Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Noise regulation measurements

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    6

    Noise regulation measurements

    There is a new hospital development expansion in our municipality that will include a large generator for the facilities. This has raised some concerns regarding the noise it will generate to surrounding residential properties.

    With that said, I was wondering if any one can share how, what and who measures noise output levels in you municipality for noise regulations. Preferably in a similarly size community. Ours has a population of just over 100 K.

    We have an old piece of equipment (1565-B Sound Level Meter from General Radio USA) that Im doubtful of its accuracy. I am also clueless about its calibration as Im sure it needs one.

    I'm considering downloading audio metering software from the net to my laptop and using that instead to measure the current noise levels of the generator in place now.

    Any help or input would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    New Town
    Posts
    3,761
    You can link to download a Word file of Albuquerque's noise ordinance here. It has definitions and the ordinance itself. They use an A-weighted sound pressure monitoring system measured in decibels (notated as dB(A)). "A" being the ambient noise level. So, violators must be shown to exceed the ambient noise level by a certain amount. There are different criteria for time of day and setting.

    http://www.cabq.gov/envhealth/noise.html

    Obviously we are a larger city - about 500k in the City proper - but hopefully this is helpful. Using the ambient noise as a baseline, it shouldn't matter if your community is 400 or 4 million as it accounts for the general din of activity in any given setting.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    17,469
    I've used a number of different noise meters over the course of career but my favorite happens to be the current one - an Extech model 407736. Easy to use and accurate enough for code enforcement. I am not familiar with the model you mentioned so I really can't attest to its' accuracy.

    Dang, that sounded like a commercial.

    Concerning "accuracy" (yeah there's a reason it's in quotes) in measuring noise levels for code enforcement, you may already be aware, but if not it's useful to know that no matter how sensitive your equipment it's easy to get poor/inaccurate readings whenever you take sound levels in urban environments. The good models are pretty directional but you can still pick up extraneous traffic, wind, and other noises (windscreens help but are not infallible). Probably the best time to measure a sound level is in the middle of the night.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, Where are you from? doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    6
    Below is the bulk of what our zoning ordinance regulates for Industrial Zoning in relation to Residential. In our municipality, zoning enforcement is done by the Planning Dept. and Inspections Department (containing Code Enforcement) does other non zoning ordinance enforcement.

    11.2.a. Noise.
    (1) Prohibition of Noise Pollution. No person shall cause or allow the emission of sound beyond property lines so as to cause noise pollution or a nuisance in Peoria, or so as to violate any provision of this Zoning Code.
    (2) Measurement Techniques. Test procedures to determine whether emission of sound is in conformance with this regulation shall be in substantial conformity with Standards and Recommended Practices established by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. (ANSI), and the latest revisions thereof, including ANSI S1.1-1960, ANSI S1.6-1967, ANSI S1.8-1969, ANSI S1.2-1962, ANSI S1.4-1971--Type 1 Precision, ANSI S1.11-1966 and ANSI S1.13-1971 Field Method.
    (3) Sound Emitted to Residential (R) Districts During Daytime Hours. Except as elsewhere provided in this regulation, no use shall cause or allow the emission of sound during daytime hours from any noise source located in any industrial district (I District) to any receiving residential district (R District) which exceeds the allowable octave band sound pressure level specified in Table 1, when measured at any point within such receiving R District; provided, however, that no measurement of sound pressure levels shall be made less than twenty-five (25) feet from such noise source.

    TABLE 1. ALLOWABLE OCTAVE BAND SOUND
    TABLE INSET:

    Octave Band Center Frequency (hertz) -- Pressure Levels (db) of Sound Emitted to any Receiving R District from an I District
    31.5 - 72
    63 - 71
    125 - 65
    250 - 57
    500 - 51
    1000 - 45
    2000 - 39
    4000 - 34
    8000 - 32

    (4) Sound Emitted to an R District During Nighttime Hours. Except as elsewhere provided in this regulation, no use shall cause or allow the emission of sound during nighttime hours from any noise source located in an Industrial District to any receiving R district which exceeds any allowable octave band sound pressure level specified in Table 2, when measured at any point within such receiving R district; provided, however, that no measurement of sound pres-sure levels shall be made less than twenty-five (25) feet from such noise source.

    TABLE 2. ALLOWABLE OCTAVE BAND SOUND
    TABLE INSET:

    Octave Band Center Frequency (hertz) - Pressure Levels (db) of Sound Emitted to any Receiving R District from an I District
    31.5 - 63
    63 - 61
    125 - 55
    250 - 47
    500 - 40
    1000 - 35
    2000 - 30
    4000 - 25
    8000 - 25



    http://www.municode.com/Resources/ga...d=10183&sid=13

    The hospital as you might guess, is zoned Institutional in which noise regs are currently not regulated as for Industrial but the noise concerns are present nonetheless.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    6,912

    Sweet!

    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I've used a number of different noise meters over the course of career but my favorite happens to be the current one - an Extech model 407736. Easy to use and accurate enough for code enforcement. I am not familiar with the model you mentioned so I really can't attest to its' accuracy.

    Dang, that sounded like a commercial.

    Concerning "accuracy" (yeah there's a reason it's in quotes) in measuring noise levels for code enforcement, you may already be aware, but if not it's useful to know that no matter how sensitive your equipment it's easy to get poor/inaccurate readings whenever you take sound levels in urban environments. The good models are pretty directional but you can still pick up extraneous traffic, wind, and other noises (windscreens help but are not infallible). Probably the best time to measure a sound level is in the middle of the night.
    I like the price of teh 407736:

    http://www.allprosound.com/catalog/p...tech-%20407736
    Skilled Adoxographer

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 0
    Last post: 02 Jan 2011, 6:38 AM
  2. CEQA LOS alternative measurements
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 09 Apr 2008, 12:30 AM
  3. Shoreline zonng measurements
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 25 Aug 2006, 12:03 PM
  4. Baseball field measurements
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 29 Apr 2005, 12:39 AM
  5. Help! There's this noise...
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 12
    Last post: 22 Nov 2004, 11:51 AM