worshipping place I go to on Sundays


  18. #168
    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker View post
    We had to call Animal Control today to remove a stray Jack Russell Terrier that my nine-year old had fallen in love with. ~snip~
    Turns out he has a bio-chip.
    But the owners are in Georgia and no longer registered.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  19. #169
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    AIB - Texan Okie's brush with a snake

    My mom had three boys. As children we had all sorts of pets many moms would find yucky. My big brother had a lot of reptiles - turtles, mostly, but also iguanas, desert lizards, snakes, etc. He became a herpetologist.

    We had caimans too. One day one of our cats caught one and injured it pretty bad. My mom calls the vet. "What can I do about an alligator that was bitten by a cat?"

    "You mean a cat who was bitten by an alligator?" the vet responded.

    "No. My son's pet alligator was attacked by the cat."

    The vet was no expert on reptiles. He offered this advice: the biggest danger was the animal would go into shock. So she should sedate him until it recovers from it initial injury.

    "How do I do that? asks my mom. She was always ready for a challenge.

    "Give him a little alcohol. USe an eye dropper."

    My mom fed the gator brandy with an eye dropper. It got drunk and bit her. But it survived. It's back legs were paralyzed but it got along well enough swimming with its tail and front legs.

    That was classic Mom. Five foot two and a hundred pounds, she was pretty much fearless and generally unflappable. She took after a punk, brandishing a shovel, when some punk teenager spit on me. He ran off covering his head, saying "Okay, okay, little momma." The neighborhood kids in need of first aid would often come to her for a fix-up before going back home. She considered motherhood to be not a job but an adventure.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  20. #170
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    All hail the fearless mom!

    My own mother was similarly unphased and tolerant of bizarre, probably less than responsible pet keeping. My brother and I both had snakes. One day while doing some cleaning, my mother noticed that Ozwald, my brother's 5 foot boa, was not in his cage. This happened from time to time, so she did not think much of it.

    So, off she went to fetch the upright vacuum and finish up. She wheeled it down the hall and into the bedroom, bent down to plug it in and, just before she fired it up, noticed that the bag was swaying ever so slightly. Thinking this was a bit odd, she zipped open the bag and Ozwald came gliding out covered in dust. He had crawled up inside the machine just as if he had been sucked up into it and ended up in the bag (actually his tail end was still sticking out of the bottom when she turned it over)

    This was all just before heading out to the doctor's for a check up. All went well except the doctor did notice that her blood pressure seemed a little on the high side. "Any reason that might be?"
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  21. #171
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    I WILL put my foot down if my kids requested reptiles or rodents for pets.

    I'll have mother take them to the zoo if they are so interested.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  22. #172
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    We don't do pets at our house. We like animals, just not living with us. The adventures here are fun to read and the pics are cute.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  23. #173
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    We don't do pets at our house. We like animals, just not living with us. The adventures here are fun to read and the pics are cute.
    You don't need an animal, kjel...

    you've got a teenager!


    >rimshot<

  24. #174
    Cyburbian natski's avatar
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    In line with a couple of the conversations....

    Our very first dog we had to give away to a farm. My dad in his wisdom decided that a doberman would be the perfect breed of dog for our family. It was a beautiful dog, but needed a lot more room and had bad behaviour problems that we could just not fix and my mum was afraid of it. We found a new home for it- makes me sad thinking about that.

    We now have Abbie, a purebread Collie. My mum grew up with one as a child and their temperament suited our family perfectly. They are not easily come by as a breed, so we had to go to a breeder. She interviewed my parents to make sure the family were good candiates and my parents did their research on the breeder, who had a great rep. Its been the best thing for our family, she brings so much joy and life into the house (oh and naughtiness)

    We have reptiles as well in the house- 2 turtles, cute little things they are. But my mother will not touch them!
    "Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?" Zoolander

  25. #175
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Yesterday was Cassidy's first day of "Good Manners" dog training. The class was held right after puppy playtime, though, and she was far too wound up to focus at first. She just wanted to keep playing with the other dogs in the class! Next week we'll try a different schedule.

    On the plus side, Cassidy seems to learn the commands pretty quickly. She understands that clicking = treats, and yummy treats are a great motivator! We'll continue to practice the commands we covered in class over the next week.

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