Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: MRED over MUP, in depth question needs advice please

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2009
    Location
    New City
    Posts
    47

    MRED over MUP, in depth question needs advice please

    So after much research and time spent figuring out what I want to do I have decided to go to grad school for architecture. I want to, however, try and either apply to a program with a dual degree in either urban planning or a masters in real estate development, or go back to school after my masters in architecture degree to obtain this extra degree. What I am trying to figure out is which one will better suit my career goals. I have an undergraduate degree in environmental planning and through the course of my undergraduate experience I have developed a desire to really "design" or "build" communities/areas/regions/towns around concepts of sustainability and more efficient means of energy usage. I want to use my architecture degree to develop sustainable architecture, but I would also like to one day try and develop sustainable areas on a larger scale instead of one building at a time. I feel that locating certain business in close proximity to one another will allow for unique synergistic conglomerations to form. I read a book called the "Ecology of Commerce" and they state a case study in Denmark which I found amazingly fascinating:

    "A coal-fired plant, an oil refinery, a pharmaceutical comany specializing in biotechnology, a sheetrock plant, concrete producers, a producer of sulfuric acid, municipal heating authorities, a fish farm, some greenhouses, local farms, and other enterprises work cooperatively with one another. The refinery produces surplus gas, which was not used prior to 191 because of the sulfur. After installing a sulfur removal system the gas could be sold to the sheetrock factory, as well as the coal fired utility (saving 30,000 tons of coal). The sulfur being retrieved was sold to the chemical company. The sulfur removal system also produces calcium slufate, which they will be selling to sheetrock factory as well as a substitute for mined gypsum (reducing resource depletion). The fly ash from coal generation is used in road construction and concrete production. Waste heat from the refinery is used to warm the waters of a fish farm that produces 200 tons of turbot and trout sold on the market, while its fish sludge goas to local farmers as fertilizers."

    The unique synergistic associations go on and on. Through unique design, and business location, the conditions necessary for such associations was made available. While my initial goal is to design buildings to be more sustainable, I want to try and create conditions like the one stated above. I find it extraordinary how through unique design and proper planning these types of conglomerations can be created.

    My question is ontop of receiving my Architecture Masters degree which would be a good degree to lead me in this direction? I really want to make an impact on the built environment and the more and more I am learning about the planning profession, I feel it is more based on bureaucratic and policy issues, not so much the design and built environment. I know that The City College of New York offers a one year Urban Design masters after you recieve the Masters of Architecture degree, and maybe this would be a better route for me to take. I am still trying to figure out exactly what the MRED would allow me to do, but if anyone has any insight for me I would really appreciate it. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2009
    Location
    New City
    Posts
    47
    out of 126 views no one can offer any insight?

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2007
    Location
    America's Happiest City
    Posts
    4,909
    I think plenty of us said you need to do some soul searching. Sustainability principals, designing, etc really can be mastered by getting a master in landscape architecture imo. Some of us have already said that. The arch degree is complete overkill, but if you want to spend the money go right ahead.
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 1998
    Location
    Greensburg, Kansas
    Posts
    2,951
    Can one obtain a Masters in Architecture without first having a B Arch? If so, this is a new thing.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    I think plenty of us said you need to do some soul searching. Sustainability principals, designing, etc really can be mastered by getting a master in landscape architecture imo. Some of us have already said that. The arch degree is complete overkill, but if you want to spend the money go right ahead.
    After hearing more and more about architects and engineers (in some states) having the authority to stamp landscape architects' drawings, an architecture degree (in general, not necessarily specific to this post) "might" be a better way to go. This does not mean that all architects are capable of doing landscape architecture work.

    If you already have a BArch you can complete an MArch program in less time (shave off a year or two).
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  6. #6
    Cyburbian The District's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire Seacoast
    Posts
    374
    i have an MRED and a planning undergrad. MRED's vary in their course contents, so you'll get a different skill set based on where you go to school.

    it seems like you have a lot of different interests, and your career will not likely be long enough to master them all. not to be a group thinker, but you probably do need some soul searching.

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered
    Aug 2008
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    7
    Not all schools offer an MArch for students who hold an unrelated bach degree. Some do....It is not a typical MS as it usually requires 3+ years to earn this degree. I am familiar with the program at Arizona State and I am sure there are several other schools with similar programs. http://design.asu.edu/sala/program.shtml, the link should provide you with a lot of information. Note that the page is interactive and you need to look for MARCH+3. You will also notice the optional "joint masters" associated. You can essentially obtain an MARCH in 3.5 years and add an MBA, MLA, MUD with the addition of one more year of study at ASU. ASU also offers an MRED that can be obtained in one year. It's all possible but it will take you some time and money.

    You also need to keep in mind that after you spend 3+ years in school obtaining your MArch, you will need to do 3 more years of internship work experience before you can sit for the ARE. Passing all the exams will prob take you at least one more year so you are really looking at about 7+ years before you can even dream of starting your own firm. You throw in the joint masters and it's 8+ years. You have a lot to think about.

    It sounds like you have a strong interest in business and an entrepreneurial spirit, maybe an MBA would help you to get a grasp on what it takes to start, run, operate etc. a succesful business and then you can simply employ an architect or hire one as a consultant to help you achieve your business goals. Good Luck!

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. ASU MRED?
    Student Commons
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 05 Mar 2010, 12:25 PM
  2. MRED programs
    Student Commons
    Replies: 0
    Last post: 12 Dec 2009, 10:37 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last post: 02 Apr 2007, 9:39 AM
  4. Depth to width issue
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 14 Feb 2007, 10:57 PM
  5. Viable depth for storefront bays
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 10 Jun 2005, 5:55 PM