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Thread: Are many of us planners weather nuts/buffs?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    Are many of us planners weather nuts/buffs?

    I have always been fascinated by weather in is many changing faces, spending hunks of time in Alabama I got a very healthy respect for tornadoes, living in the tropics rain and dry seasons are amazing and snow well that stuff scared the bejezus out of me.

    My father was a man with salt water in his veins, he taught me all sorts of things about weather and clouds, wind and sailing. A geography degree gave me chances to learn about weather and climate in a more scientific way but all of it just made me more fascinated.

    The other half has developed a healthy curiosity about the weather and climate living with me to the point he peppers me with questions rapid fire as storms brew or ice forms. Sometimes I can answer him, sometimes I cant and sometimes its a bit of good natured story telling.

    Today I saw the NWS is offering Basic SKYWARN classes about 45 min or so from out home on a Saturday afternoon. I have asked the mate if he may want to go (gotta RSVP in advance) but I am not sure this will be at all what interests him or if it will be whacked out geeky guys (sorry geeks) who pretend to be storm chasers (I have very little respect for folks who do this outside of University type studies).

    Are my fellow planners also fascinated by weather and climate?
    Have any of you taken the SKYWARN classes and become spotters?
    Will this overwhelm him and annoy me?
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by PlannerGirl View post
    Are my fellow planners also fascinated by weather and climate?
    Have any of you taken the SKYWARN classes and become spotters?
    Will this overwhelm him and annoy me?
    Yes, by example of my previous postings about weather.
    My fair city/county's Multi Hazard Mitigation Plan and Comp Plan have several pages about tornadoes and flooding that I researched and wrote.

    Yes, I have taken the basic and advanced classes, and even had a NWS radar interp class. I even have a EMA Radio.
    Going even further is FEMA's on-line Independent Study:
    Course Name: Anticipating Hazardous Weather & Community Risk
    Course Code: IS-271
    http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is271.asp

    Shouldn't.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Good thread idea!

    I take a special delight in examining weather radar images and maps. I also enjoy the visceral sense that goes with just standing outside and looking to the skies in a particular direction and trying to get an intuitive feeling of what's going to happen weather-wise. Having lived in West Michigan as long as I have and following meteorology like I have, I can often tell what the local televsion meteorologists are saying with the sound turned completely off. You tend to see the same/similar patterns again and again. It's fun as a predictive 'game' and there are some practical advantages to getting good at reading the skies (particularly when you're camping!)

    Since many of us have degrees in geography I bet a pretty high percentage of folks around here have taken one or more college courses in meteorology.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    I am not, but the Resident Teenager is and has been all of her life. You are playing with the devil if you even dare ask what the weather is going to be like today because you will get an answer about warm or cold fronts, winds, humidity, and whatnot. She has the dream of becoming a meteorologist and has already picked out the universities she wants to apply to. At least it's keeping her motivated in school.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  5. #5
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    I was just remarking to the wife a couple mornings ago how I would someday like to have a mini-weather station at the house.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  6. #6
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    I must be king meteorology geek of planners.

    I make my own forecasts occasionally.
    I have storm chased numerous times.
    I take lightning photographs.
    I studied meteorology for 2.5 yrs in college prior to the switch.
    I've met Tom Skilling (of WGN fame) and hung out with him in his forecast room at the WGN studios for about 4 hours.
    Attended a national storm chasing seminar and met Chuck Doswell and other pioneers of storm research.
    I have a fully functioning weather station in my backyard.(anemometer, barometer, humidity, dew point, rain gauge, thermometer)
    Trained weather spotter

    @suburb Repairman
    we'll need to compare data sets :nerd:
    Last edited by boiker; 03 Oct 2008 at 2:16 PM.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  7. #7
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    I seriously considered meteorology, but wasn't sure about job prospects and was scared to death I'd have to take a bunch of chemistry. My mom used to think something was wrong with me because I was fascinated by the Weather Channel when I was about 6. If I had a choice, I'd be working for the NWS doing severe storms research & forecasting.

    I have one of these at home. THough I'd like to upgrade to a Davis product.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    OK good I'm not alone though no one has answered if the NWS SKYWARN classes are good for the other half and his casual interest.

    Just please tell me I am not the only one who can smell snow, you know that kinda powdery dried ember smell.
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  9. #9
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PlannerGirl View post
    Just please tell me I am not the only one who can smell snow, you know that kinda powdery dried ember smell.
    You're by no means alone. Eskimoes even have at least one word for the phenomenon.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Fat Cat's avatar
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    Fat Cat

    I am because during my career I have also been a DPW Director in the midwest and have subscribed to different informational services for salt ordering, work scheduling, truck setups etc. So it carries over when I get back to being a planner

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Interesting Educational Opportunity

    Weather and Built Environment: Free Online Course
    Date: 9/24/2008 - 12/31/2008
    details at http://www.asla.org/EventDetails.aspx?id=19296

    Weather and the Built Environment is the second in a series of NEEF-COMET courses, including Watersheds: Connecting Weather to the Environment, and the upcoming Weather and the Public's Health (fall 2008) and Climate Change (early 2009). Additional courses of interest can be found on the COMET website.

    Why can't this qualify for CM Hrs ?
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  12. #12
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    While at the university I took a climate and weather class, which I loved. Physical sciences are a big interest of mine.

    The weather day to day is not. Partly it is because it is such a big interest of my wife. Every morning she has to check the weather in the paper. Why is it important to her - because she is South American and we live in Montana.

    It is too cold in the winter and the sun is too strong in the summer. If it rains it is too cold and if it doesn't rain then it is too dry. I am constantly quized on whether I think it is cold or not. Usually I don't and she does. When she married me, we lived in Alaska, for Christ sakes!

    So the almost daily discussions of the weather seem like a criticism of me.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  13. #13
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    Weather Geek

    I was the ultimate weather geek starting in middle school. I kept a "weather journal." I would cut out the weather forecast from the newspaper (yes, before the internet) and past it in my journal. i would then document the current weather conditions from my at home weather station (given to me by my parents for my 12th birthday) that included a themometer, an anemometer and a barometer.

    In high school, I wrote a grant to a local company so our school could obtain a weather station that reported to a local news channel. I headed the data collection for that station.

    I went to college with every intention to become a meteorologist, enrolled in Penn State for meteorology....until...I got up to Calc 3 and could not pass it. I decided to pursue a degree in Geography (my advisor was a geographer). I fell in love.

    I began my professional career as an environmental planner and earned a Masters Degree in Community Development and Planning.

    My love for weather still exists. I enjoy boating and skiing which are totally dependent on the weather.

    Yes, I think planning is linked to being a weather nut!!

  14. #14
    Cyburbian rcgplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    I seriously considered meteorology, but wasn't sure about job prospects and was scared to death I'd have to take a bunch of chemistry. My mom used to think something was wrong with me because I was fascinated by the Weather Channel when I was about 6. If I had a choice, I'd be working for the NWS doing severe storms research & forecasting.

    I have one of these at home. THough I'd like to upgrade to a Davis product.
    Another fellow Weather Channel fan here. I remember getting the same reaction from my parents when I was a kid. When I was younger I really wanted to go to school to become a meteorologist, but the large amounts of math scared me. Part of me would still love to work in that field, but I am too far in debt from my Master's it would never happen. I would love to take a Skywarn Class, but I wonder if it is older people that would more then likely take the class. I think it is something that is worthwhile and if you want to do it PG I think it would be a good experience.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    Definitely and need to watch the Weather Channel every night before bed and waking up in the morning. I have three different weather websites saved as favorites and check them daily as well. Have been like that since jr. high school when I experienced my first hurricane. Wasn't a very good student though, I got a D in a Weather class in college (although it might have been because it was an 8:00 am class - thats my story and I'm stickin to it).


    24 hour forecast: long period of darkness, followed by abundant bright.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  16. #16
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by Planit View post
    24 hour forecast: long period of darkness, followed by abundant bright.
    If you were trying to qoute George Carlin's Al Sheet Hippy Dippy Weatherman, it is -

    "Weather forecast for tonight: Dark, continued dark overnight, with widely scattered light by morning."
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  17. #17
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by otterpop View post
    So the almost daily discussions of the weather seem like a criticism of me.
    Sounds like the gov'ment ought to do something to fix these rapid and upredictable changes in the weather market. I bet $500B outta do the trick.

    I would love to take a Skywarn Class, but I wonder if it is older people that would more then likely take the class.
    At my class it was a mix of older folks, HAM radio guys, and myself. It was rather easy to identifiy who was who and who was elderly and HAM. The class covers a basic knowledge on how to identify significant weather and how to report it. It does not, IMO, give you a lot of examples of how to determine which storms will become severe or have a chance to produce significant weather. But that is not the point of spotting. Spotters are intended to provide real-time reporting of weather conditions and just report what they see, not what they expect.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian vagaplanner's avatar
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    I do watch the weather channel quite a bit, but I think its mostly map related.
    ...my lifestyle determines my death style!
    - Metallica

  19. #19
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hmmm....

    Not really....I used to have one of those cool cloud charts, so I would know what to call them as I pointed to the sky I love bad weather of all kinds
    Skilled Adoxographer

  20. #20
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    I think everybody in Florida is a meteorologist, especially during hurricane season. I check the National Hurricane Center several times a day during the breezy season.

    How long until the last day of November?
    I think that one of the great signs of security is the ability to just walk away.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian sisterceleste's avatar
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    Zoning Goddess is a hurricane nut. You would be to if a pine tree went thru your utility room.
    You darn tootin', I like fig newtons!

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by sisterceleste View post
    Zoning Goddess is a hurricane nut. You would be to if a pine tree went thru your utility room.
    ...and my carport.

    Well, I can say I follow the weather very closely, although I've never been that interested in the science behind it. I do watch very closely (well, almost obsessively) all the t.v. and internet news about any 'cane that could possibly come my way. And I love thunderstorms, as long as I'm not stuck outside.

    I acquired my first weather alert radio after a series of tornadoes in central FL killed 42 people eleven years ago. It drives RJ and the kid nuts when it goes off in the middle of the night, but I don't want to give it up.

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    This Bear is a real fan of weather......watching it, predicting it, enjoying it.....Weather Channel is one of the first stations I turn to.....

    That said.....

    The continental climate in the Great Lakes area brings a lot of challenges. This is a good place to live the adage, "If you don't like the weather, stick around.....it will change in a few minutes."

    The Weather Channel came on the air in 1982. At that time I was already approaching 20 years out of high school. The weather forecasts that stay in my old brain are courtesy of Detroit's WJR-AM radio. All through the 60s, the 70s, and into the 80s, the knowledgable weather folks at that powerful station taught me plenty about weather in lower Michigan and northern Ohio. One of the regulars was also a sailboat skipper, so his knowledge was especially accurate.....and educational.

    When the Weather Channel debuted I was an instant fan.....and have been since. Being a bit of a geography geek is also helpful.....a natural fit.

    And I am not a planner! (Or, at the least, I don't get paid to "plan".)

    BTW.....tonight's temperature in NW Ohio, as the rain clouds move away.....expected to be in the middle 30F range.....a bit below normal.



    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  24. #24
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North View post
    BTW.....tonight's temperature in NW Ohio, as the rain clouds move away.....expected to be in the middle 30F range.....a bit below normal.
    Way too cold for weather nuts or weather in the buff. BUN, you really need to catch the snowbird special this time of year. Won't be long before you have to bring the brass monkeys in at night.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  25. #25
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    Way too cold for weather nuts or weather in the buff. BUN, you really need to catch the snowbird special this time of year. Won't be long before you have to bring the brass monkeys in at night.
    ofos.....Quite frankly, the "brass monkeys" have receeded since about 1987.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

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