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Thread: Urbanization of the planet [Was: 50% of the world urban...]

  1. #1
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    Urbanization of the planet [Was: 50% of the world urban...]

    http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...ing-Cities.php

    This article states the world is about 50% urban now, and around 2050 the world will be about 70% urban.

    In California, I think of it like this:

    In my county, we only have one ex-urban (extra urban) city. In that city, about 2/3 of it is urban and the rest rural or suburban. That urban population in that city is about 20,000 population. The other 25,000 people are in suburban tracts or on rural plots. Now, the rest of the county is all rural. The county has 265,000 population.

    Now, if we look at Los Angeles that has roughly 4 million people. The city is not all urban. The city's central part is urban in built form, yet the surrounding neighborhoods are suburban and rural in built form. All though, the whole city is urban. About 6 million people out of 10 million are living in an urban enviroment in that county.

    So, even if you live in a rural or suburbanish part of an urban city then u are still in an urban enviroment.

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    Cyburbian rcgplanner's avatar
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    I would agree with this finding. Just the 20 most populous metro areas in the world equal 5% of the world's population. Most of the urban areas are outside of the United States. New York is the 13th most populous city in the world, while LA is 46th.

    In the US, many urban areas are expanding into mega-regions. For example, the 400 mile drive between Raleigh, NC and Atlanta, GA, you would be hard-pressed to find many true rural areas. A Georgia Tech study called the area from Birmingham, AL to Raleigh, NC the core of Piedmont Atlantic Megaregion, with approximately 13million people living in the urban core of the region, the I-85 corridor.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megalop...#United_States is a list of the mega-regions in the United States. The big focus in regional planning over the next 40 years is going to be how to link the components of these mega-regions better. The BosWash corridor already has fairly strong transportation links, with high-speed rail, frequent flights and an extensive highway system. I think you will see similar things happening in many of these other regions, i.e., high speed rail in the southeast and midwest.

  3. #3
    Id say most of LA is legitimately city. Its certainly not rural. Most of the megacities in the world include suburban areas.

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by urban19 View post
    Now, if we look at Los Angeles that has roughly 4 million people. The city is not all urban. The city's central part is urban in built form, yet the surrounding neighborhoods are suburban and rural in built form. All though, the whole city is urban. About 6 million people out of 10 million are living in an urban enviroment in that county.
    Your an idiot. Of course it is all urban. What do you think they get their water and sewer from..septic and wells?
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

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    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    Your an idiot. Of course it is all urban. What do you think they get their water and sewer from..septic and wells?
    Yeah, I know it's all urban. But i thought areas like the San Fernando Valley was suburban in built form, and Pacific Palisades was rural. Maybe it's just a bit suburban and a bit rural in those parts? but the whole city is urban.

    hence some parts may be urban suburban or urban rural, and not just urban.

  6. #6
    Perceptions matter a lot. What is considered by many to be almost rural in Los Angeles, communities like Pacific Palisades, are considered unacceptably dense in places like the fringe of Atlanta.

    I general, when agencies talk about the majority of the planet being urban, they are talking about both inner city cores and their suburbs.

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