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Thread: Are there states that require AICP?

  1. #1
    Member
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    Are there states that require AICP?

    Are there any states that legally require planners to be AICP certified in order to practice? I need some guidance in order to clear up some in-class confusion.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Plus
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    New Jersey -

    To become a certified licensed planner in New Jersey, one must submit an application meeting certain education and experience requirements, and pass both the NJ Planning Law Exam, commonly referred to as the PP Exam, and AICP Exam.
    http://www.njapa.org/certification.html
    Oddball
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally posted by JNA View post
    It says to become a certified licensed planner, not to practice as a planner.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by chocolatechip View post
    It says to become a certified licensed planner, not to practice as a planner.
    My understanding is, to practice planning in NJ, you either have to be a professional planner (who has passed both the NJPP and AICP exams and is registered with the State Board of Professional Planners) or you are a planner-in-training who works under a professional planner. If you are neither of these things, you cannot perform planning.

    According to the statute:
    The term "practice of professional planning" within the meaning and intent of this act shall mean the administration, advising, consultation or performance of professional work in the development of master plans in accordance with the provisions of chapters 27 and 55 of Title 40 of the Revised Statutes, as amended and supplemented; and other professional planning services related thereto intended primarily to guide governmental policy for the assurance of the orderly and co-ordinated development of municipal, county, regional, and metropolitan land areas, and the State or portions thereof. The work of the professional planner shall not include or supersede any of the duties of an attorney at law, a licensed professional engineer, land surveyor or registered architect of the State of New Jersey.
    While the definition of planning sounds like it is oriented towards the public sector, the statute does state that
    No corporation, firm, partnership or association shall practice or offer to practice professional planning in this State unless the person or persons in responsible charge of professional planning work shall be so licensed to practice in this State. The person or persons carrying on the actual practice of professional planning on behalf of or designated as "professional planners," with or without qualifying or characterizing words, by any such corporations, firms, partnerships, or associations, shall be licensed to practice professional planning as provided in this act.
    NJ planners even need to have a seal and mark all of their documents. Sounds like a good deal for anyone who "gets in" and becomes licensed. I wonder if we should try to get that adopted everywhere?

  5. #5
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    From my limited understanding of how NJ works, a planner must also state his qualifications before any presentations before any board or council to ensure that the planner is an "expert". The qualifications must include a NJPP.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Ahh...SEQRA View post
    From my limited understanding of how NJ works, a planner must also state his qualifications before any presentations before any board or council to ensure that the planner is an "expert". The qualifications must include a NJPP.
    That's a good rule of thumb. Having come from NJ I was fresh out of grad school and didn't have my AICP or NJPP. I operated for a county planning board and gave expert testimony but under the license of the county planning director. Everything we wrote was our signature for his name.

    //S
    JT, Principal Planner
    for
    PD, Planning Director, AICP PP

    Calling yourself a planner and "being" a planner is a fine line. But for municipal purposes, planning board or zoning board testimony and in front of elected boards you have to be a licensed professional planner or operate under the supervision of one.
    @GigCityPlanner

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