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Thread: Reducing the reliance of private motor vehicles through development assessment process

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    Reducing the reliance of private motor vehicles through development assessment process

    Hi all,

    I am working on an assignment for Uni which asks me to:

    evaluate a component of the development assessment process offering possible improvements and potential alternatives and/or outcomes
    .

    My chosen topic/component was reducing reliance of private motor vehicles (primarily cars). We have been asked to look at our local development assessment process and compare this to other systems in Australia and internationally, essentially benchmarking our system here in Perth, critiquing it and highlighting the weak points where changes could be made (and what changes they would be).

    I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of any relevant publications, case studies or examples that are relevant to this topic that I can further study and analyse. Any help appreciated.

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Keywords:

    Transit Orientated Development

    Buses

    Bikes

    Pedestrian networks
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Keywords:

    Transit Orientated Development

    Buses

    Bikes

    Pedestrian networks
    Hi,

    Thanks for the suggestions, however I am looking for working examples of how the development assessment process has been improved to provide those outcomes.

    E.g.

    A.) In one place the parking requirements may be a minimum of 1 parking bay per 100m2 of Gross Leasable Area (GLA) office space (fictional figure). This is the typical model style here in Perth.

    B.) Another place the parking may be instead allow reductions in parking bays if the development is within a TOD walkable catchment to a minimum of 0 per 100m2 GLA, have a minimum amount of 1 per 100m2 of cycle parking, requirements for end of trip facilities for any commercial office development over 500m2 GLA, and maybe even have a maximum number of parking bays such as 1 per 200m2.

    Obviously option B is going to be more effective at reducing and discouraging vehicle use than the typical, prescriptive first option. This is done by encouraging development to be located within TOD areas through incentives of not having to build as much parking, requiring more cycle facilities and capping car parking.

    Looking for examples like this.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Am I reading this right? One spot per 10,000 square meters? Or do you call 100 square meters 100 meters squared?
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

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    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Am I reading this right? One spot per 10,000 square meters? Or do you call 100 square meters 100 meters squared?
    100m2 = 100 square metres.

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    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner View post
    100m2 = 100 square metres.
    Yep that's correct- sorry about the confusion.

  7. #7
    What is a development assessment. Many of us may not be familiar with the term.

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    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    What is a development assessment. Many of us may not be familiar with the term.
    Assessing development.

    E.g. as a planning officer for a local government/authority we are often in charge for assessing a proposed development against a criteria to make sure that it is suitable for the area's context, land use zone and desired outcomes for the area/zone.

    A local authority might want to create more TOD development, so they might subsequently create a new planning policy that encourages public transport, walking and cycling (as exemplified previously) and also discourages car use.

    I don't know how the planning system works outside of Australia, but surely it isn't too different. How is development being controlled to meet desired outcomes in other countries, where are they doing well with it, are there any outstanding policies/documents that deal with vehicle use/reliance?

  9. #9
    There are others on this site that may know more but in general, land use regulation in the United States is much less free form. A city or county planning or building department would look at a proposed development and determine if it complies with the zoning code including any special district or overlays. If it does it can proceed pretty much as a right. If not, the developer would have to apply for a varience. Perhaps you are suggesting large-scale rezoning of cities?

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    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    There are others on this site that may know more but in general, land use regulation in the United States is much less free form. A city or county planning or building department would look at a proposed development and determine if it complies with the zoning code including any special district or overlays. If it does it can proceed pretty much as a right. If not, the developer would have to apply for a varience. Perhaps you are suggesting large-scale rezoning of cities?
    So through that process where are there opportunities to change the criteria and methods that planners use to promote a reduction in vehicle dependence?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner View post
    100m2 = 100 square metres.
    Thanks thats what I figured. Being from the States we talk in terms of sq ft. 10,000 meters of volume... one spot, I was thinking no way!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  12. #12
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by karl_stade View post
    So through that process where are there opportunities to change the criteria and methods that planners use to promote a reduction in vehicle dependence?
    Yes, when the master plan as adopted by the governing body has vehicle dependence reduction as an objective and the development regulations/design criteria as adopted by the governing body specify such actions. I am working on such now as are many others: it is in our master plan and I am drafting the regulatory codes to implement the plan.

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    maudit anglais
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    Off-topic:
    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Thanks thats what I figured. Being from the States we talk in terms of sq ft. 10,000 meters of volume... one spot, I was thinking no way!
    10,000 metres of volume would be 10,000 m3 no?

    It is common to express sq. ft as xxx ft2 here.

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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee View post
    Yes, when the master plan as adopted by the governing body has vehicle dependence reduction as an objective and the development regulations/design criteria as adopted by the governing body specify such actions. I am working on such now as are many others: it is in our master plan and I am drafting the regulatory codes to implement the plan.
    So what would the regulations/design criteria be?

    I am looking for 'nuts and bolts' effectively of how planning can reduce vehicle reliance through the development assessment process.

    How can you 'force' developers to build developments that are cycle, pedestrian and public transport friendly and complimentary, while discouraging private vehicle use?

  15. #15
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner View post
    Off-topic:


    10,000 metres of volume would be 10,000 m3 no?

    It is common to express sq. ft as xxx ft2 here.
    I learned area in architecture school, I'm an odd duck. What I find odd is that I use $1,000k as shorthand for a million, my sister who is a financial planner reads that as $1,000 trillion!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  16. #16
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by karl_stade View post
    So what would the regulations/design criteria be?
    I am looking for 'nuts and bolts' effectively of how planning can reduce vehicle reliance through the development assessment process.
    How can you 'force' developers to build developments that are cycle, pedestrian and public transport friendly and complimentary, while discouraging private vehicle use?
    Most of my work came from the "sustainable community development code and reform initiative" by the Rocky Mountain Land Institute. For some reason my link to their site is broken at the moment. I took all of their ideas, culled them down to what might work in my community. My list still runs to several pages and would not be that applicable to a place as large as Perth.

    How do you force developers? Never. Adopted regulations with significant community buy-in do.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by karl_stade View post
    So what would the regulations/design criteria be?

    I am looking for 'nuts and bolts' effectively of how planning can reduce vehicle reliance through the development assessment process.

    How can you 'force' developers to build developments that are cycle, pedestrian and public transport friendly and complimentary, while discouraging private vehicle use?
    You require road widths that allow bike lanes, reduce min parking standards, require space for bus stops, allow mixed-use (altho around here mixed-use office has very high vacancy rate so there needs to be incentives too), install sidewalks that support mid-block crossings. Here we like to incent things such as allowing an extra floor on height if they provide parking decks, that sort of thing.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee View post
    Most of my work came from the "sustainable community development code and reform initiative" by the Rocky Mountain Land Institute. For some reason my link to their site is broken at the moment.
    That's pretty good. I attended several of the presentations/workshops & I'd say that goes pretty far toward an actual reality that is sustainable. I'd say most of that content is for early adopters, though and can't see widespread adoption for quite a while. My 2

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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee View post
    Most of my work came from the "sustainable community development code and reform initiative" by the Rocky Mountain Land Institute. For some reason my link to their site is broken at the moment. I took all of their ideas, culled them down to what might work in my community. My list still runs to several pages and would not be that applicable to a place as large as Perth.

    How do you force developers? Never. Adopted regulations with significant community buy-in do.
    Thanks for the info. I'll try and find out more about the RMLA tomorrow.

    I am looking to do a couple of case studies of international examples of how development is being controlled by planners to attain reduce vehicle dependence, so an actual 'nuts and bolt' code and reform document will be needed to analyse and compare to our systems here in Perth.

    Btw- 'force' was only for lack of a better word.

    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    You require road widths that allow bike lanes, reduce min parking standards, require space for bus stops, allow mixed-use (altho around here mixed-use office has very high vacancy rate so there needs to be incentives too), install sidewalks that support mid-block crossings. Here we like to incent things such as allowing an extra floor on height if they provide parking decks, that sort of thing.
    Exactly, as well as other comments. Do you know of any successful planning policies/documents that deliver the outcomes and enforce these requirements for development?

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by karl_stade View post

    Exactly, as well as other comments. Do you know of any successful planning policies/documents that deliver the outcomes and enforce these requirements for development?
    First, it is RMLUI, all I find is linkrot at the moment.

    You may want to check out any of the "complete streets" work being done here. Plenty of cities trying to do something, you might start with Seattle, altho their drivers for change are sustainability and salmon. The ITE is doing quite a lot as well, and contribute case studies to help cities.

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    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    First, it is RMLUI, all I find is linkrot at the moment.

    You may want to check out any of the "complete streets" work being done here. Plenty of cities trying to do something, you might start with Seattle, altho their drivers for change are sustainability and salmon. The ITE is doing quite a lot as well, and contribute case studies to help cities.
    Michigan has just adopted a Statewide complete streets policy. Its going to be interesting to see how this will change things at not only the State level, but local as well.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Michigan has just adopted a Statewide complete streets policy. Its going to be interesting to see how this will change things at not only the State level, but local as well.
    How will people cruise the new Gratiot/Woodward with such policies? ;o)

    I see I forgot to include this link in my above reply.

  23. #23
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    How will people cruise the new Gratiot/Woodward with such policies? ;o)
    Out in the burbs? EZ, Gratiot and Woodward lots of capacity, medians, Michigan lefts. In the city, Gratiot now has a median and Michigan Ave (US-12) now has bike lanes as of a couple of weeks ago.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

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    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    I learned area in architecture school, I'm an odd duck. What I find odd is that I use $1,000k as shorthand for a million, my sister who is a financial planner reads that as $1,000 trillion!
    I often and normally use '1K' ('K' = 'Kilo-') to equal '1,000' (10^3), '1M' ('M' = 'Mega-') to equal 1,000,000 (10^6), '1G' ('G' = 'Giga-') to equal 1,000,000,000 (10^9), etc. Also, a square (something) is (xx)^2 and a cubic (something) is (xx)^3. For very large numbers, I'll use standard scientific notation '(x.xx)E(yy)' (ie, 4,560,000,000,000 = 4.56 x 10^12 = 4.56E12).

    (Yea, I know that this is bit of a tangent for this thread. )

    Mike

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    Quote Originally posted by mgk920 View post
    (Yea, I know that this is bit of a tangent for this thread. )

    Mike
    Feel free to create a separate thread for this discussion, thanks.

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