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Thread: Resources for salary negotiation

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Resources for salary negotiation

    So tomorrow I have a face-to-face interview out West. The consulting firm is paying to fly me out. They didn't interview many people during the first round, and I was one of their top two picks. They actually extended the offer to someone else and that offer fell through, so now I'm on stage. Everyone I spoke with told me that unless I bang up tomorrow's interview, they are probably going to extend me the offer, maybe as early as Tuesday morning before I fly back.

    I am not counting my chickens before they hatch, so much as lining my ducks in a row I did a thorough research on cyburbia on salary negotiation. Can anyone recommend any good resources or books? I checked out a book from the library and am watching some videos on howcast.com. I want to delay talking about compenstation until an offer is on the table, but I also want to prepared if, and when, that happens.

    Any and all advice is greatly appreciated.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    I have no resources to recommend, but the one thing I was told - that I think was spot on - was to have them make the initial salary offer. If they ask you what you want, politely suggest that you were hoping they'd say what they were offering. You can then use that as a baseline and work your way up.

    I do think there is a salary survey by APA on planning.org

  3. #3
    Cyburbian rcgplanner's avatar
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    First of all Nick, congrats on the interview!

    Secondly, if I am moving to a new area I always use a cost of living calculator to figure out the minimum salary that would equal my current salary. Once I have that baseline, I usually add 7 to 12 percent to the number. Obviously you know this, but make sure look at the offered benefits, if a new position pays your total insurance, that may add another 50.00 to your take home pay.

    Good luck on your interview tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Cyburbian chupacabra's avatar
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    I thought you quit planning?

    Last year when I was evaluating employment scenarios I used the Salary.com personal report service and it matched up quite well with what I was initially offered in several western job markets (Tucson, Honolulu, Anchorage).

    I felt sort of lame for using it as a resource (I think it cost like $20), but it gave me fairly accurate targets to work with.

    That could all have changed not, though. I suspect that in just the past year salries have deflated a bit. Alot of it could also depend on where in the West you're interviewing. Arizona has been nailed by the recession whereas in Alaska it's barely noticable.
    You can grow ideas in the garden of your mind.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hmm.....

    Get there early and charm up the front office person to try and figure out why the first person fell off the radar or better yet, call them and if they ask your name....Mr. Brocktoon.

    Get an idea of what a similar public sector job pays, then add 30% bada thump...

    If they make an offer, it has to come with a salary, otherwise it's just not an offer of employment, it would be a request for a volunteer If they didn't publish a hiring range, it is their duty to start off the negotiation

    Once you get the job and big $, you need to host a laefest and call it NRSCHMID IS BACK!!!
    Skilled Adoxographer

  6. #6
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Work on relocation expenses and the same vacation as you earned in your last position.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    Good advice by all. Private sector is much more likely to negotiate fringes like paid days off. Make sure these added days are in addition to the paid scale, and not a place holder till you catch up to the scale.

    Good luck.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Masswich View post
    I have no resources to recommend, but the one thing I was told - that I think was spot on - was to have them make the initial salary offer. If they ask you what you want, politely suggest that you were hoping they'd say what they were offering. You can then use that as a baseline and work your way up.

    I do think there is a salary survey by APA on planning.org
    Seconded (and thirded). I'm convinced I lost a job because I stupidly answered the question on my salary expectation. I said what I wanted, which probably would have been reasonable in 2006, but in 2008 it was too high. When I finally did get a job, I was taking home about half of what I was earning at my last position. I've since gotten that raised up to about two-thirds. Just remember that they are in the driver's seat now and they may lowball you at first, but if you prove your worth once you're there you can probably negotiate a raise.

    When I was searching, I used both salary.com and the APA dalary survey. I found that APA's numbers aren't very good for private sector positions.

    BTW, in this economy a private firm paying to fly you out is a very good sign. Good luck!

  9. #9
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by rcgplanner View post
    First of all Nick, congrats on the interview!

    Secondly, if I am moving to a new area I always use a cost of living calculator to figure out the minimum salary that would equal my current salary. Once I have that baseline, I usually add 7 to 12 percent to the number. Obviously you know this, but make sure look at the offered benefits, if a new position pays your total insurance, that may add another 50.00 to your take home pay.

    Good luck on your interview tomorrow!

    We actually account for COL on the employer side to make sure the offer we extend is reasonable based on where the applicant lived previously.

    I've never negotiated with a private firm, but I imagine Mike and Chet's advice is spot-on as far as negotiating fringes. The private sector has much more flexibility.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

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