Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Transportation planning graduate schools

  1. #1

    Transportation planning graduate schools

    I am currently an undergrad student and will earn a Bachelors in Urban Planning and Development in 2012. I'm starting to look at graduate schools but am finding little information. I've looked at ACSP's Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Education and Planetizen's Top Schools For Urban Planners but wanted a little more information.

    I want to specialize in transportation planning and possibility with a combination of civil engineering or infrastructure. And preferably a school with more studio-based classes rather than lectures. My dream job would be working for the WMATA on their metro--I don't know if that would make much of a difference.

    So, after that long explanation, my question is, what are considered the 'good' transportation planning graduate schools?

    Any information would be helpful. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Arvada, CO
    Posts
    4
    I would also like to know about this, though specifically in the Denver Metro/Front Range area as I am already working in planning and have a family and home.

    Anyone?

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,817
    Look into ITE.org. I'm not sure if they list recommended schools. Keep in mind that a lot of tranportation planning is done by engineers, so you might want to go for a double masters.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  4. #4
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    10,910
    Quote Originally posted by Username View post
    I am currently an undergrad student and will earn a Bachelors in Urban Planning and Development in 2012. I'm starting to look at graduate schools but am finding little information. I've looked at ACSP's Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Education and Planetizen's Top Schools For Urban Planners but wanted a little more information.

    I want to specialize in transportation planning and possibility with a combination of civil engineering or infrastructure. And preferably a school with more studio-based classes rather than lectures. My dream job would be working for the WMATA on their metro--I don't know if that would make much of a difference.

    So, after that long explanation, my question is, what are considered the 'good' transportation planning graduate schools?

    Any information would be helpful. Thanks!
    If you are from Indiana and you are getting a Planning Degree that means you are at Ball State. Many of us on Cyburbia graduated from Ball State. If you are more focused on the civil engineering side then you should consider getting a masters in some engineering field. It hurts me to say it, but Purdue is just a short drive away and has an excellent engineering program. I would say that with an undergrad in Planning and a Masters in Engineering you would have a good skill set to be a successful transportation engineer. If you ever just wanted to do planning or engineering, that skill set would also allow you that flexibility. Good luck!
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally posted by nrschmid View post
    Look into ITE.org. I'm not sure if they list recommended schools. Keep in mind that a lot of tranportation planning is done by engineers, so you might want to go for a double masters.
    Is this usually the norm? I know a lot of aspiring transportation planners may have come from liberal arts backgrounds as opposed to math intensive engineering. Is there little hope for us in this career field?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,817
    Well, transportation planning is sometimes considered a wing of civil engineering (think of it as infrastructure planning/design). There is a certain amount of number crunching even for traffic counts, noise analysis, traffic flow, etc. Yes, there are more policy-oriented jobs, but I still think even those are often harder to come by coming right out the door.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Island-State Republic of Singapore
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally posted by mlee_07 View post
    Is this usually the norm? I know a lot of aspiring transportation planners may have come from liberal arts backgrounds as opposed to math intensive engineering. Is there little hope for us in this career field?
    I guess it also depends on what you really want to do at the end of the day.

    If you intend to do the hardcore transport modelling and planning, e.g. forecasting traffic projections, road network planning, public transport modelling and planning, traffic operations and systems, or transport infrastructure design (e.g. railway station construction), you will definitely need a modelling/calculations/engineering background to achieve this.

    Even for a policy type of job, I personally feel that it would be advantageous to have at least some working knowledge in traffic modelling, engineering and the like to appreciate (and understand) the transport system and how it all comes together.

    Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    25
    Thanks for the responses regarding the issue. I do feel I can obtain a pretty decent grasp of statistical analysis and modeling. I am also very interested in economic and community development so that is also another option I would love to explore. We'll see where it all leads.

  9. #9
    I'm a little late but wanted to share with you that Ohio State has a joint degree in transportation planning and civil engineering. The joint degree only requires one additional quarter/semester (OSU is in transition right now!). Check this link out: http://facweb.knowlton.ohio-state.ed...rans/joint.pdf

    The program advisor in the City and Regional Planning program suggests if you don't have the background in calculus/calculus-based statistics, to take Civil Engineering classes before you apply to the Civil program.

  10. #10
    The disciplines of Transportation Planning and Transportation Engineering overlap very little. That said, there are a lot more engineers that get into planning than vice versa. Do you want to be the one deciding where the road will go, or the one actually designing the road? You rarely get to do both, as they tend to happen years apart.

    Transportation Engineering gets broken into the CAD/microstation style design stuff and modeling. Modeling is broken into macro-scale regional models (Cube), and micro-scale traffic models (Synchro). Transportation Planning subfields include: Highway, Roadway, Transit, & Bike/Ped.

    Want to work for WMATA? Find a WMATA job application. What skills do they request?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    25
    I've done similar research, Regional Planning/Transportation Engineering dual-degrees, in the last few weeks. Among the top 10 Planetizen schools, Berkeley and MIT both offer institutionalized dual-degrees. Cornell offers Transportation Systems Engineering, but there is no mention of a dual-degree program with regional planning. Might be a matter of petitioning or an oversight on the website.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 1
    Last post: 29 Oct 2010, 11:41 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last post: 28 Jul 2009, 1:38 PM
  3. Planning graduate schools
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 07 Sep 2006, 2:24 PM
  4. graduate schools for urban planning
    APA Los Angeles Section (archive)
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 17 Oct 2005, 8:32 AM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last post: 08 May 1997, 8:41 AM