Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Portland versus Twin Cities

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Illinois as of 1/1/09
    Posts
    221

    Portland versus Twin Cities

    I know everyone puts Portland on a pedestal - but if you look, the population density of both Saint Paul and Minneapolis is far higher than Portland.

    Perhaps they have done something even better than Portland?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    2,904
    Population density is not necessarily the best measure to judge urban planning implementation success.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Richi's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    409
    When it gets as cold as it does in the Twin Cities You have to huddle together.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,839
    So what? Mexico City,Delhi, Karachi, etc. have even higher densities than that, and I would never want to live there. You can't and SHOULDN'T base everything about a city on it's density. If you HAVE to use a standard of measurement, I would recommend comparing the quality of life that each place affords. Even then, I am still skeptical about placing all cities on one playing field, no pun intended.

  5. #5
    Dan Staley's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Front Range, CO
    Posts
    294
    Quote Originally posted by paiste13 View post
    I know everyone puts Portland on a pedestal - but if you look, the population density of both Saint Paul and Minneapolis is far higher than Portland.

    Perhaps they have done something even better than Portland?
    These are value judgments.

    There is no one indicator that captures the complexity of a city. Generally, good microecon/urbecon papers attempt to reach a conclusion about something with at least a half-dozen factors, minimum. I agree with nrschmid that one should look to QOL indicators, and in addition one should look at equity wrt societal analysis, and don't forget the ecosystem and economic indicators before one makes 'better' comparisons.

    HTH.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Illinois as of 1/1/09
    Posts
    221
    needless to say, both Portland and the Twin Cities are in the top 5 or 10 for just about EVERY QOL measurement there is.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Plan-it's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2005
    Location
    In the Peach State
    Posts
    921
    The twin cities are highlighted for a much different reason in comparison to Portland. Minniapolis/St. Paul have regional tax base sharing which reduces competition for scarce commercial tax base resulting in little inter-jurisdictional competition for these resources. This means that decisions can be based on sound urban form and rational decision making (theoretically).
    Satellite City Enabler

  8. #8
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    Surf Jock City
    Posts
    197
    Both cities have reputations for urban innovation, the 'pedestal' you're talking about. Minneapolis certainly got points for being one of if not the first to revitalize their riverfront warehouse neighborhood and utilize dead railroad tracks, and Portland of course gets the spotlight for its smart growth boundary etc. Part of the pedestal mentality comes from image, though - Portland happens to be a liberal, 'nice' city while another urban area that also has a growth boundary and follows similar policies, Miami, is not held in the same esteem (sorry Miami). Also the Twin cities have 3.5 million people while metro Portland holds 2.5, one explanation for more dense neighborhoods.

    Plan-it I didn't know about the regional tax base sharing, that's pretty cool.
    Last edited by RPfresh; 25 Nov 2008 at 4:45 PM.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2007
    Location
    the Mountains
    Posts
    78
    While Portland is a nice place to visit and probably to live, I don't think it should be used as a planning model. Portland has very little diversity and none of the urban problems with which even moderately large eastern cities must contend. Those issues can be far more challenging than where to put the next bike trail.

    I think analyzing the successes of the twin cities is a far more useful exercise for planners in most cities.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 73
    Last post: 14 Mar 2011, 6:01 PM
  2. Greetings from the Twin Cities
    Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 08 Sep 2009, 12:56 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last post: 02 May 2009, 10:48 PM
  4. Why no amphitheater in the Twin Cities?
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 07 Aug 2005, 12:16 PM
  5. Replies: 19
    Last post: 31 May 2005, 3:00 AM