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Thread: Bastrop, Texas: a mountain town without the mountains

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Bastrop, Texas: a mountain town without the mountains

    Even though it's 30 miles southeast of Austin, in the Lost Pines Forest, Bastrop seems to have the feel of a mountain town to me. Maybe it's the pine trees and lush tree canopy that makes the town look like it belongs in a region with a cooler climate.

    From Wikipedia

    Spanish soldiers lived temporarily at the current site of Bastrop as early as 1804, when a fort was established where the Old San Antonio Road crossed the Colorado River and named Puesta del Colorado.

    Bastrop's namesake, Felipe Enrique Neri, Baron de Bastrop (he was actually a commoner named Philip Hendrik Nering Bogel wanted for embezzlement in his native country of the Netherlands), assisted Moses and Stephen F. Austin in obtaining land grants in Texas, and he served as S.F. Austin's land commissioner.

    In 1827, Stephen F. Austin located 100 families in an area adjacent to his earlier Mexican contracts. Austin arranged for Mexican officials to name a new town there after the baron who died the same year

    On June 8, 1832, the town was platted along conventional Mexican lines, with a square in the center and blocks set aside for public buildings and officially named Bastrop, but two years later the Coahuila y Texas legislature renamed it Mina in honor of Francisco Javier Mina, a Mexican martyr and hero. The town was incorporated under the laws of Texas on December 18, 1837, and the name changed back to Bastrop.

    Overlooking the center of the town is the Lost Pines Forest. Composed of loblolly pine, the forest is the center of the westernmost stand of the southern pine forest. As the only timber available in the area, the forest contributed to the local economy. Bastrop began supplying Austin with lumber in 1839 and then San Antonio, the western Texas frontier, and into Mexico.

    The first edition of The Bastrop Advertiser and County News (now just The Bastrop Advertiser) was published on March 1, 1853, giving it claim to being the oldest continuously published weekly (semi-weekly since September 5, 1977) in the state of Texas.

    A fire in 1862 destroyed most of downtown Bastrop's commercial buildings and the county courthouse. Thus, most current downtown structures post date the Civil War.

    In 1979, the National Register of Historic Places admitted 131 Bastrop buildings and sites to its listings. This earned Bastrop the title of the "Most Historic Small Town in Texas."







































































    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #2
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Yes.....

    It does have that vibe!

    The place seems both rugged and weathered at the same time It kind of reminds me of a small Maine village with those cape cod'ish looking small homes and all the brush/trees I was expecting to see a waterfront full of salty fellows at some point, not a Texas highway...ha ha ha....
    Skilled Adoxographer

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    Cyburbian azmodela's avatar
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    I like the look of this town!

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    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Bastrop is also known for chewing up and spitting out decent planners on a fairly routine basis. Hasn't been as bad recently, but for a while that place was a revolving door. Very interesting little city with tons of history.

    EDIT: Mountain town without the mountain is perhaps one of the best descriptions I have heard for Bastrop. Did you go further east on Highway 21? There is an incredibly beautiful drive if you continue further east on Highway 21 for about another 5-10 miles.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Are metal, steeply-pitched roofs common in this part of Texas?

    There was a resurgence in the so-called Acadian roof in Louisiana in the 1980s. Even houses in the toney subdivisions were being built with steep metal roofs.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

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    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    Very nice little town. Where are the pine trees, though? Didn't see any.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hey??

    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    Did you go further east on Highway 21? There is an incredibly beautiful drive if you continue further east on Highway 21 for about another 5-10 miles.
    Isn't that where that Jeepers Creepers creature lives??
    Skilled Adoxographer

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    EDIT: Mountain town without the mountain is perhaps one of the best descriptions I have heard for Bastrop. Did you go further east on Highway 21? There is an incredibly beautiful drive if you continue further east on Highway 21 for about another 5-10 miles.
    I actually approached Bastrop from the east. It really didn't feel like I was in Texas along that stretch of road.

    Yeah, I've also heard the same thing about the planner churn they have.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Ok....

    Will someone please photoshop in some mountains on a few of the pictures of this town???
    Skilled Adoxographer

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