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Thread: Another list of schools

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Another list of schools

    I've got a 3.0 at a community college and am transferring in a year. The old plan was to transfer to Portland State to do their program, but now I'm thinking staying in the bay area would be nice. How's the program at SF State? And mentioning Berkeley would be a joke, right?

    I am kind of picky about where I live, and have no interest in southern California. I'll admit I've done no research but If there are any schools that you can think of in Chicago or NYC that offer good programs and might accept me, let me know. Thanks

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    I've got a 3.0 at a community college and am transferring in a year. The old plan was to transfer to Portland State to do their program, but now I'm thinking staying in the bay area would be nice. How's the program at SF State? And mentioning Berkeley would be a joke, right?

    I am kind of picky about where I live, and have no interest in southern California. I'll admit I've done no research but If there are any schools that you can think of in Chicago or NYC that offer good programs and might accept me, let me know. Thanks
    what do you ultimately want to do with your degree. It kills me when people choose a program based on a location (which is fine) but lack the due dilgience to figure out what the heck they want to do when all i said and done.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    CPSURaf - My dream is to work for and eventually own an international urban planning consulting firm that plays doctor on bad areas and helps new cities form in constructive ways. Seeing as that won't happen anytime soon I'd be down to work for a city but in a developing country, maybe in China or Latin America. Working in the States has no appeal for me at all, unless it was with a consulting firm. Does that answer your question?

    And I agree with your second point. Sadly I haven't really considered school as anything but getting a degree, and looking at it in terms of preparing me to work abroad or as a consultant would be more constructive.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    CPSURaf - My dream is to work for and eventually own an international urban planning consulting firm that plays doctor on bad areas and helps new cities form in constructive ways. Seeing as that won't happen anytime soon I'd be down to work for a city but in a developing country, maybe in China or Latin America. Working in the States has no appeal for me at all, unless it was with a consulting firm. Does that answer your question?

    And I agree with your second point. Sadly I haven't really considered school as anything but getting a degree, and looking at it in terms of preparing me to work abroad or as a consultant would be more constructive.
    If you don't want to work in the states, then why don't you look into planning programs in other countries? Going to a foreign college is going to be the best (and easiest) way to be able to legally work, or practice planning, in those places. It will also provide the best segway into international planning--what's better than immersion? The only thing is, financial aid is way tough when you are a foreign student.

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by chocolatechip View post
    If you don't want to work in the states, then why don't you look into planning programs in other countries?
    I was thinking that studying in the North America/England/Australia regions would be the way to go as they teach in English and that's what I want to learn in. In another thread HKU is mentioned as the best urban planning school in Asia (and they teach in English), but they don't appear to have an undergrad urban planning program.

    Given that, are there English-language programs here or abroad that would be geared towards urban planning in developing countries that anyone can think of?

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    You should consider the University of Auckland.

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Auckland sounds cool; getting a minor in Latin American Studies is something I could see doing. I also took CPSUraf's advice and looked for a school geared toward international urban planning, and I found one in New York - NYU Wagner. Anyone know how easy it might be to get in with general ed taken care of (in the California Community College system) and a 3.0?

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    Cyburbian kalimotxo's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    Auckland sounds cool; getting a minor in Latin American Studies is something I could see doing. I also took CPSUraf's advice and looked for a school geared toward international urban planning, and I found one in New York - NYU Wagner. Anyone know how easy it might be to get in with general ed taken care of (in the California Community College system) and a 3.0?
    Your chances at NYU admission are slim to naught. NYU is incredibly selective and really expensive. Sorry, but you're probably going to have to set your sights a little lower with that kind of GPA. Why not check out some state schools? IMO, there are many public schools that are a better value than expensive private schools - especially when it comes to undergrad degrees.
    Process and dismissal. Shelter and location. Everybody wants somewhere.

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    There are good state schools, but I haven't found any that focus on international planning and I'd rather major in that than anything else. I was stoked because I read that Wagner accepts half of its applicants, but that did seem too good to be true. If NYU's a no go I guess I'm back to square one.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian kalimotxo's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    There are good state schools, but I haven't found any that focus on international planning and I'd rather major in that than anything else. I was stoked because I read that Wagner accepts half of its applicants, but that did seem too good to be true. If NYU's a no go I guess I'm back to square one.
    Wagner probably does accept 50% or more of its applicants for its graduate program (as do the vast majority of other MUP programs) but there is pretty much no chance of getting into NYU undergrad with a 3.0 from community college. Your options for international planning are going to be much greater in graduate programs. You may be better off finishing your bachelors degree at an inexpensive state school. Boost your GPA a bit and then look into grad programs that would better fit your academic needs.
    Process and dismissal. Shelter and location. Everybody wants somewhere.

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    @kalimotxo - I think that you're dead on and that that's the path I'll end up taking, but I'm still holding out hope that somewhere there's a school with an undergrad international lean that would take me. Haven't found one yet, but I'm emailing all kinds of people asking. Thanks for your input

  12. #12
    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    @kalimotxo - I think that you're dead on and that that's the path I'll end up taking, but I'm still holding out hope that somewhere there's a school with an undergrad international lean that would take me. Haven't found one yet, but I'm emailing all kinds of people asking. Thanks for your input
    A key here might be to look for a school with a very strong international planning emphasis, knowing that that might seep down to the undergrad level through special classes, research assistantships, etc.

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    Hey there - I think I share some of your objectives in terms of international consulting and working in developing regions. Also, because I come from a "developing region" I know a little of how the industry employs/seeks consultants.

    First off, I strongly disagree that you have to leave the USA and study abroad, simply because you want to work outside your home country.

    First of all, in which "international" country, would you be able to study which would allow you to work in all other international countries??

    Unless you know exactly where you want to work for the rest of your life, then I would not recommend going abroad and racking up debt.

    Also, American degrees are globally accepted. And if you can work hard to end up in an internationally respected institution then you're very employable to international firms, parastatals (or govts), NGOs etc...

    However if you want to go abroad just for the experience of living and studying away from home then go for it! JUst make sure you end up in an internationally respected institution, one that firms from Jakarta to Lisbon and back will be able to appreciate!

    Bartlett has a great International planning focus. ACtually, most of the UK universities are a lot more globally minded than the US ones (generally speaking)
    Australian institutions have some great programs that offer insight to the Asian Pacific region (a very exciting are of the world to work)... this is facilitated by their proximity to the subcontinent. Many firms recruiting in the region will hold good Australian Unis in high esteem

    Hope this helps

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    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    afrubranist - thanks for validating some of my ideas. I was pretty sure that getting a solid degree in a US school would put me in good footing for an international enterprise, and you're right, I don't feel like spending a ridiculous amount of money on a foreign school. I do love to travel, but I'd rather do it for a living in the future than go to school abroad right now, you know?

    I'm also thinking about doing a UN-Habitat internship one of these summers, and hopefully that would help my international prospects. Has anyone done this, and if so how did it go?

    Thanks everyone for responding so far.

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    RP,
    I don't know what your chances are to raise your GPA, but have you thought about getting an undergrad degree in international business (and trying your best to spin economics and development into it) and then go for a graduate degree in planning? That way your GPA for transfering into a general degree program like "business" can help you transfer and give you an end game into planning with a grad degree. Just a thought.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

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