Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 219

Thread: Detroit: Then, Now, The Future

  1. #51
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,180
    Quote Originally posted by WSU MUP Student View post
    Noted Urban Planner Coming to Detroit (And it's not an article about me going downtown yesterday evening for bowling night!)


    Maybe something really will come of Detroit's downsizing plan. The Kresge Foundation has already hired a planner that will be paid by the foundation but work for the city's planning and economic development department. I can imagine others in the city (either regular citizens or folks in the city government) who might feel this is some sort of conflict of interest by having an outsider, paid for by a suburban foundation no less! gasp! working in such a capacity.
    Kressge has given quite a bit to the City of Detroit. Even though it may be located in an old farmhouse across from the K-mart HQ, its ties run deep. WSU, The Historic Museum, the DIA, the Riverwalk, and countless other civic achievements have been helped by the KF.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  2. #52
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Appleton, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,166
    So what does the Throbbing Brain™ see as the logical progression of things in and around Detroit over the next few decades?



    Mike

  3. #53
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    5,586
    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Kressge has given quite a bit to the City of Detroit. Even though it may be located in an old farmhouse across from the K-mart HQ, its ties run deep. WSU, The Historic Museum, the DIA, the Riverwalk, and countless other civic achievements have been helped by the KF.
    I don't question Kresge's motivations. As somebody who previously worked in the private foundation world, I always found the folks there to be pretty genuine... and living within a very easy bicycle commute to their HQ, I always keep an out for job openings there!

    My concern is how the esteemed members of the Detroit City Council will look at the situation or how a less informed but concerned citizen will look at it.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  4. #54
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,180
    Quote Originally posted by WSU MUP Student View post
    My concern is how the esteemed members of the Detroit City Council will look at the situation or how a less informed but concerned citizen will look at it.
    Most realize that Detroit can't afford to snub an offer from a foundation as important as Kressge. Now it may ruffle some feathers of those who will work in the Department, I hope they can see the benefit of having another person to share the workload.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered
    Apr 2008
    Location
    handle of the pan
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Now it may ruffle some feathers of those who will work in the Department, I hope they can see the benefit of having another person to share the workload.
    This brings up an interesting point. Detroit seems like an excellent, bottom-up opportunity for creative urban planning and motivated planning professionals. But what's the atmosphere like for planners there? Is there a distinct insider v. outsider perspective?

  6. #56
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327
    Some interesting pictures of properties owned by controversial Detroiter Matty Maroun. These are in today's Detroit Free Press.

    Bear

    http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/g...H&Profile=1318
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  7. #57
    Cyburbian Luca's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,150
    Ah: supply and demand.

    Any economist worth her salt would tell you that unless there is a reasonabel level of security, an area tha labors under a poor reputain/negative growth trend will find it difficult to rebound. I don't know what the newsworthy crime rate is like in 'urban' Detroit but, like NYC in soem ways, it needs for the rate to fall to well below national average for 5-10 years before the fact becomes ufficiently embedded in the collective unconscious. Easier said than done, I guess.

    Another unpalatable hsitorical lesson si that for an 'asset' that is very badly undepriced due to reptuational/historical as well as actual commercial reasons, to rebound, a relatively small group of players need to be offered an 'unfair' prospect of massive gain.
    Would someone build on (selected) urbain prairie areas if they were given, say, 20 lots for free, with no city taxes for 10 years? Yes? Do it. No? How about 100 lots? Just the construction jobs would attract secondary spin-off jobs, etc.

    On the schools front, I think the current SecEd has some fairly good ideas, though not too radical.
    Life and death of great pattern languages

  8. #58
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,180
    Here is a link with some interesting pictures and data about the current Detroit. This might shock some of you, but provides a contrarian look at what most folks think of Detroit.

    http://www.urbanophile.com/2010/04/1...de-of-detroit/
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  9. #59
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,547
    Blog entries
    3
    Requiem for Detroit. Beautifully produced, but I think the BBC special oversimplifies the reasons behind Detroit's rise and fall.



















    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  10. #60
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan (Detroit ex-pat since 2004)
    Posts
    4,762
    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Here is a link with some interesting pictures and data about the current Detroit. This might shock some of you, but provides a contrarian look at what most folks think of Detroit.

    http://www.urbanophile.com/2010/04/1...de-of-detroit/
    Wowie, thanks for sharing.

  11. #61
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,547
    Blog entries
    3
    The Detroit Declaration.

    From what I'm seeing in Buffalo, there's a new generation of young adults -- really, Generation Xers, Generation Yers, and Millennials -- who no longer see Buffalo as a cesspool to be feared. Those behind the Detroit Declaration seem to be expressing similar thoughts towards the Motor City.

    From the site:

    PREAMBLE

    Cities are the greatest expression of civilization. Great cities are filled with people who exercise their talent and creativity as the catalytic risk-takers, doers, and leaders who forge the dynamic marketplace of ideas that grow places into prosperity. We are the people who believe in cities and pledge to align our energies for the benefit of Michigan’s largest and most storied city, Detroit.

    Detroit’s place in history is secure no doubt. But if Detroit is to have any chance at a prosperous future, we must act boldly and swiftly to address the structural deficiencies that have acted over the decades to conspire against our central premise. Because in the greatest irony of Detroit’s astounding story over the last hundred years, we acknowledge that our greatest single mistake has been to disinvest in our core asset, the very city itself.

    To return to prosperity we must seize this unprecedented opportunity to remake ourselves and our city in a fundamental way. We must have the vision to not only honor Detroit on its own terms today, but work towards what Detroit can become tomorrow. We must recognize that Detroit and its surrounding communities need each other and share a common destiny. We must value and empower those who imagine a city of more rather than a city of less, even while embracing the idea that we may need to become leaner to ensure that the city thrives, not just survives.

    This vision of a greater, healthier, more vibrant, urban and livable Detroit is our single purpose, our manifest object and basis for this transformative moment. For Michigan to have a prosperous future, Detroit must be at the center of it.

    PRINCIPLES

    Building on Detroit’s assets to create opportunity and options for a prosperous city and people:

    * Be welcoming and embrace our diversity. Move beyond mere tolerance of our differences to a true commitment to openness, understanding and cooperation, and the inclusion of multiple perspectives both in our neighborhoods and at the highest decision-making realms.

    * Preserve our authenticity. Celebrate and elevate that which makes Detroit unique—local art, music, food, design, architecture, culture—to build a stronger local economy.

    * Cultivate creativity. Build an infrastructure to foster and promote emerging talent in one of Detroit’s greatest strengths, the arts: music, film, visual arts, design, and other creative industries.

    * Diversify our economy. Create a culture of opportunity and risk-taking, especially by investing in entrepreneurialism and small, micro-business.

    * Promote sustainability. Embrace the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental benefit by retooling our infrastructure with green technology, adapting vacant buildings and open spaces for new uses, and creating healthy, family-supporting jobs.

    * Enhance quality of place. Create a comprehensive vision for transit-linked, high-quality, walkable urban centers in Detroit.

    * Demand transportation alternatives. Invest in an integrated regional transportation system that links communities and provides citizens with access to the jobs, health care, and education they need.

    * Prioritize education, pre-K through 12 and beyond. Create a culture that values the wide, equitable educational attainment necessary to produce both economic opportunity and stronger citizens.

    * Elevate our universities and research institutions. Create world-class education, new technology, and medical centers to attract and retain students and faculty from around the world.

    * Enhance the value of city living. Demand public safety and services to improve the quality of life for residents.

    * Demand government accountability. Reward civic engagement with responsive, transparent, and ethical governmental decision-making.

    * Think regionally and leverage our geography. Maximize our position as an international border city and a Midwestern hub between Chicago and Toronto. Forge meaningful partnerships between Detroit and its suburbs to compete globally in the 21st century.

    PLEDGE

    We, the undersigned, endorse the principles in this document and accept the responsibility to be stewards of prosperity in our communities.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  12. #62
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,547
    Blog entries
    3
    I wonder where certain urban-oriented subcultures that normally live in pre-WWII or city neighborhoods reside in in the Detroit area; hipsters, artists, the GLBT crowd, and young adults with a preference for more active, higher density environments. In Buffalo, those subcultures can be found mostly in city neighborhoods (Allentown, Elmwood Village, Delaware District, and increasingly North Park). In Cleveland, they're split between a couple of city neighborhoods (Tremont and Ohio City) and inner ring suburbs (mainly Cleveland Heights and Lakewood).
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  13. #63
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    5,586
    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    I wonder where certain urban-oriented subcultures that normally live in pre-WWII or city neighborhoods reside in in the Detroit area; hipsters, artists, the GLBT crowd, and young adults with a preference for more active, higher density environments. In Buffalo, those subcultures can be found mostly in city neighborhoods (Allentown, Elmwood Village, Delaware District, and increasingly North Park). In Cleveland, they're split between a couple of city neighborhoods (Tremont and Ohio City) and inner ring suburbs (mainly Cleveland Heights and Lakewood).
    I think for the past decade or so, besides a couple pockets in the city, those crowds have been concentrated in a few suburbs, mainly those north of the city along the Woodward and Main Street corridors (Ferndale, Royal Oak, Berkley). I've heard talk that those folks also exist in communities "Down River" and south of the city, but I couldn't tell you the last time I ventured south of Michigan Avenue so I can neither confirm nor deny these rumors.

    Over the past couple of years, I have noticed that those remaining pockets in the city in neighborhoods like Corktown and Woodbridge seem to be growing. I don't know if the numbers will show this as well, but there seems to be a lot more activity going on in these places than at the start of the 21st century. Hamtramck, while always pretty vibrant, seems to be attracting more of a hipster crowd over the last couple of years as well.

    I always see articles and hear stories about artists and the like coming to Detroit and moving into some house they bought for $100 and it seems like only a matter of time until the city hits a critical mass of artists (visual, music, etc.) and can maybe become the Portland (Oregon) of the Midwest in the world of music. To me, it seems like a natural progression - as Seattle became too expensive for artists living and working there in the 1990s, they began migrating south to Portland. Seattle never really lost its clout because big labels like Sub Pop and Barsuk stuck around, they just had to share the rest of the scene with Portland. I like to picture the day when artists start a massive exodus out of Chicago and come to Detroit where they can live and practice their art for a fraction of the cost of doing so in the Windy City and still have plenty of places to perform live and access back to their labels in Chicago. I'll keep my fingers crossed.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  14. #64
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,180
    The Warrendale Neighborhood has several bars that cater to the LGTB community. It is located near Dearborn and is working class. Its a lot like a less yuppie version of Ferndale with way more muslims. The few gay couples that I knew that lived here however moved out a while ago and moved to Fasionable Ferndale. Don't know to what extent the community still exists here except for the bars and clubs.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  15. #65
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327
    Attached is a video clip of the opening credits for the HBO TV series Hung. The exterior scenes (and this clip) are filmed in Detroit. Gives a small perspective of the Motor City. It is a somewhat positive clip.

    Bear

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSEWYOFu6EQ
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  16. #66
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Where the Wild Things Are
    Posts
    2,242
    Anyone seen anything about the new show on ABC called "Detroit 1-8-7"? It's a crime drama that was originally supposed to be a mockumentary, entirely filmed in Detroit. Anyway, it looks interesting.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_1-8-7
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  17. #67
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan (Detroit ex-pat since 2004)
    Posts
    4,762
    Guess where most of the MSHDA (community redevelopment) new job postings are based.

    Yup.

    As a state agency, it's easy enough to find. And the fellow who posts these to LinkedIn will "connect" with anyone on there. Some of these look like pretty good gigs.

  18. #68
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Posts
    6,419
    I miss Metro Detroit. I'd move back if the job opportunity was the right one. As many problems as it has, once it's in your blood, it's hard to get it our of your system. I was in town over the weekend and every time I return I just get this feeling that it's where I'm supposed to be. West Michigan will never be home like Metro Detroit.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  19. #69
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2003
    Location
    In Wasteland of Cedar Trees
    Posts
    1,028
    I know that I'm no longer active on Cyburbia much these days. However, I totally thought of you guys when I stumbled upon this website: http://www.palladiumboots.com/exploration/detroit

    I wish I could understand what is being said in these videos, but closed captions aren't available.

    So enjoy!

  20. #70
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    Surf Jock City
    Posts
    197
    That (the Palladium video) completely changed my idea of the city. Sounds like a cool place, and I'm not joking.

    The obvious disclaimer, though - according to wikipedia, which I know isn't always accurate, over 80% of Detroit is black. Most of the people interviewed belonged to the white population of the city, which is a slim minority at 12%. The filmmaker gave us the viewpoint of a very select crowd, namely young, white artists. I wonder what the average citizen would have to say.

  21. #71
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Posts
    6,419
    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    That (the Palladium video) completely changed my idea of the city. Sounds like a cool place, and I'm not joking.

    The obvious disclaimer, though - according to wikipedia, which I know isn't always accurate, over 80% of Detroit is black. Most of the people interviewed belonged to the white population of the city, which is a slim minority at 12%. The filmmaker gave us the viewpoint of a very select crowd, namely young, white artists. I wonder what the average citizen would have to say.
    I love the city of Detroit and would love nothing more than to see it's rebirth. The Palladium videos are quite cute, but don't nearly capture the despair that most residents deal with on a daily basis. Most of the "artists" are wannabee Detroit residents...that is, they either live in the suburbs and just spend most of their time in they city, or are simply renters (NTTAWWT).

    The majority would tell you to solve racism. I'm of the firm belief that racism is the biggest reason for what has happened to Detroit. Detroit was/is the epicenter of racism. Detroit was the epicenter of the great migration of blacks that came from the south to the north during the rise of manufacturing explosion.

    Solve racism and you solve Detroit. Not an easy task. Unfortunately.

    Honestly, as much as people wish it to not be true, I truly do not see a path where Detroit becomes a viable city any time soon, without some type of revolutionary movement. And I'm not even sure what I mean by "revolutionary".
    Last edited by btrage; 20 Sep 2010 at 10:56 PM.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  22. #72
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,180
    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    That (the Palladium video) completely changed my idea of the city. Sounds like a cool place, and I'm not joking.

    The obvious disclaimer, though - according to wikipedia, which I know isn't always accurate, over 80% of Detroit is black. Most of the people interviewed belonged to the white population of the city, which is a slim minority at 12%. The filmmaker gave us the viewpoint of a very select crowd, namely young, white artists. I wonder what the average citizen would have to say.
    These do not show the average citizen. Detroit has a huge very poor population and those who are middle or upper class simply would not make a good story. Much of Detroit's black population is migrating to the suburbs. Detroit is a much smaller city than it was in the 2000 census, and it is a lot more diverse. It is still largely black though.

    A lot of what makes the City cool is not shown in these videos. It is a very narrow slice made by someone who wants to tell a story.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  23. #73
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    Surf Jock City
    Posts
    197
    The video was what it was in the sense that it represented the select few and not the many, but at least it made me want to visit. Also I should have paid attention to what year the census was; perfect example of wikiblowinit.
    Last edited by RPfresh; 20 Sep 2010 at 11:47 PM. Reason: broke a rule my bad

  24. #74
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
    Registered
    May 2008
    Location
    Surf Jock City
    Posts
    197
    I don't know if you guys are familiar with Next American City (the magazine), but their new issue is about Detroit and New Orleans as two American 'Comeback Cities.' Should be interesting, think I'll pick one up.

  25. #75
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Appleton, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,166
    Interestingly, IMHO, if or, perhaps more likely, when true high-speed rail passenger service is ever brought to Detroit and, especially, if a 'Schengen' style border agreement between Canada and the USA can be negotiated, the very BEST place that I can think of for the Detroit stop would be...

    .

    .

    .

    ...the Michigan Central station. (Imagining that place being rebuilt into a true HSR station.... )

    ---------

    That said, one thing that does very much impress me about that series of video clips is that *ALL* of that effort and initiative is coming from the private sector with ZERO governmental involvement of any kind from any level.

    I like that.



    Mike

+ Reply to thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 1
    Last post: 06 Feb 2008, 1:48 PM
  2. Replies: 19
    Last post: 10 Apr 2007, 12:44 PM
  3. Hello from Detroit!
    Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 04 Mar 2007, 8:15 PM
  4. Future planner? (was: for the future)
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 03 Jul 2006, 10:35 AM
  5. Replies: 20
    Last post: 26 Aug 2005, 9:11 AM