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Poll results: How is your penmanship?

Voters
37. You may not vote on this poll
  • Illegable - I only print

    8 21.62%
  • I can forge a doctor's prescription

    5 13.51%
  • Like a right-handed 2nd grader using his left hand

    4 10.81%
  • Readable if I go slooowww

    5 13.51%
  • I get the message across but I'd rather send an email or a PM

    5 13.51%
  • Classic, neat, legable, like RJs

    9 24.32%
  • I'm a calligrapher

    1 2.70%
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Results 26 to 36 of 36

Thread: The Penmanship Thread, or, Show Me Your Cursive and I'll Show You Mine

  1. #26
    Cyburbian cch's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2006
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    Machesney Park, IL
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    1,437
    When I write, it is usually a combo of printing and cursive. Like, I always print my capital As and my lower-case Rs, for example (my cursive Rs always look like little bumps and not the way they are suppose to look). When I take my time, my cursive can look pretty good. But, I never take my time.

    By the way, when making a cursive M, do any of you actually make the 3 bumps like you're suppose to, and the 2 bumps for the N? I use to for a long time, but it looks so funky and I noticed that nobody else seems to do it correctly.

  2. #27
    There's a timely column in Newsweek about cursive penmanship. My daughter -- who is learning cursive right now -- is really struggling with her "n", "m", "u", "v", "w" and "q". She'd be the first to vote "screw it!".
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  3. #28
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,165
    Quote Originally posted by cch View post
    When I write, it is usually a combo of printing and cursive. Like, I always print my capital As and my lower-case Rs, for example (my cursive Rs always look like little bumps and not the way they are suppose to look). When I take my time, my cursive can look pretty good. But, I never take my time.

    By the way, when making a cursive M, do any of you actually make the 3 bumps like you're suppose to, and the 2 bumps for the N? I use to for a long time, but it looks so funky and I noticed that nobody else seems to do it correctly.
    Mines the same, a combination of cursive and print. I do the three bumps for the m and the two for the n, but only when I chose to do cursive for those letters. I think I have nice handwriting either way, but only if I take the time to do so.

    I wish I could write like they did in the early 1900's, not calligraphy, but beautiful scrolly letters.

  4. #29
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    New Town
    Posts
    3,826
    I also usually write with a print-cursive hybrid but more recently have started using cursive again. This is really only because my son writes in cursive at school and so we all started comparing handwriting. I was so appalled by my cursive when I tried (after something like a 30 year hiatus) that I have been working on it ever since. Its been about 2 months now and its looking much better. I bet even another person could read it now...

    For most of my communications, though, I type. I can't even remember the last time I wrote out an actual letter to someone (save for holiday cards). I'm a much faster typist than writer, so it tends to go a lot faster if I use the ole keyboard. And, like my handwriting, I use a combo of blind typing and hunt-and-peck (which is to say, I glance at the keyboard periodically or else mu tping looks likw thid)
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  5. #30
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    My handwriting is pretty bad. But it rarely comes up since I do most writing on a computer.

  6. #31
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
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    17,815
    I do calligraphy and have the special pen, tips, bottle of india ink, parchment and the whole nine yards that I use on special occasions (party invites and the like). However, I print with an illegible scrawl on a daily basis for work, signing checks and such.

  7. #32
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    South Milwaukee
    Posts
    8,935
    I have a condition called essential tremors. (scroll down). Often my hands shake so bad I can't even write a check. I have friends pre-address 6 months of envelopes for me. I rarely take notes in meetings, and if I do I hide my pad so no one can see my chicken scratching.

  8. #33
    Cyburbian Jakers's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Queen City
    Posts
    115
    I was taught cursive in like 2nd grade and eventually by middle school I developed my own style of writing. Mostly print with a little cursive on certain letter combinations to make it flow better. I'd like to think it is neat and easy on the eyes but, who knows for sure. Fortunately I dont see an option on the poll for this, again my life cannot be classified by A, B, C, or D.
    "Inside Joke"

  9. #34
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
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    on my 15 minute break
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    17,815

    Keyboards revisited

    BUMP

    http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/top-...TOKEN=97626570
    Seems a lot of schools are cutting cursive/penmanship from their curricula.
    I just found out they no longer teach cursive/penmanship at the elementary school I went to (the same one, incidently, that Junior will be attending next year).

    For my part I think it's a mistake to eliminate teaching the skill entirely. Yes, keyboard usage is becoming more commonplace and is replacing writing in a variety of ways apart from letter-writing (and putting the envelope into the mailbox). But they still teach manual arithmetic even though everyone has a calculator surgically attached to themselves, don't they? Well why not continue to teach cursive too? After all what good is your keyboard when the power goes out, huh?

    Keyboards, like so many other things associated with our industrialized planet, are geared towards increasing human efficiency/productivity. They do that well, but every time some technological advancement becomes widespread something gets lost in the process. The loss of this art form impoverishes human culture just a little more as far as I'm concerned.

    And what about Arabic-speaking cultures? Calligraphy is considered one of their premier art forms - will it vanish too as keyboards replace pens? Same thing with Chinese and Japanese calligraphy.

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a 480 square foot ex baseball nacho stand
    Posts
    7,032
    Wee P is in first grade and they are teaching cursive writting. She came home the other day excited that she could write her name in cursive.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  11. #36
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Where the Wild Things Are
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    2,245
    The only use I see for still learning cursive is so that you develop your own signature. Other than that, I can't even remember the last time I wrote in cursive.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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