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Thread: The Fall Foods Thread

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    The Fall Foods Thread

    Some one made apple cake and brought it in to work. I made apple crumble last week. My mom made pumpkin pie this past weekend.

    A friend just harvested a ton of potatoes and promised me some so I'll be making potato-pepper soup.

    yum.

    Moderator note:
    Maister: I'm sorry this just HAD to have its own thread. Carry on.
    Last edited by Maister; 14 Oct 2008 at 1:42 PM.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    MMM. Maybe I'll make my Pumpkin Polenta recipe for dinner tonight. I love pumpkin muffins... pumpkin cheesecake...

    Every time I look out the window, it seems like the leaves on the trees have turned even brighter! The maple trees in our front yard are glorious with various shades of yellow and orange and light green like the color of Granny Smith apples (there's that food thing again - must be time for lunch )

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    We made the annual pilgrimage to the cider mill where we got our gallon of unpasteurized cider and dozen pumpkin donuts. We like pumpkin pie with real pumpkin (as opposed to the canned). We usually go to a nearby apple orchard and pick a bushel for applesauce, just plain eating, pies, carmel apples and the like.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    It is Fall, so it is once again time for my God Only Knows Soup to reappear. As the name implies there is no rhyme or reason to the ingredients. Whatever is in the cupboard or leftovers from the fridge are fair game. You know there will be carrots and cabbage and probably chicken, but the rest is at the whim of the cook.

    Saturday's batch was my best ever - I believe it was the two diced tomatoes and the can of tomato soup I added that did the trick. My son ate three bowls!
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Cranberry muffins in the oven right now! While I understand that cranberries can be harvested only at a certain time of year, what I don't understand is why they don't sell them frozen year round, even if for a higher price. The bag always suggests buying one for freezing. With that said, cranberries are a much awaited for fall treat. Hopefully I'll remember to stock up this year.

    I also enjoy apple cider and even though I believe it's availiable year round, I usually wait until the fall to purchase.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    I have been busy in the Fall foods department as well.

    I have already made Hungarian Sauerkraut Soup
    Last weekend was my award winning, red chili.
    I will need to make some Hungarian paprikas csirke

    Hungarian food seems to be a staple in my house in the Fall. Something hearty like this is better suited for cool weather.

    I need to get the wife to make her Pumpkin Bread though...
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Falling For Fall Foods

    Autumn is a time to fire-up the oven and enjoy some warm-yer-innards chow.....

    Chili. (A requirement. State law.)
    Chicken soup. (Thick homemade noodles, carrots, celery, onions, green pepper, fresh mushrooms....oh yeah.....chicken, too.)
    Turkey. (This Bear always does a turkey in October. Why wait for Thanksgiving? Yum! )
    Beer bread. (A Katie specialty. )
    Pumpkin pie.
    Apple crisp.
    Peach cobbler.
    Oven-baked spareribs.
    Stuffed cabbage rolls.

    I am so hungry now.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    BUN, send me the recipe for Beer Bread; it would go great with our chili!

    Here it's still in the '80's, it won't feel like our little version of fall until at least November, maybe later. I've never had "fall food" except maybe I start having more soup. We don't grow apples or anything like that down here.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Fat Cat's avatar
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    Fat Cat

    Non pasturized cider is always the best along with the rest of anything made with apples
    The same with real pumpkin
    We are having our first family outing on one of the family farms next weekend and am really looking forward to it

  10. #10
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Already made the inaugural batch of pumpkin cranberry bread a few weeks ago Up next will be the foray into hearty bean soups, baked potato soup, spicy apple cider, apple pie. Yum!
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Fall food? Turkey!

    My favorite holiday, Thanksgiving, for many reasons. Great fall food (turkey, pumkin pie, stuffing, cranberries, left-over turkey sanwiches, etc) and the idea of family and giving thanks. This year I am breaking out the turky frier... havent fried a turkey in many years.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  12. #12
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Here, I am still scrambling to deal with the tail end of the summer harvest. No frost yet, so we still have some time.

    This year, we grew tomatoes - lots and lots of tomatoes, peppers (bell, poblanos, serranos and jalapeños), chard, basil and carrots.

    For tomatoes, I have been making lots and lots of salsa and giving it away. I have two main types I am making that use various configurations of the hot peppers we grew. One is a pico de gallo, the other is a roasted salsa (I roast the tomatoes in the oven, peppers and garlic in a dry skillet). I have also been making a roasted tomatillo salsa, but I didn't grow any of those ingredients.

    This weekend, I am going to slice and dry the remaining tomatoes in the oven (ours has a "drying" function which I have never used). I also froze some roasted, drained and skinned tomatoes. Cut the tops off and put them in a pyrex dish in the oven at 425 for 25 minutes. Let cool, drain off the excess liquid, remove skins and freeze. This makes the best sauce imaginable and it thaws pretty quickly, too.

    For peppers, each types can be preserved in different ways. Poblanos can stay on the plant until everything dies. They dry out and can be reconstituted and used in various ways over the coming months. When dried, they are called "Ancho poblanos." Poblanos are a close relative of New Mexico's famous "chiles" and I use them in the same way. Red chile is made from reconstituted, on-the-plant dried peppers or by grinding the dried peppers into a powder and mixing with water and stock to make a red sauce.

    Jalapeños this year were VERY prolific (even though they are relatively small plants). I have roasted some and froze them, froze some fresh and air dried a whole bunch. This takes a few weeks and they turn read in the process. You can drop them in a stew for some spice, or crush some up for topping things like pizza or pomadoro sauce.

    I'm not sure what to do with my serranos. I have a ton of them, but they do not freeze well (they turn to mush on thawing - too fleshy, even though they are small). Gotta investigate that one.

    Two weekends ago I also made two varieties of hot sauce with a mixture of serranos, poblanos and jalapeños. I pureed the mixtures in the blender and refrigerated. I am thinking this could be a good holiday gift for some folks if I can find some good hot sauce jars. It gets better with age, too. The one variety lasts about 6 months. The other, almost forever.

    Tonight, the better half is going to harvest the remaining basil and make a huge batch of pesto to freeze. You can put it into ice cube trays, or roll it up in seran wrap as "logs."
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    yummy

    I put up about 7 gallons of sauerkraut, 5 gals. regular; 2 gals. high test with cayenne peppers It will be ready by the end of October.

    Quote:
    Originally posted by wahday View post
    Poblanos can stay on the plant until everything dies. They dry out and can be reconstituted and used in various ways over the coming months. When dried, they are called "Ancho poblanos." Poblanos are a close relative of New Mexico's famous "chiles" and I use them in the same way.
    I tried planting Poblanos this year but no luck. I got the seeds too late. Next year. I have a ton of cayenne, thai and something I don't recognize. Hot sauce is next.
    Last edited by Tom R; 15 Oct 2008 at 1:13 PM. Reason: combined messages
    WALSTIB

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    Poblanos

    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Poblanos can stay on the plant until everything dies. They dry out and can be reconstituted and used in various ways over the coming months. When dried, they are called "Ancho poblanos." Poblanos are a close relative of New Mexico's famous "chiles" and I use them in the same way.
    I tried planting Poblanos this year but no luck. I got the seeds too late. Next year. I have a ton of cayenne, thai and something I don't recognize. Hot sauce is next.
    WALSTIB

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    how could i forget candy corn and mallowcreme pumpkins? YUMMMY!!!! nothing like pure sugar to brighten up a fall day.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R View post
    I put up about 7 gallons of sauerkraut, 5 gals. regular; 2 gals. high test with cayenne peppers It will be ready by the end of October.
    Nice! I have no idea how to make sauerkraut, but I sure like to eat it! And spiced with cayenne sounds divine. Is it just a basic pickling process? My wife would be proud of you. Not only did she grow up in Akron (where her sauerkraut-loving days began, courtesy of Grandma Molly), but she continues to be a huge sauerkraut fan. She once proclaimed she thought she could survive on it alone (despite my looks of doubt). About an hour later, she got a terrible stomach ache. But that hasn't stopped her!
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    kraut

    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Nice! I have no idea how to make sauerkraut, but I sure like to eat it! And spiced with cayenne sounds divine. Is it just a basic pickling process? My wife would be proud of you. Not only did she grow up in Akron (where her sauerkraut-loving days began, courtesy of Grandma Molly), but she continues to be a huge sauerkraut fan. She once proclaimed she thought she could survive on it alone (despite my looks of doubt). About an hour later, she got a terrible stomach ache. But that hasn't stopped her!
    Making sauerkraut is very simple. (I can do it.) The hardest part is finding a crock. (No cracks) Here is a link with everything you need to know: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5342.html Remember, use UN-IODIZED SALT ONLY. For the heat I put in 5 or 6 cayenne peppers per 5 lbs. of cabbage. Now I need some home made brats or kielbasa, good mustard and beer.
    WALSTIB

  18. #18
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I make awesome baked beans from scratch - I am making some this weekend for a local public supper -

    also apple crisp (good for you, oatmeal and wheat germ, not too much sugar)

    beef-ale stew
    french onion soup, from scratch all the way to the beef broth - it's worth the effort, really

    chili
    molasses cookies

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    I get in the baking/cooking mood when fall comes. On my list: pumpkin ganache truffles, gingerbread, lamb potstickers, chili, apple pie cheesecake and lots of bread stuff like scones, muffins and big chewy loaves of bread. Luckily I bring a lot of it to my office to help negate any weight gain from having such food in the house all the time.
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
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    Stuffed acorn squash and jasmine rice.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    BUN, send me the recipe for Beer Bread; it would go great with our chili!
    I asked Katie for her "secret" recipe for the beer bread. Not such a secret, I am told. She buys the packaged item from "Tastefully Simple". I believe that there is a local woman in our area who handles the purchases, so that system probably works in your area. Attached is the linky.

    http://www.tastefullysimple.com/Cultures/en-US/

    Beer Bread Bear

    EDIT; The link doesn't appear to be working. Try just putting in tastefullysimple.com
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian View post
    I make awesome baked beans from scratch -
    beef-ale stew
    I'll swap you some home made kraut.
    WALSTIB

  23. #23
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian View post
    beef-ale stew

    Speaking of stew... I came into possession of several pounds of venison yesterday! I'm about to head to the market for the fixin's to make stew. Yum!
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  24. #24
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R View post
    I'll swap you some home made kraut.
    you're on!

  25. #25
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Timely (and yummy) piece on fall peppers! The recipes are on the right side of the article. LINK
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

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