Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Building previously located where the John Hancock building is presently in Boston

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Aug 2010
    Location
    boston,ma
    Posts
    1

    Building previously located where the John Hancock building is presently in Boston

    does anybody know what building was originally located on the current john hancock tower location at 200 clarendon st.boston? i am actually interested in any buildings that were located there from 1910 through 1970. thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    9,845
    Welcome to Cyburbia from the Great State of Ohio! This is the introduce yourself forum. You will garner more responses if you put your question in the appropriate forum like Design, Space, and Place.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  3. #3
    Moderator note:
    ~Gedunker

    Greetings. As noted by Hink_Planner, you'll likely get better responses to your query here in the Design, Space, and Place forum. Thread moved and title edited. Carry on.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Gone to a better place (in my mind)
    Posts
    407
    I have a couple of books at home that may show what was there. I'm not sure how much detail they go into (Mapping Boston is one).

    You can also look for Sanborn maps. Some old ones are online at the Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/rr/geogmap/sanbor...=Massachusetts Sanborn maps are a great resource.

    One thing I'm not sure about is whether the "new" Hancock tower was built on filled-in areas of Back Bay or not. That would at least make it easier to track the history of what was there.

    EDIT: OK, you got me interested. You can play around with historic map layers at the BRA's mapping web site:

    http://www.mapjunction.com/bra/

    Just zoom in to 200 Clarendon Street, click on the button that says "2005 Mass Color Ortho" and choose whatever base layer image you want. Pretty cool stuff.

    EDIT AGAIN!

    Obviously, I am bored and would rather do your work than mine. So, your quest is complete:

    http://www.mapjunction.com/places/Op...=14848&p=28352

    Click on this link to see the 1938 Bromley map (forgot that Boston likes Bromley) of the Hancock site with the current Hancock Tower footprint superimposed. Looks like there were some hotels there.
    Last edited by JimPlans; 27 Aug 2010 at 12:17 PM. Reason: New link and new link again

  5. #5
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Gone to a better place (in my mind)
    Posts
    407
    FYI: I checked in "Built in Boston" and found that the Hotel Westminster was designed by Henry C. Cregier of Chicago, built in 1897, and was actually an apartment building of "French Flats." Like the Westminster, the Hotel Ludlow (also not a hotel, but apartments) was known in the 1890's as a place where fashionable people on the Social Register lived. When built, these were places where people of high social standing lived. By the 1960's, probably not so much.

    Also, if you go back to 1917 with the Bromley maps (from the Boston Public LIbrary) than you wills ee that MIT used to occupy some of that space, too. Forgot that MIT used to be in Boston.

    http://www.mapjunction.com/places/Op...=14848&p=28473
    Last edited by JimPlans; 27 Aug 2010 at 12:49 PM.

  6. #6
    The Hancock is definitely on filled land. So there would have been nothing there prior to the filing in of the Back Bay.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Gone to a better place (in my mind)
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    The Hancock is definitely on filled land. So there would have been nothing there prior to the filing in of the Back Bay.
    It's amazing that all of that area is fill. I suppose when you build something as big as the Hancock Tower you go down to bedrock, but so many buildings in that area are sitting on wooden pilings, essentially floating in the muck. An 1851 map shows just how much of that area was filled.

    http://www.mapjunction.com/places/Op...?t=14849&p=827

    This mapping website from the BRA is great. Too bad Maryland doesn't have anything like it. I could play with this all day.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 7
    Last post: 05 Aug 2005, 1:11 PM
  2. new building type
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 08 Jan 2004, 1:34 PM
  3. Name that building.
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 9
    Last post: 23 Oct 2003, 11:55 AM
  4. Building a blog
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 17 Mar 2003, 2:53 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last post: 25 Jul 2000, 1:51 AM