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Thread: Denver, Colorado: Berkeley

  1. #1
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Denver, Colorado: Berkeley

    About 11 years ago, I bought my very first house ever in Berkeley, a then working-class neighborhood in Northwest Denver about three miles/five kilometers from downtown, that was starting to experience an influx of artists and young homebuyers that were priced out of other neighborhoods in the city. Today, Berkeley is in full-on gentrification mode, but retains more of its old-school flavor compared to West Highland to the south.

    From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley,_Denver,_Colorado

    Berkeley is a city-center neighborhood in Denver, Colorado, located northwest of the original city site, today on the west side of Interstate 25. The neighborhood is bounded by Federal Boulevard on the east, Interstate 70 on the north, Sheridan Boulevard on the West and 38th avenue on the south. Berkeley is part of the area traditionally called North Denver. It is bordered by the West Highland neighborhood on the south and is often casually grouped together with the Highlands. The neighborhood contains two lakes surrounded by parks, one eponymous near 46th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard and Rocky Mountain Lake Park on Lowell Boulevard and 46th.



















































































    My old house; the owners that bought it made a major addition known in Denverese as "popping the top".


    My old house


    My old house































    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #2
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Looks like it was/is a great little comfy neighborhood. That residential architecture is wonderful.

    I'm sure there is some requirement regarding it (historic district, maybe), but the way "the top was popped" on your old house is the worst way to do it. It's really clumsy and awkward. I see those type of additions all the time and it usually isn't executed well.

    They should have just expanded the new second floor to the entire footprint and mimicked the eave treatment from the first floor.

    Thanks for sharing.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Ah...yes.....

    A sweet neighborhood! Downtown Denver/LODO is only a few minutes away by bike or foot It is also where I would meet with a study group for the AICP exam in late 1997
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

  4. #4
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Here's my old house before the top was popped.



    After, for comparison:

    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    It's still an awkward addition, and your comparison photos confirm it. I realize the owners that built the addition probably didn't want to or couldn't have the new second floor include the entire footprint of the house, but it would have been much better.

    Meh...C'est la vie.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Plus
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    When I was back in Denver for the APA Conference I stayed with a friend who lives in the neighborhood. Very Nice indeed.

    On pop tops - I remember when I lived there it being a big issue in the Washington Park area.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    At least the pop top is to the rear where it's a bit less visible from the street.

    That neighborhood looks a lot like a particular neighborhood in my town, down to the architectural variety and the inclusion of the "non-lawn" as I refer to it. The only difference is the alley's, really.

    As for the business area, it looks like a good mix of uses. I like how some of the old houses were adaptively re-used for the businesses. Whoever allowed that giant ugly billboard on the lot of their nice, historic house/building should be shot, though.

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