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Thread: Non-work community leadership posts on a resume

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    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Non-work community leadership posts on a resume

    I am having a small difference of opinion with a colleague about whether to include community service / involvement on a professional resume. This is a resume not for a particular job, but rather a detailed resume with selected project experience that I would include in proposals for consulting work (though that may not make any difference).

    I have listed such items as membership in professional organizations, my appointment to a municipal board, and serving on the boards of directors of several non-profit organizations. I think that my board positions are indicative of my volunteer contributions and leadership experience outside of the workplace.

    Does it make a difference whether I'm on the board of, say, the local chapter of the American Red Cross (a well-known organization), as opposed to something like the Smithtown Audubon Society or the Jonesville Cycling Club? One group that I serve as Treasurer has no staff, but it's a legitimate 501c3 organization that owns property and has well over 300 members.

    Two questions: 1) Do I list my board memberships on a resume, and 2) Should I exclude board memberships in certain organizations, such as those that might relate to hobbies and personal interests?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    I list volunteer activities in the final section of my resume titled something like Additional Skills and Interests. I have been told that employers want to know about this more personal stuff. They are hiring a person, after all, not just a machine. Things that make you stand out (in addition to the core skills) as interesting, dedicated, involved, etc. enhance the picture of yourself. IMHO...

    I don't spend a lot of time explaining this stuff, though. Its part of a longer list of skills and abilities: "founding board member of DeAnza Rte. 66 Association." If the topics seem too many or too unrelated to the position, I might just say "board member of various local arts and culture organizations" or some such.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mud Princess View post
    I am having a small difference of opinion with a colleague about whether to include community service / involvement on a professional resume. This is a resume not for a particular job, but rather a detailed resume with selected project experience that I would include in proposals for consulting work (though that may not make any difference).

    Two questions: 1) Do I list my board memberships on a resume, and 2) Should I exclude board memberships in certain organizations, such as those that might relate to hobbies and personal interests?
    We list board memberships on all professional resumes on proposals. This includes broad memberships to BIA, Planning Commission, City Council, Bicycle Coalitions, and other professional organizations but omit anything pertaining to religious organizations (unless of course it is pertinent to a job such as a church design/re-design).

    We have been told by our marketing department to only include those that relate to hobbies and personal interests if they somehow relate to the project we are proposing on i.e. member of the Audubon society and the project involves a habitat restoration component. This would be a perfect compliment to the job at hand. Remember, in proposals you are telling how "qualified" you are to do the job, and anything and everything that is related to the scope of work to proposed that will give you a leg up should be thrown in the resume portion.
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  4. #4
    Cyburbian Jakers's avatar
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    While I put those on my resume I do not put everything on it. Leave some for the interview, or face to face.
    "Inside Joke"

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Remember folks, mud princess question is in reference to a professional job, i.e. consultant work in response to either a) an RFP or b) sole source contract work to which SOQ is requested.
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  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    If it's a resume within a bid submittal, leave out any extraneous stuff that has nothing to do with the project your team is working towards.

    Proposals can sometimes be 50-100 pages in length depending on the project. Your personal involvement in the American Red Cross, however rewarding, isn't going to carry as much weight as the proposed buget, scope of services, team credentials, or awards (optional) unless:

    (A) the potential client is the American Red Cross or similar organization and/or
    (B) one or more of the proposal reviewers is personally affiliated with the American Red Cross or similar organization.

    With so many responses to proposals (sometimes 3-4 times as high than even a year ago) communities are flooded with applicants for contracts. Some potential clients spend little time on the resumes, only focusing on the team member's degrees, credentials, and awards.

    However, if you are involved in a industry-related organization (APA, ULI, ASLA, USGBC, etc.) I would note that on the resume regardless.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
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  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    I have a ten-year employment gap, so you bet that I include volunteer activities that I participated in during that time. They are on a separate page that is titled "Community Activities" or something like that. I made it a separate page in case I don't need to use it.

    It helped me to get the job I have, and I wanted to show that I was more than a cafeteria volunteer when I did not have a job.

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