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Thread: Following up after resume

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Following up after resume

    Is it a good idea to do a follow up call/e-mail after sending in your resume? I have heard that HR people can get tiered of receving follow ups. Is it better to do a e-mail follow up over calling them? How long should you wait untill a follow up? before the job deadline or after to give them time to shift through all the resumes?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by buckie33 View post
    Is it a good idea to do a follow up call/e-mail after sending in your resume? I have heard that HR people can get tiered of receving follow ups. Is it better to do a e-mail follow up over calling them? How long should you wait untill a follow up? before the job deadline or after to give them time to shift through all the resumes?

    Thanks
    Every application I have sent out this year I have done a few things as a "follow" up.

    I call approximately 2 to 3 days after i send off the application to ask if they received it. Than I ask a few follow up questions:
    How many applications received (thus far or expect)
    What is the process for hiring the position if the listing didn't have any info
    How/when candidates will be notified for interviews


    Yea, the HR department maybe weary of calls, but they are HR. Everytime I have called the departments, they have been kind and helpful. It's been refreshing. Even when I have followed up after 2 weeks if I haven't heard anything after the closing date, some HR departments have been apologetic about not getting back to folks (one even complimented my resume package). You shouldn't feel bad. Your doing your part, they just need to do theirs.
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    It depends on how you send the resume and if there is a deadline. I usually prefer to send my application packet by mail versus an online application because I have a digital portfolio in special packaging in addition to the resume, cover letter, and application (if needed). I send it by snail mail to cut down on costs (it is in a bubble-wrap envelope) so I usually give them a week to receive the packet, and then another week to go through with everything before calling (so 2 weeks out). If there is a deadline, some agencies/firms will start reviewing applications as soon as they receive them, some will wait until after the deadline (in which case I wait a week before calling).

    If the application is submitted online, I will usually wait a week before calling. Pay careful attention to the ad: some companies explicitly state that they will not receive phone calls regarding inquiries (so you should leave them alone). Some companies may only contact you if they are interested in an interview. I would still make a follow-up call in this case, but again, wait at least a week or so. So many of these places are deluged with applicants that they can't go through them quickly.

    If I receive a rejection, I thank them for getting back to me. I mention that I spent a considerable amount of time tailoring the applicaton, resume, cover letter, and portfolio for the position (6-7 hours on average per advertised job, although I don't mention this to them) and that I would be very grateful if they could tell me what I was lacking and how I could be a better candidate for them. You have nothing to loose asking this provided you are respectful, and sometimes they will give you an honest answer. I have learned that a well-prepared portfolio combined with a tailored application packet will leave an impression with staff, even if you aren't selected for an interview.

    Finally, make it a point of sending out as many tailored application packets as you can. Don't wait by the phone for a response, no matter how well you fit in with this job. A good interview is never a guarantee that you earned the job, only a letter of offer.

    Hope this helps-
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  4. #4
    Member
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    Follow-ups

    I'm not keen on follow-up calls. I conduct interviews and choose new entry level planners for our group and I really don't want to get calls from folks I'm going to interview. I wouldn't care if you contacted HR to see if your application made it ok to the office, but I wouldn't want the call myself (I don't see the apps until they've been vetted for the minimum requirements by HR). And yes, HR will give out my name and number to the applicants.

    We have a highly structured hiring process and it is designed to make sure no one applicant has an advantage during the interview process (same room, same interview team, same interview questions, etc.). I wouldn't want anyone thinking that they had an upper hand by chatting up the interviewer prior to the interview. Besides all that, it is uncomfortable since I'm not going to tell you how many applicants we have or what the competition is like.

    What is much more important to us as a group, is chemistry. We are only going to interview people who, on paper at least, are qualified. The interview is to see if the candidate is going to fit in to the group and whether or not the person has the temperament to work in a very busy office with a highly complex workload. there's not much light down here in the dungeon either. So the "Hi just wanted to to touch base with you" call doesn't really accomplish much in our case.

    As far as a follow-up afterwards? I don't think it makes much difference. I guess you could do so as a courtesy, but it doesn't hold much sway for me.

    Concentrate on being the best candidate for the job. Know something about the organization, know something about the job, relax and have a conversation with the interviewer rather than just answering questions. The people that just talk to me while the answer the questions usually do well.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    One more very important question.....

    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    Every application I have sent out this year I have done a few things as a "follow" up.

    I call approximately 2 to 3 days after i send off the application to ask if they received it. Than I ask a few follow up questions:
    How many applications received (thus far or expect)
    What is the process for hiring the position if the listing didn't have any info
    How/when candidates will be notified for interviews


    Yea, the HR department maybe weary of calls, but they are HR. Everytime I have called the departments, they have been kind and helpful. It's been refreshing. Even when I have followed up after 2 weeks if I haven't heard anything after the closing date, some HR departments have been apologetic about not getting back to folks (one even complimented my resume package). You shouldn't feel bad. Your doing your part, they just need to do theirs.
    #4 Don't forget to ask if the position was already open to internal applicant's and if not, how many internal applicant's are being considered in the current pool?

    If you are competing against any internal applicant's, drop your chances for an interview by 50% or more (My experience anyway)
    Skilled Adoxographer
    I have two emotions....Silence and Rage

  6. #6
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    If I receive a rejection, I thank them for getting back to me. I mention that I spent a considerable amount of time tailoring the applicaton, resume, cover letter, and portfolio for the position (6-7 hours on average per advertised job, although I don't mention this to them) and that I would be very grateful if they could tell me what I was lacking and how I could be a better candidate for them.
    Have you had any responses to this? In my experience, they don't want to, or don't have the time to be, bothered.

    In the past I've ended up with interviews through recruiters that found my resume online, withour even seeing a portfolio. Now its a whole different game. I think employers must be getting deluged with resumes for every job posted. I wonder if stating that you are tailoring your resume/portfolio for the job suggests that you are getting a little "creative" with it.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    Stating that I tailored my resume/portfolio simply means I spent considerable time identifying their needs and convincing them I was the right person for the job. I don't see it as a just a sneaky or "creative" way to whittle an explanation. To answer your question, roughly 50-75% of the people I ask will usually take the time and give me an explanation. Granted, the portfolio is one-of-a-kind so it will leave at least some impression in their minds, good or bad.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

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