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Thread: School-age children generation factors

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    Cyburbian
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    School-age children generation factors

    Looking for some help regarding best practices for developing school-age children generation factors. If you have info or links to papers that address the subject it would be greatly appreciated.

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by smccutchan1 View post
    Looking for some help regarding best practices for developing school-age children generation factors. If you have info or links to papers that address the subject it would be greatly appreciated.
    A fair number of cities are generating # of students by housing type. Is this the sort of thing you are looking for?

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by smccutchan1 View post
    Looking for some help regarding best practices for developing school-age children generation factors. If you have info or links to papers that address the subject it would be greatly appreciated.
    Start with the state board of education. Usually they have a base factor to and districts can move from their with their own studies. Typically there are different numbers for attached and detached residential buildings.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

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    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    A fair number of cities are generating # of students by housing type. Is this the sort of thing you are looking for?

    Exactly and thank you for helping me to clarify my thoughts. The city and school district I am working with is using a one size fits all formula that assumes that since it was created as an average than it works just to apply the generation factors across the board of housing types. The analysis I am looking at is a TOD that has five different housing types many of which are not designed to be appropriate for families with school age children (such as single bedroom lofts / flats).

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    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
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    There is a study done for the Citizen's Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA) in Boston, MA that looked into this exact issue. It used PUMS data by housing type to generate population (including school-age children) generation rates. It's kind of old now, but since ACS PUMS data has a much smaller sample size, the best recent PUMS data in the US is still from the 2000 Census. Check out Appendix A.

    http://www.chapa.org/pdf/Fiscal_LongReport.pdf

    The data is specific to Massachusetts, but it wouldn't be difficult to do it for any area covered by a PUMA. The key is to make sure you have enough observations to be statistically significant.

    There are also similar tables in Burchell's "Fiscal Impact Guide to New Development," but those use data from the 1980's.

    EDIT: Oops, my bad, the data source for those is actually 1990 PUMS. 2000 PUMS wasn't yet available when that report was done. Still, the method would be the same.

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    Cyburbian
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    JimPlans, thanks for the excellent reference. Just looking at the Table of Contents the document seems to include info that will be helpful if not definitive.

    Others out there, still looking for additional references if you have them.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by smccutchan1 View post
    Exactly and thank you for helping me to clarify my thoughts. The city and school district I am working with is using a one size fits all formula that assumes that since it was created as an average than it works just to apply the generation factors across the board of housing types. The analysis I am looking at is a TOD that has five different housing types many of which are not designed to be appropriate for families with school age children (such as single bedroom lofts / flats).
    I have one from my old place's school district (very professional and progressive) that does this by DU/ac, found here (pp 25-27) that may make this easier for you. AIUI they got the idea from elsewhere and adapted to the demographics there.

    Good luck.

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