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Thread: May we contact your current supervisor?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Planderella's avatar
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    May we contact your current supervisor?

    That's a pretty tough question to answer. While I know that my employer will vouch for my work, I certainly don't want them to know that I'm on the hunt. What do you check, yes or no?
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  2. #2
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    I would check "No."

    I'm sure they are used to seeing that response from applicants.
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    I would say "No".

  4. #4
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    Ditto, "no" is the only smart course of action unless they've already been made aware that you're looking for something, and this isn't out of the question if you've been there for a while and have a good relationship in which your boss has been a mentor to you and wants you to succeed in your career.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian azmodela's avatar
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    On the other hand...

    As a hiring agent, if I see "no" checked, I have to wonder what you're hiding.

    If I see "yes" checked, I know you have nothing to hide, and besides, I'm not calling or doing any background reference checks until I'm ready to make an offer. At that point, both parties know an offer is looming and will make sure past employers and references know.

    Besides, everyone has looked for a job while still employed and agonized over that choice, even the person doing the hiring, so they'll understand if you check yes, but ask that they refrain from contacting them until an offer is pending.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally posted by azmodela View post
    On the other hand...

    As a hiring agent, if I see "no" checked, I have to wonder what you're hiding.

    If I see "yes" checked, I know you have nothing to hide, and besides, I'm not calling or doing any background reference checks until I'm ready to make an offer. At that point, both parties know an offer is looming and will make sure past employers and references know.

    Besides, everyone has looked for a job while still employed and agonized over that choice, even the person doing the hiring, so they'll understand if you check yes, but ask that they refrain from contacting them until an offer is pending.
    Really? That makes you "have to wonder" what s/he's hiding? You must love your job if a "no" on that portion of the application gets you tingling with such excitement. So your inclination is to expect the worst and think s/he has something to hide, instead of them just not wanting you to divulge to the current employer of their job application. I bet you glean a lot of poor applicants out with such a logically sound screening, especially since you don't couple it with an inquiry about why they said no.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by azmodela View post
    On the other hand...

    As a hiring agent, if I see "no" checked, I have to wonder what you're hiding.

    If I see "yes" checked, I know you have nothing to hide, and besides, I'm not calling or doing any background reference checks until I'm ready to make an offer. At that point, both parties know an offer is looming and will make sure past employers and references know.

    Besides, everyone has looked for a job while still employed and agonized over that choice, even the person doing the hiring, so they'll understand if you check yes, but ask that they refrain from contacting them until an offer is pending.
    Isn't that usually why applications provide a space to give a reason why you would check 'No'. I would have to think they would understand if you didn't want your current employer knowing that you were sniffing around someplace else. Unless, you have a very friendly, open relationship with your supervisor/employer.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
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    I would check "no" and as someone who regularly hires planners (no openings at this time) the fact that someone has checked "no" does not matter to me. I understand there are many reasons for leaving a job, and that an applicant may not want to jeopardize his or her existing job while looking for another.

  9. #9
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    I would also check no--no phone calls until a potential offer!

  10. #10
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    Nice discussion

    I have wondered about that myself, and reading the responses really fleshes out my own thoughts on this. Now, I would say, not no, but h-e-double hockey sticks no!

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    I have a slightly different angle. If the position you are in is stable and either entry level or low/mid level and you are in good standing with your boss/supervisor AND they are a mentor type person for you or they know you won't be around forever - I would say yes tell your boss/supervisor that you are looking, and for the good reasons, and check that box.

    So, to sum that up, if you are in good standing in a stable job with a good relationship with your superiors then yes, if it means moving up to the next level and not because you are unhappy at your current position, then no reason to leave them out of the loop.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Obvious answer is NO

    NO.
    Only contact my current employer in the event an offer for employment is pending.

    NOTE: A person that holds a no answer to this question against a prospective employee is the same person that would hold a call from a prospective employer against a current employee!!

    Obviously they want a new job and would rather not be retaliated against by some douche bag boss.
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  13. #13
    Cyburbian Joe Iliff's avatar
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    I don't have a problem with a job applicant who selects, "No" in response to that question. I think it would be fair to ask them why they responded that way. Does their current employer not know they are hunting? Do they want the courtesy of telling them they've applied elsewhere before a potential employer does? Is there a personality conflict with the current supervisor that concerns them, rather than a quality of work issue? Is it that the supervisor they've spent the most time reporting to just left working there, and the new person they report to now doesn't know them that well?

    I've been in some of those situations where a call to my current employer without an understanding of the situation, might have caused more confusion for them, rather than less.
    JOE ILIFF
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  14. #14
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    This caused me to lose a job many, many years ago. I did not check the box, at least that I recall, but someone contacted my current employer. I never received an offer, but my employer did make an excuse to let me go.
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