Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Two-week notice, enough?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    meh.
    Posts
    8,496

    Two-week notice, enough?

    So.....hypothetically speaking, if a subordinate of yours was planning on resigning, how much notice would you want? But let's suppose, work consists of a small office 3 FT, 2 PT. And let's suppose that there are some nasty politics occurring in the office that may result in another person leaving their position and the management is thinking of transitioning that work to the subordinate considering resigning.

    I've always gone by the two-week notice or equivalent to amount of annual vacation time. But in this situation it doesn't seem like enough notice.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  2. #2
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    12,648
    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    So.....hypothetically speaking, if a subordinate of yours was planning on resigning, how much notice would you want? But let's suppose, work consists of a small office 3 FT, 2 PT. And let's suppose that there are some nasty politics occurring in the office that may result in another person leaving their position and the management is thinking of transitioning that work to the subordinate considering resigning.

    I've always gone by the two-week notice or equivalent to amount of annual vacation time. But in this situation it doesn't seem like enough notice.
    If you don't have a policy, I think two weeks is the default. If you feel more is expected I would go with your gut. I think that two weeks is all that is owed to the agency if they don't spell out something different.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  3. #3
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Remote command post at local bar
    Posts
    8,773
    Ditto. I think we might have a policy for department heads to give more time, but if there isn't a policy, 2 weeks is standard. If the person likes the place (doesn't sound like it) give a little more just to be nice. If not 2 weeks and screw them. What are they going to do, tell the next place you only have them 2 weeks?
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  4. #4
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    5,891
    Two weeks is the baseline--it sucks, but they don't have any obligation to respect the situation you are stuck with if they leave.

    That being said... if there's a positive relationship and the person has some flexibility with their future employer, you can always ask if they would be willing to extend their notice by an extra week. They might have no choice but to say no (they need to focus on their future), but you can certainly ask & perhaps even explain why in some vague terms. But be understanding if they can't help you out like that as it is asking a lot.

    You can also see if their new employer will allow some moonlighting under contract for a brief period to assist with the transition, inquiries, etc. Again though, this is not something you can force.

    I have always given 3-4 weeks at my prior positions (usually stated as 2 weeks, but with a statement that I'm able to extend notice if needed up to __ days), simply because I always negotiate my start date at wherever I'm headed to allow it and because I've usually been in a somewhat critical position when departing (upper mgmt or director).

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  5. #5
    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2002
    Location
    On the corner of Walk and Don't Walk
    Posts
    846
    Yeah two weeks is plenty. It sucks for those left behind but the other side of the coin is that you have to ask yourself how productive they are going to be anyway? They've already made a decision to leave and once that happens you're sort of mentally checking out anyway.
    He's a planner, he's a dreamer, he's a sordid little schemer,
    Seems to think that money grows on trees . . .

  6. #6
    Cyburbian RandomPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Missing up north from the low country
    Posts
    953
    I've always felt that two weeks was fair however... I gave 2 months once. It was a small, close knit office and I knew the work load was going to have to change dramatically when I left. I also really liked these people so I wanted to be straightforward and also be able to be excited about going back to school.

    Still, I think two weeks is fair.
    How do I know you are who you think you are?

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    curiosity
    Posts
    20,880
    The value of giving 2 week notice is found in my fair county's personnel handbook -

    Employees who fail to give two (2) weeks notice prior to resignation or who are discharged for cause forfeit any right to receive compensation for unused vacation time.

    Upon separation of employment, an employee will be compensated for unused sick leave on a pro rated basis based upon the date of separation. Employees who fail to give two (2) weeks notice prior to resignation or who are discharged for cause forfeit any right to receive compensation for unused sick leave.

    At the time of retirement or separation of employment, employees with at least three years of continuous service shall be entitled to receive payment, at the current rate of pay, for sick leave accumulated in the employee’s sick leave bank up to a maximum of sixty (60) days. Employees who fail to give two (2) weeks notice prior to resignation or who are discharged for cause forfeit any right to receive compensation for unused time in the sick leave bank.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Salmissra's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    4,625
    The most I've ever given is 3 weeks. And that was because I was moving across state and didn't have another job lined up yet.

    But otherwise, 2 weeks is my standard.

    It sounds like the organization is going to lose some good people all around the same time. Somehow I doubt that they will rethink their political nastiness.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Above urban19's plane field
    Posts
    2,792
    I've always (with one exception**) given two weeks, although if I leave my current firm, I will try to give them as much notice as possible - they have been very good to me, and since their hiring process is one of the slowest I've seen on The Dark Side, I would want to give them as much time as I can to find a replacement.


    **The one exception was with my last firm, who I gave just four days notice...considering that their office head had a fit about me taking time off every other Friday (using vacation leave I had earned) so I could sit with my sister during her chemotherapy sessions, they're damn lucky they got any notice.
    I found you a new motto from a sign hanging on their wall…"Drink coffee: do stupid things faster and with more energy"

  10. #10
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 1998
    Location
    Greensburg, Kansas
    Posts
    3,034
    The man doesn't care. Leave the time that you feel comfortable with (2 weeks minimum). Often they take months to replace you. I have given 2 weeks, usually a month. I have been asked to turn in my keys on the DAY I submitted notice.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
    Registered
    May 2002
    Location
    On the edge of the abyss
    Posts
    1,204
    It depends. I've admittedly grown bitter, but I say that you don't have to give 2 weeks notice unless you care what other think about you. Think about it. Employers certainly don't need to give 2 weeks notice to their employees.

    What do you mean I can't plan? My SimCity has 200,000 people with a 99% happiness rating!

  12. #12
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Remote command post at local bar
    Posts
    8,773
    Quote Originally posted by Coragus View post
    It depends. I've admittedly grown bitter, but I say that you don't have to give 2 weeks notice unless you care what other think about you. Think about it. Employers certainly don't need to give 2 weeks notice to their employees.

    True, but I'll always try to be the classy one. Give 2 weeks, sit on your ass because no one expects you to do anything, and do your best to help the one or two people you like in the organization. That being said, I've never had to give two weeks, I've been laid off from my last three jobs. Called unethical when I gave my two weeks and told everyone I was going to work for the other company, this by a guy who gave his wife the Christmas bonus at one place (I left two days into my notice), and had half my crap stolen when I took a long lunch the day I gave two weeks at one place (they thought I quit already).
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Brocktoon's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Promoting synergies...
    Posts
    3,677
    Two weeks is enough... if you feel that is not enough time to transition or want to give them more time to find a replacement then 3 weeks to a month. When I left my last job I let them know I was offered a position and was going to be resigning in the next few weeks (although they would figure that out when they called my current employer for a reference check) and then I gave a formal two weeks with the offer to make it 3 if they needed it.
    "You merely adopted the dark. I was born in it,..." -Bane

  14. #14
    Cyburbian SoutheastMCRP's avatar
    Registered
    May 2015
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    28
    The longest I've ever given was close to four weeks, because I knew that all of my work would be shunted to my office-mate, who I liked and respected, during the search for my replacement, and it would be a LOT of work. I actually felt like I worked more in my last four weeks than any other time trying to wrap up all of my loose ends and ensure that she was fully trained to take on my responsibilities.

    Every other time though, it's been two weeks standard. I gave extra notice purely as a courtesy to my office-mate, who I wanted to retain good ties with.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    6,861
    Quote Originally posted by Coragus View post
    It depends. I've admittedly grown bitter, but I say that you don't have to give 2 weeks notice unless you care what other think about you. Think about it. Employers certainly don't need to give 2 weeks notice to their employees.

    I've not even grown bitter and jaded yet, but I still agree with this.

    These days most employers (public sector included) treat their employees as commodities and the times of undying loyalty (either way) are gone the way of the defined benefits plan. Yes, two weeks notice is ideal but I don't think there is any moral or ethical obligation to provide it.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  16. #16
    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2002
    Location
    On the corner of Walk and Don't Walk
    Posts
    846
    I actually just checked and my employer requires managers and up to provide 4 weeks notice. I have way too much vacation time that wouldn't be paid out if I didn't do the 4 weeks so I would have to honor that requirement. I wouldn't like it, but I'd do it. But like I said before, I think for the most part once you've made the decision to leave who are you really helping by staying? As an old boss used to say: if you got hit by a bus the work would still be there.
    He's a planner, he's a dreamer, he's a sordid little schemer,
    Seems to think that money grows on trees . . .

  17. #17
    Cyburbian beach_bum's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2007
    Location
    more West now
    Posts
    3,385
    While two weeks is standard, its not possible to wrap things up in planner world in two weeks typically. We just had a planner leave and gave 2 weeks-it didn't even come close to being sufficient, but that's my manager's problem, not mine. In my last job I gave a four week notice unofficially to get things wrapped up and felt really good about how I left things there.
    "Never invest in any idea you can't illustrate with a crayon." ~Peter Lynch

  18. #18
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2011
    Location
    West side
    Posts
    56
    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    While two weeks is standard, its not possible to wrap things up in planner world in two weeks typically. We just had a planner leave and gave 2 weeks-it didn't even come close to being sufficient, but that's my manager's problem, not mine. In my last job I gave a four week notice unofficially to get things wrapped up and felt really good about how I left things there.
    I agree. Within the two weeks, if there's a public holiday or some all-day public outreach event (like an open house), that is even less time to wrap up. I would give 3-4 weeks, if I want to leave on good terms. Anything longer than that would probably be too much.

    Within the 2 or 4 weeks' notice though, are you allowed to take sick leave or vacation leave (thereby reducing the number of days you're actually in the office during your "notice period")? So for those who must give 4, can it be effectively cut down to 2 weeks, if you clear 2 weeks of leave out of that 4?

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Notice to South Division
    Fantasy Football
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 07 Sep 2006, 11:17 AM
  2. Application Notice Lists
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 20
    Last post: 26 Aug 2002, 7:34 PM