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Thread: Do we really need to keep extending unemployment benefits indefinetely?

  1. #51
    Cyburbian
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    I have a feeling the unemployment extensions are done after November, with the GOP quite possibly taking the House. Even if Dems hold on, the GOP should be able to filibuster any extension since they'll add 5-6 Senators.

    Ending the extensions will be bad economically, since our economic problem is lack of demand and they're removing money people will spend ASAP. These people will have a very difficult time finding work since there's 1 job opening per every 5 unemployed.

    NRS I respect your work ethic, but think you may have a different perspective if you had under 5 years of planning experience.

  2. #52
    Cyburbian
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    NRS I respect your work ethic, but think you may have a different perspective if you had under 5 years of planning experience.

    I disagree, I don't think my work ethic would change: that's ingrained in me. However, the methods of reaching that desired result (i.e. full time employment, upward mobility) might be slightly different than what I did a few years ago.

    If there is 1 job opening for every 5 unemployed, than you have to change your strategy around. As a planner, especially growing up in Chicagoland where there is ALWAYS hypercompetition, I grew up competing for the smallest internship to an entry-level job, etc. I still remember competing for summer college internships during the boom where I had to beat out 50-60 applicants. So when I hear that number has now increased to 200-300, I shrug it off and change my battle plan.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
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  3. #53
    Cyburbian
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    NRS,

    Am just saying if you had fewer years of experience, your resume wouldn't look as good, which would make it more difficult to get hired. However, I guess those who entered the field after 2005 should have been more aware of the disaster ahead.

  4. #54
    Cyburbian
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    Am just saying if you had fewer years of experience, your resume wouldn't look as good, which would make it more difficult to get hired.

    You are talking about two different things. In your previous post you were asking if my perspective on unemployment extensions would be different if I were younger. Now you are asking me about resumes and "lack of experience."

    I am interpreting this as we slightly older folks had it easier than the fresh crop of students coming out of school. I partly agree with you. Each year, regardless of the economy, it becomes harder and harder for people to break into planning (number of planning jobs never equals the growing the number of job seekers). I graduated college in 2003 when the MUP was growing as the standard degree for entry-level planning jobs. Several of my supervisors graduated in the late 90s and early 2000s when it was still easier to get into planning with a variety of college diplomas (planning, geography, architecture, economics) and still work their way up the corporate ladder.

    Yes I graduated during a boom time and yes I earned several interviews the year after college, but it was a very bumpy road, partly because I only had a BUP and refused to get a duplicate degree. It took me a good 18 months after I graduated with a BUP to land my first planning job in a firm in 2005. Throughout 2004-2005 I was juggling a couple of internships (paid and unpaid), tweaking the portfolio (although it was PDF at the time now it's Flash), researching jobs, tailoring job applications, etc. I had to pound the pavement just like almost everyone else. I had done that throughout college as well. So when I was laid off in May 2009, I just went back to what I had always done, made some slight changes, and got to work looking for a full time job.

    Does my resume looks better with 5 more years of full time experience? Well, somewhat. However, I have had a dense 2 page resume since I was 22. I earned 6 internships in college/post college so I had more to draw from (along with a variety of college projects) than my classmates. The only differencd is today I can add and subtract more when needed. However, I still faced stif competition even in boom times. In October 2004, I beat about 300 applicants for a GIS volunteer job with a forest preserve district designing trail signage. So again, there is always a ton of people clamoring for a planning internship or job, especially in a large metro area. I don't think this started in the recession. I had already encountered this a decade before.

    However, I guess those who entered the field after 2005 should have been more aware of the disaster ahead.

    Yep. I agree 200%. The planning profession is kept gainfully employed when people are building and expanding. We can't keep building and expanding forever and ever. Eventually the supply exceeds the demand and when we don't have enough assets and liquidity it becomes harder to adjust. I have read 1-2 newspapers a day since my early teens and the media was pointing out this bubble as early as 2003-2004, although they severely underestimated the magnitude of this mess. Back then, I thought we were in for terrible times. Chicago was hit in early 2007, although California, Nevada, Florida, and other states witnessed this sooner.

    Yes, I was fortunate to graduate at a time when there were more jobs. I don't deny that. However, it was still an uphill climb. I made plenty of mistakes myself in college, did a 180, and cleaned up my act before I eearned my diploma, and I hope I never repeat those mistakes again.
    Last edited by nrschmid; 22 Aug 2010 at 2:48 PM.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  5. #55
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Although I disagree with NRS on the need for unemployment benefit extensions, I do agree that it is no easier for people with experience. While there are fewer entry level jobs, there are also fewer senior level jobs. Places that are hiring senior planners are also looking to reduce salary costs, and sometimes benefits as well. As a result, it is nearly impossible to return to an existing salary level, a problem further complicated by the fact that those older workers are also likely to have a spouse and a home. (Does the spouse quit a job to relocate? Do you lose tens of thousands in equity to leave behind your home?) If an experienced planner applies for a lower level position, they are likely to be screened out as over-qualified.
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