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Thread: Urban planning schools in major metro areas

  1. #1
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    Urban planning schools in major metro areas

    Which accredited planning schools arent too difficult to get in with a low gpa? I have only one preference and that is it's in a large city. I have a 3.0 gpa and graudating from a low ranked college.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    UT-Arlington - I'm in my first semester here and its been great. UT-Arlington is located in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metro Area.

  3. #3
         
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    UT-Arlington is a good suggestion. You might also look at Memphis and Louisville -- depending on where you want to live.

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    What about Ga Tech and Maryland?

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    Cyburbian
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    Maryland is in College Park, which isn't really a city but a hybrid of Jersey urban sprawl and college ghetto. You can take the train and be in Downtown DC in 20 minutes, however.

    Try UIC in Chicago. 3.0 won't kill you.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    I'll echo the above posters suggestion for UIC. I had a 3.4 from a decent state school (they dubbed themselves a "public ivy", though many schools do). I have no idea how hard it is to get in. Of course they look at more than GPA, but the worse they can do is say no.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    You might also look at Boston University (which isn't accredited, but has a couple very good teachers.) ASU is an up and coming university as well that is is in a big (if imo poorly planned) city. I had an under 3.0 gpa from a very good liberal arts school, but very good GRE, and I took some time between going back to school in which I gained life experience, and am at UNC, so different combinations can get you there.

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    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    I am about to graduate from Wayne State University in Detroit - cannot get much more urban than that!

    The university is in the heart of the city and is very actively helping to revitalize its Midtown neighborhood. The planning program is indeed accredited and I have no complaints about the education that I received there.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by jsk1983 View post
    I'll echo the above posters suggestion for UIC. I had a 3.4 from a decent state school (they dubbed themselves a "public ivy", though many schools do). I have no idea how hard it is to get in. Of course they look at more than GPA, but the worse they can do is say no.
    Likewise I got into UIC right after undergrad with a 3.25 from a decent state school. However, I decided to defer for a year and get a little work experience after speaking with my undergrad professors.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian planr's avatar
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    You should definitely check out the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities. The Minneapolis-St. Paul area is a great place to study a variety of planning issues as well as a great place to live, IF you can stand the winters.

    Also, it needs to be said that a low undergraduate GPA can easily be overcome by good GRE scores, work experience, good letters of recommendation and a good personal statement. I'm at MIT and my undergraduate was certainly less than 3.0 FWIW.
    "Try to be in two incredibly successful bands. If not, that's okay." -- Words to live by, courtesy of Dave Grohl

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    I'd second the University of Minnesota- its a great place to study planning because it has the combination of a good school and a big urban area (that is also much cheaper than east coast equivalents, which is great for quality of life as a grad student...) It is policy oriented, which is good for some and bad for others.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian The District's avatar
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    virginia tech's alexandria program--just across the river from DC.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Jakers's avatar
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    University of Cincinnati or Ohio State
    "Inside Joke"

  14. #14
    You know this is something that I think about as I contemplate grad schools.......how much of a role does geography play in your planning education?


    The University of Maryland interests me primarily because of location, location, location...........is there anyplace better for an aspring planner to be than D.C? You've in the center of government, so you're right in the middle of the action when policy changes take place........you've got several different well-known, planned communities and "new towns" in both Maryland and nearby Virginia that would serve as excellent models for study, not to mention the fact that D.C. itself is a planned city (I love the way that D.C. was planned and laid out.....absolute genius IMO).

    I think that UNC's program is very attractive, but from what I saw several years ago, the entire state of North Carolina is one big sprawl-fest. I see some people here discuss going to planning schools in cities known for their innovative and progressive planning policies (like Portland, for example). But what would it be like to study planning in a place that's located in the middle of a poorly planned area?

    Would one even dare say that a school located in such an area actually suffers from being located in a poorly planned area? If having a school located in a well-planned area is a plus, does having an M.U.P. program located in the middle of sprawl hell detract from the program itself?

  15. #15
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    Hunter College has a nice Urban Planning program, and it's right in New York.

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