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Thread: Does gentrification process engender social exclusion?

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    Does gentrification process engender social exclusion?

    Hi all.. Do you think gentrification process in the city centers of so called "global cities" engenders social exclusion of the former users? Or what will be the other consequences of gentrification in terms of positive or negative?

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    In a sense I think the strict siphoning off of certain residents to particular sections of a city or neighborhood does create social barriers and limit opportunities for some. I think it is important that a good socio-economic mix be present in any given neighborhood (in fact, that's probably just simple common sense). A lack of "connection" to individuals with wealth, power or influence can block individuals and groups from forms of social mobility and influence. Though it really depends on how far and drastic the gentrification is.

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    Cyburbian CJC's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by uplanner View post
    Hi all.. Do you think gentrification process in the city centers of so called "global cities" engenders social exclusion of the former users?
    Not if there is good transit, street, and walking connectivity to all different parts of the city. It is hard to do, but not impossible. If there are other places for people to go, I don't see any problem with gentrification of areas. The problems arise when there is simply nowhere for the people being displaced to go to (without a significant decrease in living standards).
    Two wrongs don't necessarily make a right, but three lefts do.

  4. #4
    The problem for the displaced is not exclusion, which can happen even if they stay in place, its social disruption. the local, interpersonal and community connections are lost when a neighborhood's residents are dispersed across a metropolitan area.

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    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    you know the answer, it is why you ask the quesition... of course it does. gentrification is good for the local property owners, bad for the renters, good for business, good for the city... however it establishes a situation of winners and losers, as to most events. the question becomes, where do the excluded populations go and what happens to them as a community? and what role, if any, should the govt play in this process?
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

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    You might say that govt does this intentionally to displace the community they don't want in the city centres (local govt at least), both living there and using the space...?

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    Cyburbian Plan-it's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by waterdragon View post
    You might say that govt does this intentionally to displace the community they don't want in the city centres (local govt at least), both living there and using the space...?
    It is the private markets not the government that are the driving force in much of gentrification. In some cases, a public improvement process or public-private partnership will jumps starts development in an underserved area, but it is the private markets and individual decisions by property owners and business owners that fuels the larger gentrification of cities.
    Satellite City Enabler

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    Cyburbian lycosidae's avatar
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    I think the most negative effect of gentrification is mission creep assuming a goal of revitalizing neighborhoods for current residents. I think framing it in that sense is better than saying whether gentrification is good or bad for this or that reason. Sometimes, the goal of gentrification isn't to revitalize neighborhoods for current residents. In the 1950s, 60s, and 70s there were efforts to gentrify neighborhoods to push out undesirable elements (e.g. poor minorities). I don't think you'll find many programs with this goal today (at least not explicitly).

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