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Thread: Job postings on other sites, and lack of salary range

  1. #1
    Cyburbian vagaplanner's avatar
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    Job postings on other sites, and lack of salary range

    Why all of a sudden are most of the jobs on Planning.org and Planetizen not showing salary ranges? Most of them say "open", which is normal for the private sector jobs, but now even the public sector jobs say that. These sites and Cyburbia should make it a policy to not accept public sector job ads unless they have a salary range.

    We shouldn't have to play a guessing game and waste time with the interview process if the job is not even going to pay what we expect. BTW, I've always heard that we shouldn't discuss salary until later in the interview process. So I may or may not pursue a job based on the listed salary range, otherwise it could be major waste of my time.

    Sorry for the ramble!!
    ...my lifestyle determines my death style!
    - Metallica

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by vagaplanner View post
    Why all of a sudden are most of the jobs on Planning.org and Planetizen not showing salary ranges? Most of them say "open", which is normal for the private sector jobs, but now even the public sector jobs say that. These sites and Cyburbia should make it a policy to not accept public sector job ads unless they have a salary range.

    We shouldn't have to play a guessing game and waste time with the interview process if the job is not even going to pay what we expect. BTW, I've always heard that we shouldn't discuss salary until later in the interview process. So I may or may not pursue a job based on the listed salary range, otherwise it could be major waste of my time.

    Sorry for the ramble!!
    I hope you aren't limiting your job prospects to just planning.org and planetizen. I check about 150 sites everyday that are likely to have planning jobs (and no I am not divulging that list!). In fact I am weary of any jobs that are posted on the main national job boards because they are bound to be flooded with applicants.

    I stray away from salary as much as possible. If I see a job that I am interested in and I'm qualified for, I will go ahead and apply. If the job advertises something below my range, then no, I won't apply for it. However, I'm not going to demand that they post their salary. As the applicant, I am in no position to make that kind of a demand. It signals to the employer that I am only concerned about making money, and would jump ship the minute something better comes along. I have been on a few interviews in the past, some even to the second round, where I still didn't have a clear picture about salary. That can always be worked out later.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  3. #3
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Don't know if this will help, but on most of my resumes that have gone to positions posted as "open" I have included my salary history with each position. If they call me for an interview, then I tend to presume that the position pays in the range of what I am currently making. They aren't going to waste their time interviewing somebody that is unaffordable. Seems like most employment applications want salary history anyway, so I just go ahead and put it out there.

    Wanting to know the salary doesn't necessarily mean that the applicant in purely motivated by money and will jump at the first opportunity. Vagaplanner may just know exactly what he needs to make in order to comfortably make ends meet and wants to ensure the job is consistent with that need.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  4. #4
    Cyburbian vagaplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    Don't know if this will help, but on most of my resumes that have gone to positions posted as "open" I have included my salary history with each position. If they call me for an interview, then I tend to presume that the position pays in the range of what I am currently making. They aren't going to waste their time interviewing somebody that is unaffordable. Seems like most employment applications want salary history anyway, so I just go ahead and put it out there.

    Wanting to know the salary doesn't necessarily mean that the applicant in purely motivated by money and will jump at the first opportunity. Vagaplanner may just know exactly what he needs to make in order to comfortably make ends meet and wants to ensure the job is consistent with that need.
    That does help SR. I don't currently have my salary history on my resume', but will put it on there. Thanks.
    ...my lifestyle determines my death style!
    - Metallica

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    When in doubt I call, or just don't apply. I too expect it in the private sector but the public sector jobs should always have a range, determining if that range is the hiring range or the total range often requires a call to HR. I don't know about putting my salary on a resume, I obviously want to make more than past positions and you may be selling yourself short that way, always make them offer first I've been taught. However, many application processes require salary in the application.
    @GigCityPlanner

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    My salary history is on my complete employment history, which runs four pages and lists just about everything since a college (undergrad) internship. It's a second-wave document.

    I created it because a muni application had three spaces for previous jobs. Three. And after a two-hour "in-box" assessment, followed by a mock presentation to "council," they clammed me because I had filled in the three lines with my pertinent experiences.

    Keep in mind that someone reviewing your salary info can use it to guess your age, general philosophies, and so forth. I would supply a requested range when asked, but I wouldn't tell them up front what I've been making the last few jobs.

    HTH

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    I agree. The salary should be posted. But as I have found out as younger planner, there are many baby boomers willing to accept ANY salary in this market. I really dont like to put my salary on a CV....I just say its open to learning more about the position and the company. What are your thoughts?

  8. #8
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    For public positions, the range should be posted. I remember wasting a day of my time, and an afternoon of an interview panel, because my family could not live on the offered salary. As for some other posts, I would never list a salary history when I was younger. $30,000 in the southeast might be the same as $55,000 in the northeast. HR may only see the numbers out of context.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee View post
    For public positions, the range should be posted.
    I don't know if this applies nationally or just California, but each municipality is required to post a "job description" and salary range. Typically a salary range can be found under the description or buried within a budget. It just takes research. But than again, in this economy, does it matter?
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

  10. #10
    Cyburbian vagaplanner's avatar
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    All good points. It's just frustrating when I spend the time on a job application, as in one recent case, and find the salary was around $20,000/year. Even being unemployed, I'm not gonna waste my time with that nonsense. I could make that much at the local supermarket.
    ...my lifestyle determines my death style!
    - Metallica

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    Phone interview next week: compensation negotiable

    So I have my first phone interview for a job out west next week (not bad since I just started the job search a few weeks ago). The job ad said "compensation is negotiable." I am having second thoughts about delaying the topic of salary until the interview itself. Even a telephone interview can require a good day of research, preparation, and dress rehearsal to prepare for. Heck, I am not even sure if this is a full time job. I drafted an email to the point of contact simply asking if they could elaborate on compensation. What are your thoughts on this?
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  12. #12
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by vagaplanner View post
    All good points. It's just frustrating when I spend the time on a job application, as in one recent case, and find the salary was around $20,000/year. Even being unemployed, I'm not gonna waste my time with that nonsense. I could make that much at the local supermarket.
    Off-topic:
    Where was that job? Try to hunt down the thread about lowest planning salaries; it may need to be amended. Speaking of which, even in today's economic climate, the infamous $27K planing position in Zanesville, Ohio (MUP required) is still open; it's been a year so far.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  13. #13
    Cyburbian
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    Can you delete this post, Dan? I just realized it was not addressed to me. Thanks-
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by nrschmid View post
    ... (not bad since I just started the job search a few weeks ago). ...
    Seems like I saw your resume in my archives last weekend, and e-mails get placed there after about 6 months. So either this is a new search (after landing the gig you were after back then) or you've been ramping up for this for a while.

    JTIS.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Veloise View post
    Seems like I saw your resume in my archives last weekend, and e-mails get placed there after about 6 months. So either this is a new search (after landing the gig you were after back then) or you've been ramping up for this for a while.

    JTIS.
    This is an entirely new job search. I never heard back from that municipality. It turns out they hired someone fresh out of grad school from another state.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

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