Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Choosing a graduate school for planning [Was: Lets trade places for a sec.]

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Dec 2009
    Location
    newport beach, california
    Posts
    14

    Choosing a graduate school for planning [Was: Lets trade places for a sec.]

    I am passionate about:
    • international development and planning
    • progressive planning
    • the policy side of planning
    • I am not too worried about tuition fees or relocating
    • and I hope to get into the academic side of planning, yet consult for international projects on the side
    I have just been admitted (Masters of Urban Planning) to the following schools without aid:
    • USC
    • Cornell
    • SLO
    • Tufts
    • NYU
    • And waitlisted at UCLA

    If you were me where would you go and why ?

    I know itís a personal decision, but I feel a bit overwhelmed at the moment and would appreciate your suggestions/guidance. Thank you in advance

  2. #2
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wishing I were in Asia somewhere!
    Posts
    10,554
    Blog entries
    5
    Quote Originally posted by blaaaah View post
    I am passionate about:
    • international development and planning
    • progressive planning
    • the policy side of planning
    • I am not too worried about tuition fees or relocating
    • and I hope to get into the academic side of planning, yet consult for international projects on the side
    I have just been admitted (Masters of Urban Planning) to the following schools without aid:
    • USC
    • Cornell
    • SLO
    • Tufts
    • NYU
    • And waitlisted at UCLA

    If you were me where would you go and why ?

    I know it’s a personal decision, but I feel a bit overwhelmed at the moment and would appreciate your suggestions/guidance. Thank you in advance
    NYU. Most international development organizations are hq'd in and around NYC and would give you the best opportunity to enter that universe. It's harder to get into than you think and location is everything when it comes to getting internships and real experience. Wagner has a great program as well. Just my 2 cents.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    76
    I would also say NYU. International development is quite strong there, and I hear their program really emphasizes policy and finance (over physical planning, design, etc.).

  4. #4
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    12,745
    I would say Cornell, because your basketball team would be the best in the Ivy League...

    Okay, fine, NYU would probably be the best fit for future job prospects and a great education. But their basketball team sucks.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jul 2009
    Location
    citizen of the world
    Posts
    37
    First off, I have done a lot of research on this topic, as I have similar interests to blaaaah, although I'm leaning towards an environmental focus as well as international.

    I honestly think Cornell has one of the best international planning programs in the country. (And I'm not just saying this because I went there for undergrad). Their program is also very focused on social justice and progressive issues. While NYU has a great program (and location), they are much more practice oriented, where as Cornell is more theoretically focused. So if you want to stay in academia, perhaps pursue a PhD, etc., I would definitely suggest Cornell over NYU.

    Also, while Cornell isn't in NYC, it is only 4 hours away, and it still has many connections to the city. Summer internships that are based there are certainly possible. Beyond that, there is the CIPA (http://www.cipa.cornell.edu/) program that many CRP students collaborate with (see the Haiti article on the front page of the website), and AAP has a semester in Rome. During my semester in Rome, one of the Masters planning students was doing an internship for the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization. There is a summer CRP course in Brazil (http://www.sce.cornell.edu/ss/progra...RBC&s=Overview). Also, the Einaudi Center for International Studies (http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/) is an excellent resource. It supports interesting programs and brings many distinguished speakers from around the world.

    I think UCLA and USC are also strong alternatives. LA is very international place. I know USC has International Labs (http://www.usc.edu/schools/sppd/abou...dent_labs.html), which sound great.

    As far as policy focus instead of design focus, I hear that Cal Poly SLO is much more on the design side. While Cornell CRP is in an Architecture school rather than a Public Affairs school, it is definitely much more policy based. I've heard Cornell masters students that were interested in design complain that there were so few design courses offered through CRP.

    Sorry... don't know anything about Tufts, bust Boston is a great place to live, in my opinion.

    To help you narrow down your options, I would look at the courses offered in those schools, as well as the professors in the international specialization and their published papers or research areas. Pick a school that has courses/professors that have similar interests as your own.

    Good Luck!

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Feb 2010
    Location
    new brunswick, nj
    Posts
    64
    I'm going to chime in for Cornell as well. Their program is policy oriented, and much more progressive than Wagner's business focus (I think Hunter and Columbia provide a nice foil to NYU in that regard as well). Comparing internship opportunities/study abroad options is easily done by their websites, and I don't think you'll be disappointed by what Cornell offers and previous students have done.

    One thing I think Cornell lacks is the network of planning students NYU enjoys. NYU, Hunter, Pratt, Rutgers and Columbia all have different strengths and attract different types of students. I know students from each connect to share various conferences and opportunities. (Though I think someone pointed out Cornell isn't so far away that joining Cornell up wouldn't be impossible).

  7. #7
    Moderator note:
    ~Gedunker~
    The Student Lounge is part of the professional forums of Cyburbia: descriptive titles are required. Vague thread title edited. Carry on.
    Batter up!

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered
    Dec 2009
    Location
    newport beach, california
    Posts
    14
    Thank you for the responses so far. Seems I will have to decide between Cornell and NYU, but I am still looking forward to others chiming in. For NYU I am required to complete 300 hours before I am awarded the degree, so I will hopefully land an internship at the UN somehow and get my leg in the door via school connections. Cornell, on the other hand, has an evident international specialization with a large list of class offerings which NYU seems to lack. Thoughts? Do you know anyone with my interests at either of these schools?

    Quote Originally posted by jersbanks View post
    Wagner's business focus
    Can you elaborate on this please?

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Choosing a graduate planning program
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 18 Oct 2013, 5:05 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last post: 13 Nov 2012, 12:43 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last post: 06 Apr 2011, 10:32 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last post: 15 Sep 2009, 1:57 PM
  5. Choosing a school
    Student Commons
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 05 Apr 2005, 4:58 PM