Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 41

Thread: How much do you pay in property taxes?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian stroskey's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2008
    Location
    the delta
    Posts
    1,203

    How much do you pay in property taxes?

    How much do you pay in property taxes? I think those of us in the planning profession appreciate property taxes more than regular folks. For that matter, how much are you average utility bills?

    My taxes are about $2,600/year for 1/4 acre residential land.
    Utility bill (electric/gas) about $140/month
    Water/Sewer about $25/month
    I burned down the church to atone for my transgressions.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Upper left edge
    Posts
    3,849
    Property taxes about $2,500 for 5,000 sf lot and 1,800 sf house
    Electric about $80/mo (more in winter when it's harder to keep the hot tub heated)
    Gas about $85/mo (even monthly payment plan: it would be lower in the summer and higher in the winter)
    Water/sewer about $75/mo (we pay twice the in-city rate since we are outside the city)

    We are soon to be annexed, so water/sewer will go down by half, and property taxes will go up by about 40%.

    Let's see, $450 off of water/sewer bill. $1,000 added to property tax, of which Uncle Sam pays about 25% ($250) and Oregon pays 9% ($90) through income tax write-off. Net cost of annexation will be about $210/yr.

  3. #3
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 1998
    Location
    On the Mother River
    Posts
    4,573
    I pay $1,978 for taxes for my house. Electric is $250, and water, sewer, garbage is about $55.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  4. #4
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    9,926
    -Property Taxes are about $3,500 / year for a 2,500 s.f. house and barn on roughly 2.5 acres.

    -$112 / mo. for electric which services heat and ac (we have no gas lines).

    -We have a well and septic, so no monthly cost there except electric.

    We don't have great schools, our libraries are okay, and our community colleges are great. Our largest chunk of taxes goes to Human Services (MRDD, Abused Children, Meals on Wheels, etc.).
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Where the Wild Things Are
    Posts
    2,264
    I pay a little over $3,000 in property taxes for a 110'x75' lot with a 1,300sf house and 600sf garage. A typical house assessed at $150,000 would pay about $3,600 with the home-owners exemption.

    I pay about $140 for gas/electric per month and $25 for water/sewer.

    Over half of the property taxes go to the schools here.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  6. #6
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,247
    The soon to be house will be about $2,050/yr on about 1/4 acres in an excellent school district and nice small town library. And the house is a 1,905 sqft 4 bd ranch with attached 2-car garage.

    I'm not sure about utilities because we haven't occupied it yet, but we have full city water/sewer and even the electric is owned by the city.

    The taxes are comparatively reasonable to me since this same house/lot in the last place I lived/worked would have been probably $9,000-$11,000/yr.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  7. #7
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Snarkville
    Posts
    6,591
    Just about 4k a year in property taxes for a 2500 sf home on 2/3 acre.

    Average electric = 50/month
    Average water = 15/month
    Average gas = 80 month

    I am on septic
    Children in the back seat can cause accidents - and vice versa.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    The Fox Valley
    Posts
    4,731
    Blog entries
    1
    Back in college, I lived in an apartment building that consisted of 8 units. The property (including the building) was 0.65 acres and the total taxable amount was at around $195,000. The tax rate was about 8.5% (5.3 for the school district, 0.9 for the county, 0.7 for the city, 0.5 for the community college, 0.5 for the park district, 0.3 for the library, 0.3 for the township).

    The total taxes for the property for one full year is around $16,700. Broken down, that's about $2,100 per unit. Broken down further, that's about $700 per roommate. So, basically the equivalent of two months worth of rent. Being renters, we didn't have to pay property taxes, but I always figured part of our rent went towards paying them though.

    Our utility bills were about $130 (on average) for electric, $40 for gas, $40 for cable/internet, and $100 for water. Water was quarterly. Electric and gas were monthly. So, on average, about $80 per roommate per month on utilities.

    Our rent was about $1060/month for 3 bed, 3 bath, and a basement. About $355 per roommate per month.

    ----

    At my parent's home in the suburbs, they pay about $5,400 in property taxes for a 3 bedroom, 2 car garage, split-level house on a 0.3 acre lot. The tax rate is about 7.4% (4.1 for the school district, 0.9 for the county, 0.9 for the village + SSA, 0.6 for the fire district, 0.3 for the park district, 0.3 for the community college, 0.2 for the library, and 0.1 for the township). I have no idea what their utilities are, but I think they are pretty similar to what we paid in college.

    ---

    Illinois' local governments rely predominantly on property taxes (and sales taxes), thus the higher rates.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  9. #9
    maudit anglais
    Registered
    May 1997
    Location
    Odd-a-wah
    Posts
    6,586
    In Ontario, property taxes are based on the value of your property or "Market Value Assessment". Which sucks as it those living in the outer suburbs pay less tax while costing more to service.

    I pay a little over $4k a year for a home valued at about $350,000, close to downtown.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Gig City
    Posts
    2,655
    In NJ for a $277,000 townhome $3,400 (no vehicle property taxes)
    In SC for a same priced 4 room detached home $1,025 (appx. $300 in vehicle property taxes/yr.)
    In NC what the rent would be paying for $1,400 (haven't received my vehicle property tax bill yet)

    Always amazes me how, especially in NJ, the school taxes don't cover squat and in the south with the much less property tax levy schools do fine, not great but fine, and these kids in NC still get into competitive colleges I'm sure.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,247
    I pay about $2,300 for both the home and the cabin.

    Electric and gas average about $165 a month for both homes. The cabin does not get used much.

    Detroit City water is about $25 a month, still a bargain but when I moved in it was only about $13.

    Don't ask me approximate worth of my homes. Both are in Michigan, therefore I will cry. Both homes together total about 1,600 square feet. Lot sizes are 35' by 100' in the City and about a half acre in cottage country.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  12. #12
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,173
    Yikes, I'm thinking I'm pretty fortunate!

    I live in an 1,100 s.f. house on 1/2 acre parcel - value of $125,000 in a rural township of about 1,200 people. I pay about $1,200 a year for property taxes.

    I have well/septic so no costs there.

    Gas for boiler is $70 a month (budget)

    Electric is $50 in winter, $100 in summer (a/c)

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Above urban19's plane field
    Posts
    2,370
    $2,080 for an 1,850 sf house on a little less than 2/3 of an acre. Last combined water/sewer/electric bill was $89, which will decline as we move into fall and winter (and that includes a $3.50/month fee for street lights). Last natural gas bill was $33, which will move into the $100+ range for winter (and of that $33, that's $3 for the actual usage, and $30 in the fricking fees that came out of deregulation).
    I found you a new motto from a sign hanging on their wall…"Drink coffee: do stupid things faster and with more energy"

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Upstate
    Posts
    4,854
    Total property taxes (town + school) = $4,200. And that's at a rate considered relatively low for this area. Our home sits on a little less than a 1/2 acre.

    We switched our heat source from oil to natural gas with a new furnace back in January, so it hasn't even been a full year... but so far, the bills have averaged $125-$150 per month.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2003
    Location
    "Somewhere in the middle"
    Posts
    3,160
    We have 2300 sq ft house on 1/3 acre. Value $165,000.
    We pay about $2000 in Taxes.

    Gas is an average of $120.00
    Electric is an average $150.00
    We pay right at $100 a month for water sewer trash. If we use more water in June than Jan or rate doubles.
    I can remember when my water bill used to be $12.00 per month. Those were the days.
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  16. #16
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Jukin' City
    Posts
    16,564
    My tax bill next year is about $2500; that represents a $500 drop from last year due to a lowering of the assessed value by about $40,000. Three bedroom, 2-1/2 baths on 1/3 acre.
    Water, sewer and garbage is roughly $100 a month.
    Electricity averages $300 a month during the summer heat; half that in the spring and fall; 2/3 that in the winter.

  17. #17
    1500 sq foot condo, 3 beds, 2 baths with a parking space.

    Taxes are about $3000/yr, electricity is about $50/month. Water is in condo fees. Highest monthly heating bill is about $150 (we keep our unit tropical warm), July a/c bill is about $175

  18. #18
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    202
    1800 sqft single family 4 bedroom, 3 bath on 2 acres I pay $1,100 in county tax and $2,800 in city tax. Gas, water and trash to city cost an average of $55/month from April to October and will increase to an average of $85/month during November to March, depending on how cold the winter is. Electric is much higher, in the dog days of summer (June through September) at an average of $150. The other months we pay an average electric bill of $55. We will keep our house around 77 degrees in winter and 73-69 in summer. Our electric provider will be increasing our bill by about 7% in 2011 due to a power cost adjustment. Looks like we'll be increasing our temp in the summer.

    Anyone want to buy a slightly used house? I'm ready to downsize.

  19. #19
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,572
    Blog entries
    3
    For the house I still own in suburban Cleveland: about $4,000 a year. 2,200'2/200m2, .5 acre/.2 ha lot.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  20. #20
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 1996
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    7,603
    Just an idea of what the property taxes are where I work (please remember NH has no broad based sales or income taxes, so property taxes are the #1 source of revenue for local government) for the just completed Fiscal Year:

    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  21. #21
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    5,738
    We pay about $6,000 a year in property taxes on a half acre lot for a house of just under 3,000 square feet (our tax bill has gone down by about $700 since we moved in in the spring of 2009). We wanted to buy a similar house about three blocks further east within the city limits but the taxes on the two houses that we looked at there were a bit more and with smaller lots.

    I know that our taxes are high but we live in a community with one of the best public school systems in the state and high schools that are always ranked in the top 1% of all public high schools across the country. Violent crime is virtually non-existent (property crime is lower than average for other similarly located suburban communities) and I imagine we have a pretty good response time from the fire department and EMS (luckily I've never needed them). We have all sorts of other services as well including quarterly hazardous waist disposal, an arts center, an awesome senior center (we have a lot of seniors in the area), an awesome newly renovated library with all sorts of free seminars and classes, a good public works department that is very responsive when contacted for road problems and the like, a couple nature centers (handled by the local schools) and even street sweepers that take care of the residential neighborhoods. The only drawback: we are a community of about 40,000 residents and we do not have a single public park. Luckily, there are enough nearby in the neighboring community that I can walk to and most of the churches and schools in the area have playgrounds if you are looking for that.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a 480 square foot ex baseball nacho stand
    Posts
    7,239
    Approx. $1500 for the 3bd/2b house on 1/3 acre
    Water/Sewer/Sanitation is around $35/month
    Power ranges from $50-$130 depending on air and/or heat use

    The other side of the coin should be what is your jurisdiction's tax rate. For me it's 42cents/$100 in the city and 68cents/$100 in the county (that's very close if not exact).
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  23. #23
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    5,738
    Quote Originally posted by Planit View post
    The other side of the coin should be what is your jurisdiction's tax rate. For me it's 42cents/$100 in the city and 68cents/$100 in the county (that's very close if not exact).
    Homestead total for me is $38.7861 per $1,000 of assessed value. The biggest chunk ($17.3754) of that goes to the local school district.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  24. #24
    Cyburbian TOFB's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loma Linda's
    Posts
    1,426
    I donno cuz I don't pay, and I don't pay them commie firefighters their fee neither. This is America, dadgummit.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian stroskey's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2008
    Location
    the delta
    Posts
    1,203
    Someone remind me why we pay based on value and not lot size? If you paid based on lot size only wouldn't it encourage more dense development and stop some sprawlish development? (You pay the same in the city or 25 miles out, so which will you choose?)
    I burned down the church to atone for my transgressions.

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Property taxes in incorporated vs unincorporated areas
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 09 Jun 2011, 8:59 PM
  2. Spin-off question about property taxes
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 13
    Last post: 15 Jul 2009, 1:37 PM
  3. Property Taxes
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 38
    Last post: 21 Aug 2006, 7:44 PM
  4. Municipal water and property taxes
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 22 Mar 2005, 4:57 PM
  5. Property Taxes!
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 46
    Last post: 14 Feb 2005, 4:50 PM