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Thread: The Most Horrible Future

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    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    The Most Horrible Future

    Went to a presentation by our MPO today (yawn), and I was wondering what all the watered-down TODs and New Urban stuff will look like in the distant future. Not 20-40 years but the Sci-Fi future you know? That made me wonder which future depicted in Sci-Fi is really the most horrific...Is it the calm, beige, cannabilistic future of Soilent Green? Is it the post-apocalyptic Planet of the Apes? Is it the uber-urban Blade Runner future? Which one is the most horrifying and why?
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    The movie 'Brazilia' painted the ugliest picture...because in many ways it tracked our current trajectory most accurately.

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    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    I would go with the version protrayed in the movie "Idiocracy". Seems fairly realistic, too.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Oh Yeah!

    Quote Originally posted by Rygor View post
    I would go with the version protrayed in the movie "Idiocracy". Seems fairly realistic, too.
    Buildings listing badly and rubber banded together.....interstates that just end.....Carl's Junior in charge of social services.....Rygor has the right idea

    Maister- I think you mean the movie Brazil?
    Last edited by The One; 29 Jul 2010 at 10:40 AM.
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

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    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    "A Clockwork Orange" - Just deeply disturbing, DoD can probably elaborate on dystopian futures better than I can.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

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    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Well I think it's same to say that the future will NOT be similar to Looking Backward, nor will it be the future of Atlas Shrugged. Perhaps it will be a little more similar to Brave New World?
    Children in the back seat can cause accidents - and vice versa.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    The Road. What else could possibly compete? Only Children of Men comes close.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One View post
    Maister- I think you mean the movie Brazil?
    Yeah, that was the title.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by imaplanner View post
    Perhaps it will be a little more similar to Brave New World?
    That gets my vote, only with certain changes in the consumerism (environmentally conscious consumerism) will and caste system portrayed (no castes - stations of life of ones own choosing, often at the prodding of the world state based on merit and natural gifts). Other things, like recreational sex, drug use, population controls, reservations for nonconformists, etc., all as official policies/practices of a unified government to control culture, are more realistic than the world of Idiocracy. Of course, my political/philosophical bent probably influences my vision of a horrible future considerably (same with Idiocracy folks).

    I could also see something like The Matrix happening.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I agree - Brazil was the creepiest and closest - love that movie just the same

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    Wall - E. Where in 'Buy N Large' is a stand-in for the planning world's evil big box nemesis.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    "A Clockwork Orange" - Just deeply disturbing, DoD can probably elaborate on dystopian futures better than I can.
    What happens when Dystopia happens to be nowhere NEAR as bad as doomsayers predict, and more miserable than the Utopians want? In other words, "the Children of Men, The Road, Alas Babylon, Logan's Run, etc." are not going to happen.

    Modern day Buenos Aires is not a lot different than Blade Runner. A Clockwork Orange could have happened in Detroit, Children of Men could be happening in Kansas.

    Mass disease WILL hit at some point. Somebody WILL use the bomb again. War will ravage the land. Solar flares and astroids will cause problems.

    Think of Dystopia and Utopia as the same thing. They both have a privileged group, and the defined bad. Which is which depends on the view of how a person is/not privileged. In a sense, this is an age old predicament of mankind.

    The "rule by dumb people" of Idiocracy is no more sustainable than the pretense of Anarchist views. Both of which are less sustainable than either monarchies or dictatorships. I would rate monarchies as more successful than dictatorships because succession lines are more clear. Democracies are difficult to maintain.

    Over the last 10k years, we have managed to overcome every obstacle firmly planted in our way by Robert Maulthus (The original man of doomsday). This should not occur any less in the next coming 1,000 years. The key is that we solve one issue and more pop up. That's the way it works.

    We will switch to a more sustainable energy future. There is no choice. Net benifit.
    We will have a planet with 9-10 billion people. Net non-benifit
    We can feed that many. If we can feed them we can clothe them. Doing so will require the creation of jobs. We ALL can have a good quality of life. We just all will not have flying cars and massive houses and boatloads of cash.
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  13. #13
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    You mean it isn't right now?
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  14. #14
    As a recovering sci-fi buff, I'm inclined toward a Solyent Green type of future. DoD bring up many good points and human society has proved to be both resourceful and flexible. The world I grew up in, the cusp of the computer age, is different than todays world. In some ways better, in some ways worse. Society has changed over the several thousand years.

    However, there is only x-amount of non renewable resources, oil, rare mineral. etc. We have only x amount of useable land. This will catch up with us. I also see a world that has turned inward, computers, gaming, etc will continue erode our ability to function together. Our leaders will learn to capitialize on this and keep us distracted. Just my 2-cents worth.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TexanOkie View post
    I could also see something like The Matrix happening.
    Some look upon the storyline as being allegorical.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
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    Off-topic:
    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Some look upon the storyline as being allegorical.
    Having been raised amongst the evangelical Christian contingent of our culture, including attending a Christian preparatory school when the films were being released, I am well aware (perhaps too aware) of the allegorical claims of the Matrix storyline, both within and without Christian theological/philosophical traditions. I lean more towards the without (as an interpretation of the writers' aim), but still think it's overplayed.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Being ruled by a giant nose.


  18. #18
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner View post
    .....The world I grew up in, the cusp of the computer age, is different than todays world. In some ways better, in some ways worse. Society has changed over the several thousand years.

    However, there is only x-amount of non renewable resources, oil, rare mineral. etc. We have only x amount of useable land. This will catch up with us. I also see a world that has turned inward, computers, gaming, etc will continue erode our ability to function together. Our leaders will learn to capitialize on this and keep us distracted. Just my 2-cents worth.
    Has anyone ever thought about how they might cope after the numerous doomsday scenarios? In all of my days reading sci-fi, I have only encountered a single story that asks what would happen if tragic events brought people closer?

    Here is an analogue of sorts. After the US embargoed Cuba, the nation went through an agricultural panic and tough times. It did not collapse. People planted rooftop gardens and planted produce in their yards. There was abundant vegetables like tomatoes and such things to go around.

    Think of how much open space there is in the average American lawn. Tough times but not doomsday.

    Check out the TV series "Jericho". Many issues but not doomsday.

    Domesday is fun to think about because you get to let your mind wander and play what if.

    It's not hard to build most of what you need with very limited tools. Most tools can be improvised easily. Even with modern technology, there are only technological innovations for 5 types of machining (modern marvels, tools?). Want to know your basic required tool load out you NEED? Think pioneers and what they could carry on a Conestoga wagon.

    Think of the material available to work with in an area hit with massive depopulation (assuming you weren't one of them). Weapons grade sword blanks exist as leaf springs in vehicles along with 12 volt car batteries and alternators for them. Most of your home electronics/devices have been metered down to work at 12 volts. abandoned crops will return next year.

    Furthermore, we as a species are group oriented. Most of our disaster stories flow along the lines of an individual or a family grouping in size. Take for instance, the Discover show "The Colony". The group has a lot of knowledge. That know how could be traded for goods and services to the "hooligans" that plague them. Not long after that, a small workable society develops.

    Times of social instability only last so long before a new equilibrium takes place. The french revolution for instance, or the black plague years, or the fall of the western roman empire. The Huns were an exciting but fleeting footnote.

    A real "tribe" numbers from about 50 to 150 individuals. 3 to about 20 represents a family grouping.
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Science fiction seems to predict either utopias or dystopias, with little in between. In reality, life and society continue on as in the past, with gradual changes and tweaks. The sanitized, streamlined jet age anticipated in the 1950s never happened, nor did the societal breakdown many in the 1960s and 1970s expected for the future. In my opinion, there was a much greater change in society and culture between 1950 and 1980 than 1980 and the present. 2010 is just 1980 with less obnoxious hairstyles, worse music, better gadgets, and less crime.

    If any science fiction dystopia is possible, I'd say it would be that of Gattaca.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker View post
    Wall - E. Where in 'Buy N Large' is a stand-in for the planning world's evil big box nemesis.
    oh yeah, good call

    I just want to be Captain Janeway in my next life

  21. #21
    Cyburbian MazerRackham's avatar
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    Unfortunately, I don't think the Avatar future is far from where we are. That is the endless pursuit of natural resources by all-powerful corporations. (Not big blue aliens). I imagine more than one has their eye on the recently discovered Afghanistan resources.
    "The devil bought the key to Branson. Drives a backhoe and wears a gold chain." --- Jay Farrar from the song "Barstow"

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    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    This thread reminded me of an old Twilight Zone episode. The lead character worked in a bank but spent all his time reading. He loved to read and was in the process of losing his job when nuclear war ravaged the planet. When he crawled out of the rubble he was at first distraught......but the wreckage he was thrown into was the public library. And most of the books were protected by walls that had collapsed inward. He was in "heaven".

    As he settled down to start reading he dropped his glasses. Because he was nearly-blind without his glasses he frantically search in the rubble for them. He found them.....with his foot.

    Keerunch!

    A most horrible future.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  23. #23
    Cyburbian jswanek's avatar
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    .

    I believe everything depends on whether or not there will be a committment to the end of POVs (personally owned vehicles) after a certain time certain - say 2040. IF this discussion begins nationally in a few years (it's already begun in places like Manhattan and San Fran), and there is a national "Clean Cities Act" in 2025, everything changes. THEN the future looks like the most recent Star Trek movie, with everyone living in 40 story complexes surrounded by farmland and connected by GOVs.

    .

  24. #24
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Unfortunately, as long as there have been humans with any sorts of brainpower, they have always had 'personal vehicles' of some sort, only their forms have changed over time. Carts, horses, carriages, bicycles, automobiles, etc. I see nothing that will change that fact for as long as humans continue to exist.

    Mike

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    Cyburbian rcgplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One View post
    Buildings listing badly and rubber banded together.....interstates that just end.....Carl's Junior in charge of social services.....Rygor has the right idea
    I will second this idea. One of my co-workers was saying a few weeks ago when we were talking about the oil spill how she feels like she is living in Idiocracy with some of the strange ideas BP had like the "junk shot".

    "It's got electrolytes... it's what plants crave."

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