Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Ball State goes geothermal

  1. #1
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    9,636

    Ball State goes geothermal

    Ball State University (many locals alma mater) has gone green. And they are doing it with geothermal, which is the future. If anyone is familiar - they removed the parking lot between Botsford / Swinford and Johnson (the Honors Dorms) and have put geothermal under it. They are in the process of putting the parking lots back on top of it.

    Not only does this make Ball State look good, but the article focuses on Purdue and how they are still using coal. Double whammy!

    http://www.nuvo.net/indianapolis/a-t...nt?oid=1598998

    Not every state institution seems so beholden to coal. As Purdue looks to pursue further coal-burning operations, Ball State has sought a greener alternative to fossil fuels. Indeed, its efforts to make the switch to geothermal energy have placed it at the vanguard of campuses nationwide.

    Yet, when Ball State first began looking at its options for replacing its boilers four to five years ago, engineers originally looked at the same so-called "clean coal" upgrades Purdue is pursuing now. "At the time, that's what was available," explained Jim Lowe, director of engineering, construction, and operations for Ball State.

    Original estimates for the reduced-emissions coal-based upgrade put the project at about $40 million. Ball State, being a state-funded university, submitted its request for appropriations to the state, and the state agreed.

    But as time progressed, it became clear that other universities were beginning to explore other, more eco-friendly alternatives. The University of Iowa, for example, had begun mixing biomass in with its coal as early as 2001, eventually converting one of its coal-fired boilers to burn oat hulls from the Quaker Oats facility in nearby Cedar Rapids.The University of Missouri had begun integrating biomass into its coal-burners– from wood chips to corn stover – in 1995. (Missouri announced recently it would have an all-biomass boiler online to replace one of its coal-fired boilers by 2012.) Ball State considered doing likewise, starting with a mix of fuels, and moving toward full alternative fuel use as time wore on.

    As importantly, perhaps, the price tag went up. What had originally looked like a roughly $40 million project for newer, more flexible coal boilers, shot up to about $65 million once all kinds of new emission control equipment were taken into consideration. Suddenly the financial incentives of a coal-based approach were a lot less significant when compared to other options – like geothermal.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  2. #2
    Member blevy's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2010
    Location
    4 Corners
    Posts
    22
    Hooray for ground source heat pumps! Check out the Oregon Institute of Technology and Prof. John Lund for all kinds of campus uses of geothermal (snow melt, district heating, cooling, greenhouse crop production, etc).

  3. #3
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    7,039

    Cool.....

    So now in addition to a LOT OF HOT AIR, they will also have a LOT OF HOT WATER?

    The One ducks and runs from Ball State Grad's
    Skilled Adoxographer

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Hello from Ball State!
    Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 20 Nov 2013, 9:23 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last post: 01 Apr 2010, 10:34 PM
  3. Ball State MURP
    Student Commons
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 11 Feb 2010, 4:11 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last post: 04 Apr 2007, 11:37 AM
  5. CAP Asia (Ball State)
    Student Commons
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 22 Feb 2006, 5:53 PM