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Thread: Construction and demolition recycling facility

  1. #1
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Construction and demolition recycling facility

    My municipality is considering changing our current zoning ordinance to allow Construction & Demolition (C&D) facilities in certain industrial districts.

    Does your municipality have specific language relating to C & D facilities? Are there any C & D facilities in your municpality? If so, what issues/concerns have you noticed?

    We've just begun our research and I'd love to get others input.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    For some clarity - Please describe what you understand to be the typical activities that occur at such facilities, just in case some of us call this by a different name.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman View post
    For some clarity - Please describe what you understand to be the typical activities that occur at such facilities, just in case some of us call this by a different name.
    Sorry, to clarify:

    Construction & Demolition RECYCLING Facility

    At a mixed construction & demolition recycling facility, different recyclables are sorted from a load of mixed construction waste. If waste is taken to a mixed C&D facility, a contractor can put all C&D materials into one bin and be sure that the majority of it will be recycled.

    According to project based studies, well above 70% of building construction and demolition (C&D) wastes can be reused and recycled . Concrete, asphalt, metals, wood, dry wall, asphalt shingles, plastics, tile, carpet, cabinetry, fixtures, and more can be recovered from construction and demolition projects to be reused, recycled, or repurposed.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Moderator note:
    Thread title has been edited accordingly.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    In our county an applicant to zoning board wanted to operate a facility that would grind up concrete and similar materials from demolition to make a usable fill material commonly called "crusher run". Withdrew before a vote was done.

    I've heard of research studies done on recycle/reuse of manufactured homes that showed real problems with feasibility.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    I do not have specific experience in writing an ordinance for C&D recycling center/landfill but you may want to check http://www.waltoncountyga.gov/ as they have a few facilities located in their county.

    From my little experience these types of facilities create a lot of noise, vibration and dust not to mention large mounds of processed material. If I were to write something for this I would be sure to require additional, planted buffers against adjacent properties, dust surpression system, limit the height of mounding and limited hours of operation. I think for the most part this type of business is great to have but ensuring it operates as it is supposed to is the hard part for any government. You would want to strictly define what can be recycled at the facility as you don't want it to turn into a transfer station for material going to a landfill.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Dandy, you might want to talk to your state or county health department since these types of industries are sometimes limited by other agencies higher than a town or county zoning ordinance.

    I would put this in an HI zone and maybe make it a conditional use with buffer requirements, hours of operations, and dust control measures.

    "Wow, I totally didn't even see Shell_waster's post before I posted."

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    Construction & Demolition RECYCLING Facility

    At a mixed construction & demolition recycling facility, different recyclables are sorted from a load of mixed construction waste. If waste is taken to a mixed C&D facility, a contractor can put all C&D materials into one bin and be sure that the majority of it will be recycled.
    In our county an applicant to zoning board wanted to operate a facility that would grind up concrete and similar materials from demolition to make a usable fill material commonly called "crusher run". Withdrew before a vote was done.
    I think you're talking about two different animals here.

    One homebuilder I work for has two different 30 yard dumpsters on site. One is from a "recycling" firm, as described in the first quote, and the second is from a simple municipal waste type disposal firm, and whatever goes in there goes straight to the landfill. They'd flip if anyone disposed of concrete or masonry in either of them. That's the sort of thing that can be buried for free as fill in lots of places. It doesn't need to pay for a home in a landfill, and it's not what the recycling place is looking for. I'd be interested to know whether the facility in question makes the same distinction.

    (On edit: Here's a cut and paste directly from their website:

    At our eight-acre plant we process a wide variety of recyclables ranging from curb side, municipally collected materials
    to commercially generated cardboard, all grades of printers paper, office paper, newspaper and scrap metal.


    No mention of concrete or masonry)



    I know there are portable crushing operations similar to what's described in the second quote. Essentially they're the same sort of equipment you might find as a more semi-permanent fixture in a quarry. I don't know of any around here, dedicated to recycling, that are permanently located. That might be simply a function of market economics. Construction aggregates are pretty readily available around here. Maybe in a larger market, or one where aggregates had to come from further away, or dump sites were harder to find, that would be economically feasible...

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    From long term memory, this might not be complete....

    -Material Saftey Data Sheets
    -Any vehicle - if any - must be drained of fluids prior to storage in site (not always C&D but can be. They creep in when you;re not looking.)
    -Screening
    -Quarterly fire inspection
    -Limited hours of operation for noise reasons

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