Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: TransCAD

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    19

    TransCAD

    I'm doing some research for the company I work for, which is considering purchasing TransCAD.

    I'd like to know, specifically, what the learning curve for the program is like compared to a traditional GIS like Arcview 9.x.

    Also, what kind of man-hours (ballpark) are we talking about when setting up a network in TransCAD for a corridor study?

    Thanks,

    Tom

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2005
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    608
    HAHAhAhAhA ha....

    I tell by your questions that you do not have a clue. A GIS and a TDM (trans demand model) are completly different. While TransCAD does perform GIS functions, that is not its purpose for existance. Look up model calibration, Trip generation, mode shift....just reasearch setting up a TDM...try the TRB site.

    Creating a TDM can be a costly venture.....reasearch well.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    19

    Inappropriate

    "Flying Monkeys",

    Your response was immature and unprofessional.

    You also seem to have misinterpreted at least part of my question. Of course TransCAD is not used for the same purposes as a traditional GIS. If it were, there would be no reason to purchase it assuming one already had ArcView 9.x or an equivalent. I was wondering about the learning curve for the software.

    You are correct in stating that I have a lot to learn a about TDM. However, in the future please keep any snarky comments off of the forums.

    If you feel the need to correct someone or point out shortcomings at least have the class to do so via a personal message or email.

    -Tom
    Last edited by tharne; 03 Oct 2008 at 1:45 PM. Reason: typo

  4. #4
    Cyburbian transguy's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Midwest-ish
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally posted by tharne View post
    I'm doing some research for the company I work for, which is considering purchasing TransCAD.

    I'd like to know, specifically, what the learning curve for the program is like compared to a traditional GIS like Arcview 9.x.

    Also, what kind of man-hours (ballpark) are we talking about when setting up a network in TransCAD for a corridor study?
    There are a lot of variables that such a short post makes difficult to get reasonable answers for. I'm not all that familiar with CT, and don't know what type of modeling program most planning agencies use around there. I would start by contacting you local MPO and trying to figure out what they use as there may likely be some benefit to using a consistent program. In my neck of the woods, the local MPO has been know to give copies of their model out for people to use for their studies. This would help to GREATLY reduce your costs as you should already have a calibrated base model to work off.
    Much work remains to be done before we can announce our total failure to make any progress.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,100
    Both FM and TG have given some pretty good advice. I think the point FM was trying to make was that keeping a model is a continuous process. I'm not a modeler but from my expeirecne and understanding, all ArcINFO does is make the output look better. We have worked on our model since the 1960's continously updating it. I would have no idea how long it would take to start from scratch.

    I've been on staff here for about 18 years and over that time we have always had several people working on the model at any given time. It is a very data intensive exercise. I can't see a day when the model will be considered 'done'. Each census will bring in changes, as modal splits become better defined those bring in changes too. Adding a road, access point or traffic generator will change things as well.

    Depending upon where you are and what its porpose is, the MPO or your State DOT would be the primary places to start this process. It may serve you well to work out some sort of agreement with the agency or contract them to do the model runs for you.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2005
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    608
    Quote Originally posted by tharne View post
    "Flying Monkeys",

    Your response was immature and unprofessional.

    -Tom
    Whatever....It is not me that needs to post to a board to try to get someone else to do my job for me. You are out of your depth little fish...you and the enity you work for should talk to a consultant about what effort and cost this would be. We get paid to provide you with answers.

    You do your employer an injustice when you assume you can gain years of knowledge from surfing the net and posting to a board... this is serious money, find someone who makes a living doing this and PAY them to guide you.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Vermont, USA
    Posts
    5

    TransCad - whole other ball game

    Hello There - While I am not a personal Trans Cad user I work with many that do. By meaning many, I mean very few relative to the many other transportation engineers/planners.

    the skills required to do Trans CAD are immense and very difficult to come by. Often the people with these skills are very highly trained in stats, transportation demand equations (logit models, etc.) and require very high salaries vs. public dollars often supporting their work.

    Without getting more specific, you should learn more about the function of what you may use it for, understand your clients, and be aware that the learning curve is long and flat.

    Good luck! hope that helps

  8. #8
    BANNED
    Registered
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Newton, MA
    Posts
    1
    The learning curve is generally considered to be lower and it is relatively easy to learn TransCAD especially if you have some experience with any GIS system. Also, developing a network is much easier than developing a model.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Does anybody here have TRANSCAD?
    Information Technology
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 22 Jun 2008, 1:14 PM