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Thread: Another GIS issue: exporting to PDF

  1. #1
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    Another GIS issue: exporting to PDF

    I have an MXD file that I am trying to export from ArcMap into a PDF file.

    It is a map of our county and I have rotated the layers all 2.65ļ in order to make the map a bit more square otherwise, the county is a lopsided parallelogram and this way I can zoom in a little bit more when needed.

    Everything looks fine in the layout view but after exporting to PDF, the PDF file has an extra gray border around the edge of the data (I guess where the data gets cut off by the edge of the data frame if that makes any sense). I have determined that the extra gray border is somehow associated to the layer of the neighboring communities (the ones that have sort of a tan color fill) - I found this out by changing the colors of their borders in the layer symbology.

    All of the borders in the Data Frame properties have been turned off.

    If I don't rotate the layers, the gray border does not appear!

    Any thoughts on why this is occurring?

    Here is what I want to export to PDF:



    And here is what I get:
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    If you have Adobe Illustrator, try exporting it to .ai and then do PDF from there.

    Unfortunately, ArcGIS is very finicky and unpredictable at times.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Woolley's avatar
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    I am scratching my head

    Seems basic but what is the frame colour? Properties-->Frame-->No Colour
    Is this a one off map? I think you can cut the frame using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
    We architects and urban planners aren't the visible symbols of oppression, like the military or the police. We're more sophisticated, more educated, and more socially conscious. We're the soft cops.- Robert Goodman, After the Planners My Planning Forumino

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    Well, I can duplicate your problem. Youíre right that it has to do with the layer for the bordering communities being cut off by the data frame. I donít know why this creates that border during export. The only solution I found was to leave a bit of space between your data, and the data frame.

    Hereís my workaround. Select the New Rectangle/draw rectangle from the drawing toolbar. Draw a rectangle around the extent you want to show on your map. Leave a little room between the rectangle and the data frame (youíll probably want to zoom out a bit before doing this). Convert this graphic rectangle to a feature class using the Graphics to Features tool. Use your new feature class to clip the surrounding communities data. Now export your map using the clipped data. As long as thereís space between the clipped data and the data frame, you wonít get that border (as far as my testing went).

    All told, you can do this in a couple of minutes. How much that border bothers you, and whether you think itís worth it or not to get rid of it is up to you. Nice map, btw.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kpf View post
    Well, I can duplicate your problem. Youíre right that it has to do with the layer for the bordering communities being cut off by the data frame. I donít know why this creates that border during export. The only solution I found was to leave a bit of space between your data, and the data frame.

    Hereís my workaround. Select the New Rectangle/draw rectangle from the drawing toolbar. Draw a rectangle around the extent you want to show on your map. Leave a little room between the rectangle and the data frame (youíll probably want to zoom out a bit before doing this). Convert this graphic rectangle to a feature class using the Graphics to Features tool. Use your new feature class to clip the surrounding communities data. Now export your map using the clipped data. As long as thereís space between the clipped data and the data frame, you wonít get that border (as far as my testing went).

    All told, you can do this in a couple of minutes. How much that border bothers you, and whether you think itís worth it or not to get rid of it is up to you. Nice map, btw.

    Your workaround works for me but I will be using this same map template for multiple maps at all different scales throughout the geography and I think I would have to go through that process each time because of the problems involved with converting to graphics and vice versa.

    The solution I have come up with is to turn the data frame back on from "none" to another color that is distinct. In this case, I used a shade of green (the same one as the line on the bottom of the page) and then it lays on top of the unwanted gray frame of the bordering communities. And after looking at it again, I guess I don't really just want the extra roads and community borders to disappear into nothingness...

    I guess this is just one of those little ESRI flukes I will have to learn to live with.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    Ok, I see. I agree my workaround is impractical if you are using the map as a template due to the changes in scale and geographic location. I havenít really made that many maps at that scale (i.e. an entire county). The city I work for fits nicely inside of a data frame with some room to spare.

    I have made a number of maps where I have to really zoom in on a specific property, and the data (probably) gets cut off by the data frame, and I havenít noticed this problem. Iím wondering if the neatline I place around my map covers up any border ArcMap tries to add during export (like the one youíre having trouble with). Iím wondering if the neatline lays on top of the border in the same way as changing the background color does in your workaround. Iíll have to check when Iím at my work computer.

    Good luck, and yes, this is just one of those ESRI things we have to learn to live with.

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